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7

The surface you are running on may play a role in how your body reacts. There’s an often quoted study co-authored by Southern California podiatrist John Pagliano that states… "… one of the five leading causes of injury is "improper" running surfaces........concrete is approximately 10 times harder than asphalt, so all your bones, muscles and ...


6

There may be hope for recovery. Here are the hard truths. Some injuries are permanent. Some injuries are temporary. Some injuries would be temporary, but are not taken care of properly, so they become ongoing problems. There is no way people on the internet, who have never seen your knee or your wrist, can tell you if your injuries are permanent or ...


6

What you are feeling is normal. Any time you do a new exercise, or even an old exercise in a new way, you will be pushing your muscles past the point where they are comfortable and making them sore. For the most part, this is lumped into the term Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). For some people, the presence of DOMS becomes a goal or a indication of a ...


5

Most of the migranes are hereditary. Biological states may cause increases in free fatty acids and blood lipids, increased platelet aggregation, decreased serotonin levels and increased prostaglandin levels, which can cause the vasodilatation that precedes migraine headache. One possible reason for this is that a part of the physical reaction may be the ...


5

While concrete may be a harder surface than asphalt, other than preconceived perceptions, there is not an appreciable difference in deflection (Force returned from a surface) between concrete and asphalt. There is a difference between grass, dirt, rubberized track surfaces, etc., but between asphalt and concrete any difference that you perceive is ...


4

I primarily agree with Sparafusile. DOMS is pretty normal, especially for those impulse exercise sessions where you haven't warmed up, or haven't done the exercise before. Over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatories such as aspirin or ibuprofen combined with heating pads or hot baths will give you enough relief to be able to sleep. For steps, as ...


4

Your problem might not be with the hardness of the ground you're running on. If you run on a sidewalk that is on the same level on the road you shouldn't see much difference. I think the issue here is the fact that sidewalks are not as straight as paved road. Most sidewalks have bigger slopes going down, up, then back down again. And the sidewalks stop when ...


3

Years ago, I had a similar experience that actually led to trigger finger. I have only anecdotal evidence, but, I am convinced that doing chin ups was, in some way, related to the cause of my problem. Once my problem was resolved, I still wanted to perform chin ups, so, I invested in a good pair of padded weight lifting gloves, and, more importantly, a set ...


3

It could be something more complicated, but generally I'll just say that running hurts, especially when you're just starting or increasing your mileage. I would recommend following a training program like couch-to-5k. With something like that, the distance increase and schedule will be regulated. If you have excessive problems with pain or handling the ...


2

As Alec said above, delayed onset muscle soreness is not something you should use to gauge the effectiveness of your workouts. Increased ability to lift more weight using proper form is the real test. If you are worried about proper form one of the best resources I've found is the Strong Lifts guide. A key way to continue to perform squats well is to ...


2

Ref foam rollers.They don't work for me! Here is my story. I am 74 in a very good shape, I exercise regularly and I practice moderately a number of sports, including bicycling, kayaking and windsurfing in summer. Last winter, one year ago, I had sprained a back muscle while unsuccessfully resisting falling on the ice on my way home. A week after,the ...


2

It may sound unnatural, but squeeze your glutes (butt cheeks) as hard as you can during the lift. It will prevent your back from bending. Stronglifts explains it very well. The section "Common Pains" explains how to avoid injury.


2

Depending on how comfortable you are with not putting weight on your toe, pretty much anything is valid. Properly done third-world squats should not be putting any real weight on your toe (less than walking, certainly). Hindu Squats, of course, are out. Pistol squats on the one leg probably ought to be fine. In terms of machines, most of them should not be ...


2

"...it feels like they get stuck/stay flexed at the beginning and only when my whole hand is almost opened they get unstuck/unflexed very sudden and harshly." What you described sounds like a case of trigger finger. It’s a pretty common overuse syndrome and may have some wrist involvement. From the Mayo Clinic... “People whose work or hobbies ...


2

It's generally referred to as "runner's itch". It's caused by capillaries in your skin being flushed with blood that they're not used to. Generally, it occurs in people who go for strenuous runs, hikes, or walks, when they're not conditioned to that type of workout. I don't know what kind of national athlete you are, but I'm guessing that distance running ...


2

This happened to me once. I was staying at a hotel, and decided to go to the gym to work out. I had never had anything like a post-workout headache before. I had never had anything like a migraine before. About 15 minutes into the workout (once I started to really warm up and sweat), a headache started, and within minutes it became debilitating -- I spent ...


1

It sounds like the pain in your hip is coming from your hip-flexors. This group is comprised of the: Illiopsoas; Sartorius; and Rectus Femorus. Their purpose is to: Flex your hip joint; Flex your trunk forward; Pull your thigh upward; and to help stabilize your lower body (at the pelvis). This picture doesn't do a great job of showing the weight ...


1

Where are you located? I work with people who are in pain with posture based corrective exercises, and can help you move back into using weights. If you're not in my area, I can still lead you in the right direction. The other aspect of joint inflammation is your nutrition, as this plays a big role in ridding your body of such issues, especially if you have ...


1

Calm down......there is no cause for anxiety. REALLY! In addition to the splendid answer provided above, I'd chime in and remind you that Weightlifting (and exercises in general) is a long-term program. Even if you take a year off to heal properly, you'll easy bounce back when you decide to continue lifting. What you don't want is to turn a ...


1

Yes, there are plenty of upper body workouts you can do with an injured toe(bench press, bicep curls, seated shoulder press, seated row, etc.) As for lower body, you're kind of stuck a little bit for barbell exercises, but you could certainly continue to do leg curls and leg extensions on the machines!:)


1

Several years ago I began feeling a sharp pain in my left shoulder (behind my deltoid muscle, near the joint) during chest exercises. At first the pain was minor so I kept with my normal weightlifting routine. Over the next few weeks, however, the pain became progressively worse. It finally reached a point where I could no longer do any chest exercises (or ...


1

If you take a look at some basic anatomy charts, you'll see that's right where the rectus femoris muscle and tendon attach. If the pain is mild, you're probably just a bit strained. Pull back a bit, do exercises that don't cause that area to hurt for a week or two, and see if it feels better. If the pain is sharp, or it's not getting better, see a doctor. ...


1

I too recently noticed this pain after doing pushups daily for about 3 weeks. It was my right palm. I am right hand dominant. I will assume you are left hand dominant. I decided to rest and took 4 days off. Did my pushup routine last night and didn't experience the pain. Now I'm trying to decide if I want to continue with my daily pushup routine or try the ...


1

This is likely a reaction from lack of oxygen due to shortage of breath. Your cells need oxygen and when they are starved, there is a build up of adenosine triphosphate that can cause a burning sensation. It's not a bad thing. It essentially means your muscles want more energy and oxygen than you can produce at that time. No damage is done and you recover ...



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