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14

Make sure your forearm is not stacked on top of your humerus. It should be off to the side. You can do this stretch to help improve your flexibility for the catch position. What is most important is elbows up, not the finger position in the catch. If you lack flexibility, there are alternative catching grips you can use:


13

It depends. With ibuprofen in particular, the anti-inflammatory properties are beneficial. Initially inflammation is important for healing an injury, but too much inflammation is detrimental. Based on that I prefer to take ibuprofen if the inflammation persists, but not immediately after getting the injury. Pain killers can also indirectly contribute to ...


11

The short answer is yes continue your normally scheduled workout session. The soreness will be greatly lessened over time as you get used to using your muscles regularly. It is better to have a light day and keep exercising than it is to skip altogether. Now, severe DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness), as it sounds like you are experiencing, is a symptom ...


11

I would guess that by running exclusively on a tread mill you developed a stride that relied on the forgiving surface. I run exclusively in minimalist shoes (Vibram Fivefingers) on pavement with no complaints now but I ran in traditional running shoes for over a decade and had occasional knee or plantar fascia problems. I also spent about five years ...


10

It sounds like metatarsalgia to me. If you check out the symptoms section that article they match what you described. Running and jumping increase the risk of metatarsalgia, and anything that increases impact on your feet makes it worse. The article lists wearing shoes without appropriate padding as a risk factor, so your vibram's lack of padding may be ...


9

Muscle soreness is caused by damage to your muscles from your workout. This is a good thing, as it tells your muscles to adapt. As long as you are differentiating between soreness and injury, you can work out while sore. In fact, working out the same muscles will probably reduce the soreness you are feeling. Once you warm up, you might find the majority of ...


9

The first thing I would do is revisit proper form for your parkour workouts. You could be overusing your grip to compensate for weakness in your back or somewhere else. As for lifting, make sure you're split is such that you only lift each muscle group once a week. Before training you should stretch your forearms. There are 4 stretches. Extend one arm ...


9

The rotator cuff group is comprised of four muscles, commonly referred to as SITS. Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Minor and Subscapularis. Most of these serve to rotate the arm, although the Supraspinatus is responsible for abduction (movement away from the body) of the upper arm. Caveats - All of the exercises listed should be done with light weights ...


8

If you could go below all the fascia and muscle in that picture, you could see the ligaments that connect the bones: The anterior talofibular ligament lies in the area you point to in your image. According to Wikipedia this is "the most commonly sprained ligament," so there's a good chance that's your problem. This article can give you more info about the ...


7

It sounds like you either injured yourself or have exposed a "weak link" in your body, meaning your wrists/forearms are not strong enough to support your movements. I would suggest going into a rehab "mode" where you focus on strengthening the injured parts of your body, approx 4-6 weeks. Note I would recommend that during this period, you avoid any ...


7

Stop with the daily weight lifting? Try to give your body 48-72 hours of restitution between workouts.


7

Generally speaking, minor pulls and sprains tend to respond very well to RICE protocol Rest - Give the affected muscle time off to heal Ice - Reduces swelling and discomfort Compression - This may be difficult depending on exactly which muscle you pulled, but placing a constant pressure on it may also reduce swelling as well as providing much needed ...


7

I don't know the exact cause of cracking joints and as that page indicates professional opinion is also inconclusive, but I've always thought it was the cavitation of the synovial fluid which is again confirmed there. From Johns Hopkins' Orthopedic page: Cracking and popping of joints is usually normal and most of the time is nothing to be concerned ...


7

Forward head posture (called gravity induced kyphosis) is pretty common nowadays. The first thing you should do is begin stretching your neck with an exercise called neck retraction: You'll be amazed at how great this exercise feels. If you've been stuck in forward head posture for a long time, you'll feel as though your entire upper spine is waking up. ...


6

Rotate your exercises. Don't do the same muscle group two days in a row. Your muscles need 48 to 72 hours rest time. "Stop doing the daily lifting?" is exactly right.


6

Definitely could be shin splints. Here are 4 ways to alleviate shin splints. 1) Do the alphabet with your feet. Sit down and pretend your foot was a marker. Make a capital "A". Make a capital "B". etc. Do with right leg and then the left. 2) Take off your socks and stand over a bathroom towel. Use your toes to scrunch up the towel as though ...


6

Taking ibuprofen or other NSAIDs (anti-inflammatories that reduce pain and swelling) before for exercise can mask pain. Pain can be a warning sign to stop an exercise to prevent joint or soft tissue damage. Therefore, if you take it before exercise, you risk aggravating a problem.* However, if you have painful joints that prevent you from exercising, ...


6

Make sure you're getting enough potassium. Sodium and potassium are both critical to fuel your muscles. The typical diet is rarely deficient in sodium. But it is common to have low potassium levels. In fact, an increase in physical activity will increase your body's demand for potassium. That could explain the prolonged soreness you're experiencing.


6

This to me sounds like DOMS. Particulary if you haven't done this type of resistence training before and your form was good. Also the soreness caused by DOMS is a dull, aching pain in the affected muscle. As the article says: The pain is felt only when the muscle is stretched, contracted or put under pressure, not when it is at rest. I find that if ...


5

If you were already an avid runner before you started the barefoot thing, you have to remember that barefoot running is completely different. If you run 5 miles a day in tennis shoes, you will most likely get injured if you all of the sudden start running in vibrams. You have trained your feet to work with a standard support system your entire life, and ...


5

Here's a great article describing your symptoms, how to test and steps to take to correct: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/drryan26.htm I think the # 1 point is (from the article) Get the right diagnosis...without that, you don't really know what it is. I would have suggested against using any kind of wrist support, since long term it's not 'fixing' the ...


5

I've had a very similar pain after doing an intense dumbbell circuit that heavily taxed my forearms. Towards the end of the workout I got a sharp pain while doing barbell front raises -the stress is very similar on your grip/forearm as a kettlebell swing. So most likely this is an overuse injury which causes the tendon to get inflamed. From personal ...


5

Are you forefoot striking? Forefoot striking places more load on your calves than a heel strike would, and could explain the soreness in your calves. And forefoot striking is a good thing as it tends to prevent more serious injuries. In addition to this, one might think that eventually your calf muscles would catch up. But this depends on the distance ...


5

Maybe your monitor is too high or not at the right angle. It should conform to these standards: (From this question about standing desk ergonomics.)


4

Seriously, I had this issue when I used to work as a stock boy at KMart a long time ago. The doctor called it tennis elbow. This had occurred one summer when we had been receiving tons of bikes in boxes. All the boxes were the same size, shape and weight. And I picked them all up and carried them the same way from the truck to the conveyor belt going into ...


4

If slowing down instead of stopping seems to help then why not just go that route. When I was in the Army, we didn't stop running. We slowed down, but we didn't stop. Part of it is keeping a rhythm and is mental, the other part is adrenalin. Keep in mind that in order to increase your aerobic fitness, you must keep your heart rate up above a certain ...


4

It sounds like it could be shin splints. Usually you'll experience the pain right in the front of the leg or sometimes on the sides of the shinbone. It's also usually a dull pain. Technically, shin splints can be caused by several different factors. I've experienced them as a result of over training. In that case, stretching and physical therapy worked ...


4

Since you work so much longer and harder than usual at tournaments, it's not surprising that you're feeling some soreness (see this Wikipedia article on delayed onset muscle soreness for more info), but I can think of a couple things that might help your calves and knees hold out a little better: Warm up properly. Warming up increases blood flow to the ...



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