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10

Many people make the mistake in running that they think it's ok to just go out and run, without any base training. This misconception leads to a lot of injuries. My LONG run for the entire week is 10ish miles, and that's when I'm running between 30-40 miles/week. If you don't have a lot of base, then 10 miles twice a week is not what I would recommend. ...


9

No one can say how much you can train before you become overtrained. Firstly, there are too many factors involved, such as nutrition, weather conditions, your cardiovascular fitness, your fat percentage, your strength and explosiveness, the presence of any diseases (in particular autoimmune or inflammatory). Even if science knew how all those factors ...


9

Not sure why this is getting downvoted, but there is no surefire, fast, "urgent" way to get healthy. There are no shortcuts to becoming healthy or fit. Thinking otherwise is dangerous. This is also a very difficult question to answer, because it's vague. But the bottom line is, eat healthy, and become more active. Learn more about healthy nutrition from ...


9

How to know Well, since our friends looking at the problem in a very "sports science way" I will rephrase and add more details (which may not be as practical as you think. Please refer to an expirienced trainer to be the judge of the symptoms below (Self judgments can be too soft and over sensitive sometimes)) "Overtraining" might be to blame if your ...


6

There are two questions here: First, can you work out too long in one session? and Second, was I working out too long? The correct answer needs to frame the conclusion with the reasoning. Can you work out too long in one session? You will eventually reach a point where your body will be so fatigued and all your energy systems will be so depleted that ...


5

You may have stumbled with your sleep, eating, stress levels, amount of sunlight or socialization, or fallen into overtraining in a million other ways. Maybe your program simply has too much volume for you. Regardless, it sounds like you're overtrained. Take a day or a week off, and when you start up again, consider doing dramatically less. Five days a ...


4

I had this same same question and did tons of research for myself. Some quick notes of mine to take with grain of salt as I am trying to figure this all out too... Never stop learning. Treat your mind as a muscle and keep researching the subject. Overtraining could be defined as exceeding your bodies ability to supercompensate (recover stronger than ...


4

What you’ve described is not an average training routine in my opinion. You’ve got a pretty heavy workload if you consider holding a job as well. You make no mention of the amount of weight, sets, or reps that you perform, so, I’ll assume from your description of not trying to build muscle, that those numbers are sufficiently low. Effectively, you’re ...


3

Cycling is a good adjunct to running, but running and cycling activate the leg muscles in different ways, and also activate different supporting muscles. You also have the impact to to body that you don't get as much with cycling. As far as your 5k test, I think that you just started out too fast for your running fitness, which is common. One basic ...


2

Yes Sure, extra training can cause overtraining. But I don't think it'll be because you're overworking your legs. Squats are Not "Leg Exercises" Squats and deadlifts are only leg exercises if you're concerned with bodybuilding. They may be primarily leg-oriented, but they are full-body exercises. Your back and trunk, for instance, do a large amount of ...


2

You didn't get to where you are overnight. Why do you think that it is possible to reverse the damage quickly? One of the most dangerous things you can do to your health is to make sudden and drastic changes in your level of physical activity in an attempt to compensate for years of poor habits. Engaging in a strenuous exercise regimen without physician ...


2

I've had this before and although I'm a little cautious to throw the overtraining flag, research suggests there is correlation if not causation: These individuals became acutely overtrained as indicated by significant reductions in running performance from day 1 to day 11. The overtrained state was accompanied by severe fatigue, immune system ...


2

I can only speak from experience as someone else that usually works out a few hours before going to sleep. I often have the same problem, particularly after cardio due to the elevated heartrate, but sometimes after weightlifting too. The best thing you can do for yourself is to establish a night-routine that will help relax your body between a workout and ...


1

One. Overtraining is person-specific. Most given routines could overtrain one person while leaving another atrophying from insufficient effort. Two. In general, alternating muscle groups doesn't prevent overtraining. You can absolutely overtrain while using such a method.


1

Your program looks well designed and well followed, and none of what you've mentioned suggests overtraining in the normal sense. However, working out is literally a form of stress. It's supposed to be a manageable stress. If you're concerned about the physiological stress of working out affecting your condition, or if you're worried about overtraining, I'd ...


1

No. The volume of your workout is not enough for overtraining, and the fact that you took time off confirms your problems are not due to your lifting. See a doctor. Especially due to the fact that you have a preexisting hormonal disorder, your doctor will be the best source of information.


1

Why not juices and smoothies? Juices are probably what you're looking for since juicing will remove a lot of the fiber from a vegetable combo and allow you to get the concentrated nutrition as well as carbs without filling you up. For smoothies maybe use almond milk home made or store bought as your smoothie base. Then add fruit, like berries, apples, ...


1

If your performance is improving week-to-week and you're not suffering any health side-effects (compromised immune system, injuries, for example) you're not overtraining.


1

I have a theory... My theory is that you are exercising every day. If so, the problem that you are running into is that you are giving your body insufficient time to recover. This is sometimes expressed as: Training stress + recovery time = Improvement If you do not give your body time to recover, you will not improve; you will just continue to accumulate ...


1

The shin splints likely have to do with your shoes, not your routine. The best shoes just keep your feet warm (if it's cold) and protect them from scratches. They shouldn't be tight on your feet, they shouldn't slide around too much, and they shouldn't constrain how your feet can move. Nike Frees, Vibram FiveFingers, Vivo Barefoots, Innov8 BareX, Feiyues and ...


1

Any exercise can cause over training. There is no magic limit or number because everyone is different - you have different levels of stress, different sleeping habits, different nutrition habits, different intensity of exercise, etc. than anyone else so there is not cut and dry formula for what over training is. As a general rule of thumb, if you are ...



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