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24

You will find a lot of advice on the Internet about this one, most of it is not demonstrated. This is what the British Journal of Sports Medicine says about it: Recent research suggests that the timing of the intake of protein related to exercise may be more important than the total amount of protein consumed in a day. In the case of resistance ...


20

Articles Related to this exact question The mayo clinic has a great article answering your question: Is coffee good or bad for me? Also, there's this great article in slate published a few days ago answering this age old debate: Cafe or Nay USA Today (June 2010): coffee's endless health debate is grounded in fact Mayo Clinic Article Anyways here are ...


19

I'd say this depends on your fitness, the intensity of the workout and perhaps how much you've eaten the night before. Assuming jogging means a running speed of about ~10 km/h or ~6 mph, I expect you don't use that much energy that you can't cope with without jogging. More importantly, low intensity workouts mainly burn through fat and anything you would ...


16

The main difference is in the "purity", how much lactose and fat is left with the protein after filtering. Whey isolate usually contains around 90% protein and whey concentrate is more like 70-85%. If you have trouble digesting the lactose or are trying to minimize carbohydrate content, then whey isolate would be a good choice. Otherwise, it probably ...


16

I think some of the "addictiveness" is learned. I've found that when I've been eating healthy, faithfully, for a couple weeks, I start to crave healthier foods, and my desire for things like french fries and potato chips fades away. But if I eat the old junk foods again, the old cravings will come back again for days. Edit 2011-05-25: At the request of @Ivo ...


15

I suggest you read this article from the Australian Institute of Sports. About halfway down the page it has a section titled: Protein – are vegetarian diets adequate? There is too much info to quote there so I'll put it in point form, but I suggest you read the whole article: Although most vegetarian athletes meet or exceed recommendations for total ...


13

I don't see any reason to avoid the egg yolks; they have just as much protein as the whites (see nutrition facts in @Uw Concept's answer). The avoidance of egg yolks in almost every case stems back to the (false) theory that eating egg yolks damages one's blood cholesterol profile. In reality, egg yolks have a lot of nutrients and just as much protein as a ...


13

Right before your workout: Like you said, it's best not to exercise on a full stomach, so you should avoid large meals for about 1.5-2 hours beforehand. This will obviously vary depending on how long it takes you to digest. However, it's also really difficult to work out if you're hungry, so if you need a snack right before you exercise you should choose ...


13

There is a common saying that abs are made in the kitchen. Having a strong core and abdominal muscles is not enough to get "six-pack" or "washboard" abs, because there will likely be a large layer of fat over the abdominal region. In fact, you aren't able to really see six-pack abs until you are in the 8-15% range of Body Fat Percentage. Furthermore, the ...


13

Unless you're running in extreme heat conditions, for 30 minutes to an hour you really don't need any on course hydration. Drink some water beforehand, and afterwards to replenish sweat loss, and you should be fine. I've run up to 2 hours without on course hydration in moderate conditions. There is some evidence that even 2% dehydration can start to cause ...


12

There's some contradiction as to what's the most important part: timing, quantity etc. I have found pretty good studies that indicate that the post-workout shake doesn't really make a difference and then there are studies like the one Duopixel quotes that suggest the opposite. There are also many variables even regarding the post-workout shake: with/without ...


12

I don't have any source for this but my chiropractor and my experience, but I advise against working out in the morning on an empty stomach. My goal is to burn fat through 30-45 minutes of low intensity exercise 3-4 mornings a week, but trying to burn fat without any carbs doesn't work; your body ends up eating its own protein (read: muscle). From ...


12

Typically a "good carb" indicates that the food has nutrients and is absorbed into the bloodstream slowly. Whole: Fibers, husks, and other materials provide fiber (which limits an insulin spike) and vitamins. (e.g. Choose brown rice over white rice) Unrefined: Refining processes typically remove nutrients. In addition, they tend to render foods such that ...


12

The emphasis on grains comes from the fact that the food pyramid is produced by the USDA and grain is a major crop that the organization is behind. You'll also find the major U.S. subsidies (dairy, corn, soy) will play highly in the "recommendations" that come from the organization. You will not be missing out on major nutrients if you choose to take ...


12

You have already listed some good points. I don't believe eating spicy foods has any long term effect on metabolism. It's true that spicy foods increase the body temperature. Calories must be used to generate that extra heat. After a few minutes, the heat goes away, so what good does it do? Eating regularly makes your body believe that food is abundant and ...


11

Short answer It is NOT necessary to eat less carbs to lose weight. Scientific answer Weight loss occurs when you burn more calories than you take in. The body can take calories from the following food sources: Fat: 1 gram = 9 calories Protein: 1 gram = 4 calories Carbohydrates: 1 gram = 4 calories Alcohol: 1 gram = 7 calories It can also break down ...


10

the Egg whites are used for the muscle to recover, and grow. The amount of egg whites you "should" eat varies from person to person, and according to how intense you work out. The yolks, however, contain a lot of calories and cholesterol. And eating 8 yolks a day is just messing with your liver. A very good alternative is taking egg whites as a powder, or ...


10

Recent research has moved away from total cholesterol counts to pay attention to good HDL, neutral LDL, bad LDL and triglycerides. It has been found that some foods with high cholesterol raise the total cholesterol number, but they do it in ways that are not bad (raising large LDL and HDL). Other foods with low or no cholesterol (sugars), raise the bad LDL ...


10

There's nothing wrong with consuming protein before or during your workout. Some studies suggest that this may lead to enhanced results. Here's one example. Other studies, such as this one, claim that this is not the case, though, and that while your body responds differently to exercise when you load up on proteins before the workout, this difference does ...


9

If you are "actually" overweight, meaning that your body considers itself to have excess fat, then you can restrict calories significantly as long as you maintain a healthy lifestyle of exercise and can do so without becoming exhausted or excessively hungry. Some people can reduce intake into the low hundreds (300-500) or even stop eating completely for a ...


9

I've spoken to 2 sports nutritionists on this very subject over the past year, and both told me that protein is ineffective in post-recovery workouts, that the muscles can't absorb protein after working out. They said to eat a high-protein breakfast instead. They also said that carbs are all that count for recovery, and that you should eat carbs ...


9

I suggest you read the wiki article: In large amounts, and especially over extended periods of time, caffeine can lead to a condition known as caffeinism. Caffeinism usually combines caffeine dependency with a wide range of unpleasant physical and mental conditions including nervousness, irritability, anxiety, tremulousness, muscle ...


9

You don't want to overdo electrolytes, so if you're going to get them from fruits or vegetables, don't add much of anything. An avocado is a great example to get potassium. Also, bananas are great as well. Presumably unprocessed banana chips (dehydrated banana) would be a good start. Celery is also a good way to up your sodium levels. All of your ...


9

High heart rate workouts (running, swimming) You need to replenish carbs and electrolytes Sports drinks are probably preferred Fruits help replenish carbs, some better than others Low heart rate/high load workouts (strength training/body building) You need to replenish protein Best consumed within 1 hour post workout Special properties of Bananas ...


9

Most people on a Weight Watchers diet lose muscle, not fat. Their diets do not typically deliver a reasonable amount of protein and clean fat to maintain healthy organs and muscles. There are some exceptions, and while I'm not a nutrition professional I shadow a number of them in preparation for a career change in the next few years. In my experience, ...


9

The more processed and isolated the nutrient, the easier it is for your body to digest and make use of it. That's as true for protein as it is for carbs and fats. That said, you will never have 100% absorption rate of any nutrient. Some of it will be lost in the digestion process, and the protein powders from GNC (much less Starbucks) are not as ...


9

No, as far as science has been able to tell, this is not accurate. That is to say, eating at a certain time of day does not cause your body to somehow get more or less energy from the food you eat or store more or less of it as fat. Or if it does, the difference is not significant. From WebMD: According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Weight ...


9

Most people have misconceptions what 'tone', what it is, and how to achieve it. Being toned is a combination of two things - having muscle mass, and having a low enough amount of body fat to show the definition between the aforementioned muscles. A six pack is simply satisfying these conditions in a specific area - the stomach. Lifting If you're 6'1 152, ...


8

I think research is inconclusive on this matter, I don't believe there has been consistent scientific proof that HFCS is as bad as it was blamed to be recently. Aspartame is also similar. While generally seen as "bad", research seems to suggest otherwise. I personally avoid it, just to be safe. On a personal level, I think that as long as you have a ...



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