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8

Precisely what foods you need to focus on is going to depend entirely on your past diet, your current health situation, and your goals. There are, however, a few basics that anyone can implement for a better life pretty much right away. Rid yourself of artificial anythings: This includes artificial sweeteners, overprocessed TV dinners, chemicalized ...


7

Here are the nutrition facts of red and white quinoa from the same company. The main differences I can see are that red quinoa is slightly lower in total fat, marginally higher in sodium, fiber, sugar, and protein, vitamin E, riboflavin, and folate. Their amino acid profiles are pretty similar (they are both complete proteins). Just because red quinoa has ...


6

Wolfram|Alpha has nutritional information for a wide variety of foods. Just type in the food and the amount, and it will tell you the carbs, protein, fat, calories, etc. For example: 50 g apples: It even works for things like raw ingredients, so if you know how much flour, sugar, and butter you put in a recipe, you could tally up each of those ...


6

You can always go to glycemicindex.com. They have a database of foods available. NOTE: certain foods don't have any glycemic reaction like chicken, beef, etc. However if you marinade them, you'll have to check out what the GI is on the marinade. South Beach also has a GI food chart. A chart for glycemic index and load. And gilisting.com. Probably one ...


5

There can be no blanket answer to this question as there is quite a difference among available cheeses. Cheap American cheese (the processed kind) are not made with any kind of milk, and are a based instead on oil. When the cheese melts, it separates and becomes greasy. When it returns to a solid, the texture of the "cheese" is more like plastic than ...


4

I've personally never altered my diet for anything shorter than a marathon (my current half PR is 1:29). The purpose of increasing carbs for longer distances (runs longer than 2 hours) is to maximize glycogen stores. I would be skeptical that your body would actually need any extra stores for a run lasting less than 2 hours. A sensible diet of 60-70% carbs ...


3

There's a few things regarding supplement companies that you need to understand: They over promise and under deliver The majority of your results will be from a proper diet and exercise The less information you can get from the manufacturer's web site, the less you should trust them It appears that Musclecore X uses certain BCAAs, namely arganine to ...


3

Cooking (whether baking, frying, grilling, or using a microwave) has a nominal effect on the nutritional value of foods. Using the uncooked data for calculating the post frying impact is fine.


3

Your body needs certain nutrients, and any balanced diet will have those nutrients in the right proportions. However, within that general framework is a lot of latitude. Take for instance the "maintenance diet" that I was given when I finished my diet: Breakfast: 1 serving carb, 1 serving fat, 1 serving protein, 1 serving fruit Lunch: 1 serving protein, ...


2

I have used DailyBurn and MyFitnessPal. I currently use Myfitnesspal. Here are the features I recall. DailyBurn Create/find food Create your own recipe Get USDA information on raw foods Enter/track more vitamin and minerals on full web browser version MyFitnessPal Create/find food Create your own recipe Create your own meal Find raw foods searching ...


2

You have to keep in mind the following: 1 gram of fat yields 9 calories 1 gram of carbohydrate yields 4 calories 1 gram of protein yields 4 calories so for the food you are eating: Carbohydrates - 75g ==>75*4 = 300 cal Proteins - 6g ==>6*4 = 24 cal Fat - 15g ==>15*9 = 135 cal ==>Carb+protein+fat gives total calories = 300+24+135 = 459 cal ...


2

I'd say water and fiber. Look at a dried blueberry vs. a fresh one... there's practically nothing left after you dry it.


2

While I agree with Greg, I did some digging and came up with this information: An extra 400 milligrams of sodium in your body results in a 2-pound weight increase. Now, to me, this statistic is questionable, as the author does not site a source, and 2 pounds seems like a lot for that amount, but I cannot find any other discussion which offers a number, so ...


2

It's hard to find nutritional info on fruits and veg. because they are not written on the side of the packet in the supermarket so it's something you will need to research for yourself. About.com has the breakdown on many foods including fruit and veg. here are the links: Nutrition information for individual fruits Nutrition information for vegetables ...


1

Once again, people mistake correlation for causation. Your body is very capable of adjusting, and you won't "retain" water for any longer than it takes the body to process the extra sodium out of the body. It's a very transitory process. If you would like to read some literature, here are two studies, one on acute ingestion of sodium and phosphate, and one ...


1

There is no authoritative answer. Science and authority don't mix very well, but you can still have an authoritative answer to some question when the vast majority of scientists have come to the same conclusion. This happens when the known facts leave no room for other answers. In case of nutrition this is certainly not the case. Therefore the best you can ...


1

The idea that there is a certain amount of protein a person can absorb with in a set period of time is false according to this article. In short, the author points out that if it is true that we can only absorb 30g of protein in one sitting, as is widely accepted to be true by many, we would all be excreting the excess amount of food undigested. Since that ...


1

The scooped out bagel is the dumbest thing I've ever seen (Why not just cut it in half again instead of scooping out the middle? Are you stuffing it with something after scooping it out?). People are way too concerned with the amount of calories they are eating when they should be concerned about the type of calories they are eating. If you're concerned ...


1

http://www.livestrong.com is the best of the others I've tried. It allows user data and has a decent user interface unlike the competition. It'd be nice if they could all get together and offer a single database instead of the 5-6 bad ones you get now. Another place to try is mysupermarket, for example an Apple


1

I like the layout of http://nutritiondata.self.com/ quite well, but I agree that it's missing a lot of common ingredients to recipes. The most holistic list I've ever found is the one maintained by the FDA. It doesn't have as nice an interface, but I've found it to be incredibly comprehensive.



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