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4

I think most popular and effective training programs do not allow you to recover fully. Recovering fully, being at peak power and endurance, is usually achieved by tapering off your training. As such, simply by the fact that you'd taper off a training program (like 5/3/1, 5x5, etc) before a competition, it's a logical conclusion that not tapering off (ie: ...


4

What you’ve described is not an average training routine in my opinion. You’ve got a pretty heavy workload if you consider holding a job as well. You make no mention of the amount of weight, sets, or reps that you perform, so, I’ll assume from your description of not trying to build muscle, that those numbers are sufficiently low. Effectively, you’re ...


3

I've had this before and although I'm a little cautious to throw the overtraining flag, research suggests there is correlation if not causation: These individuals became acutely overtrained as indicated by significant reductions in running performance from day 1 to day 11. The overtrained state was accompanied by severe fatigue, immune system ...


3

I can only speak from experience as someone else that usually works out a few hours before going to sleep. I often have the same problem, particularly after cardio due to the elevated heartrate, but sometimes after weightlifting too. The best thing you can do for yourself is to establish a night-routine that will help relax your body between a workout and ...


2

I found out what is going on for me. In case others have questions similar to mine, this paper provides a pretty good background: Myalgic encephalomyelitis: International Consensus Criteria - Carruthers - 2011 - Journal of Internal Medicine - Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02428.x/pdf The specific issue ...


2

If you can't go into the gym and squat heavy twice a day, every day, you aren't overtrained, you're undertrained. (John Broz) And Why is it that those most inclined to worry and ask about “overtraining” are about as likely to set a new record in the Olympic Decathlon as they are to ever overtrain? (Greg Glassman) Your question is very subjective, ...


2

I'm not aware of any concrete studies on the matter, but basically CNS fatigue can be summed up like this: it's the overall degradation of hormones and neurotransmitters that are required for sustained physical output. I wrote an answer a while back that gets into the fairly low level chemical actions that limit strength output, it's worth reading if you ...


1

It really depends on your goals and programming. The answer could be yes or no. With my current routine, for example, I dead lift, front squat and bench press three times a week, however, I only complete 10 reps of each lift per session (broken up into 2-3 sets, rarely more than 85% 1 RM). Without getting into the fine details of my current program, I'm ...


1

It's sometimes said: Improvement = training stress + recovery Your training puts a stress on your system, and during recovery you get stronger. Most training programs are built around generating different kinds of training stress in efficient ways and providing appropriate time to recover. Both the amount of training to create stress and what is needed for ...


1

Your program looks well designed and well followed, and none of what you've mentioned suggests overtraining in the normal sense. However, working out is literally a form of stress. It's supposed to be a manageable stress. If you're concerned about the physiological stress of working out affecting your condition, or if you're worried about overtraining, I'd ...


1

No. The volume of your workout is not enough for overtraining, and the fact that you took time off confirms your problems are not due to your lifting. See a doctor. Especially due to the fact that you have a preexisting hormonal disorder, your doctor will be the best source of information.



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