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7

Forward head posture (called gravity induced kyphosis) is pretty common nowadays. The first thing you should do is begin stretching your neck with an exercise called neck retraction: You'll be amazed at how great this exercise feels. If you've been stuck in forward head posture for a long time, you'll feel as though your entire upper spine is waking up. ...


4

Pain during a lift is indication of injury. We can't diagnose what that injury is, but you need at minimum a rest week, a 20% deload, and mandatory form checks before allowing yourself to progress to heavier weights.


3

No, I don't think it's ok to continue running barefoot or minimalistic. The ankle pains are a clear indication you still need better footwear at this point. It could be that your calf muscles aren't strong enough, or even that you don't have the build to run without proper protection of conventional running shoes. My advice is to temporarily stop all ...


3

Sounds possible that you have shin splits http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin_splints They will go away with some time off. This is common with individuals who are new to the level of training that are taking on. My recommendation is to rest for 3 days and start again (rest means you don't have to stop training, just don't do what you have been) As ...


3

Based on your description this sounds like a very common side stitch (see the wiki entry here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Side_stitch). As explained in the article (which was informative for me even though I have experienced these off and on when exercising for as long as I can remember) there can be a few factors causing this. For me, it generally ...


3

The thing that concerns me is this: Here is my problem. 2 weeks ago I got squeezed by the 142.5kg (314lbs) barbell while doing squats. Nothing really bad happened because I have squat rack, but I felt a little needle pinch in my left upper belly (just under my ribs). I have a mental picture of your upper body folding forward creating an impingement. ...


3

You're probably not maintaining a neutral spine as you attempt to perform your crunches. Be mindful of what you're doing with your head and upper back/cervical spine as you execute the movement. Filming yourself while you perform this exercise (from the side would probably be most beneficial) and looking at your spinal flexion will help you determine whether ...


3

I'm going to caveat this answer by informing you I am not a physical therapist. The routine I'm linking to is from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: Rotator Cuff Shoulder Conditioning Program. Some high points are: The rotator cuff needs to heal. If your client has pain dealing with any of the exercises outlined, don't do them. Strengthening ...


3

To answer your question best, you need to understand why you are doing overhead press. If you are doing Starting Strength or Strong Lifts, it's best to leave it in there and keep working on it--in those programs it's used for both core work and shoulder work. If your goal is simply to have stronger shoulders, then there's no reason to remain standing. If ...


3

It sounds like the problem with your (standing) overhead press is either form or maximal isometric strength in the core. Changing to an exercise that removes both of these factors and doesn't improve them does not seem like a productive way to increase your overhead press. Without a lot more details on your training history (sets, reps, loads, frequency), ...


2

I'll address this in two ways, as the final answer really does depend on your goals. Unless otherwise stated, when we are talking about squats, I'm assuming back squats. Health Reasons for Full Squats Specifically, one of the main reasons to squat to depth (defined as the crease of the hip parallel or lower than the top of the knee) has to do with joint ...


2

Part of the reason for squatting deep is to avoid muscle imbalance, but that's not my primary reason. Squatting to parallel or beyond uses the knee and hip joint through a fuller range of motion than half-squats or other partial movements. This is good for mobility and strength for a variety of tasks. Squatting deep also protects the knee joint by ...


2

No. What's preventing you from doing the standing form correctly is not your shoulder strength. Increasing your shoulder strength in the seated version will actually make it more difficult to do the standing version properly, because your shoulders will be able to support even more than your core is able to brace. (Edit: I'm removing my advice to simply ...


2

These two points might seem pretty simple however extremely important and good to know. First rule, STOP your workout exactly when injury happened and DO NOT continue the session. In the coming weeks, don't leave the injured muscle/joint isolated due to the injury. The trick is not to directly work it directly, but to work around it. In more details: As ...


2

You most likely have developed tendonitis. Several causes for this problem: Bad form. You should either ask someone experienced to take a look at your form or record yourself so that you can watch for any mistakes. Too heavy too often. You're using too heavy weight and too often (85%+ 1RM sets 2+ days a week). While your muscles may be ready to take on the ...


2

First things first is to take an assessment of your father. Typical problems of inactive people who spend a long time sitting include: Weak upper back (rear delts, traps, rhomboids) Tight chest muscles Slumped forward shoulders Tight hip flexers Stretched glutes Weak lower back Mobility focused work such as strengthening weak muscles and stretching the ...


2

Unfortunately, you really can't do much with the pecs without involving the anterior deltoid. The anterior delt works with transverse flexion (Any kind of movement bringing the upper arm from the side towards the center) and as a stabilizer of the shoulder girdle. Any kind of pressing motion will aggravate this. As you've noticed, the more emphasis towards ...


1

Walking is not leg work (unless you are morbidly obese) and getting sore after squatting a 50lb barbell would imply you need to develop more strength in your legs. If this is all you can squat - which would be weird considering you said "I only care for strength and nothing else as part of my workout" - I have to disagree with Macedon93. You should be ...


1

Hey Peter, First, check your form and ensure it's good. If your form is bad, that isn't good. Second, Yes, the undeveloped strength in your arms could also be a factor. Your whole body is being supported by your arms; if they don't have enough strength, you should feel the soreness in your shoulders, lats, and arms. Solutions Keep working on it; the ...


1

I actually hate the idea of answering questions with comments as well as questions not having a real answer, so this might be a bit OCD, but here we go: As I pointed out in the comments, you probably did raise your working weight too fast. While different programs use a wide range of progressions, most agree on raising the working weight by a maximum of 10% ...


1

LarissaGorilla, Reading and anecdotal experiences have shown that weight squatting helps with knee pains. While i can't give a resource-backed answer at the moment, my theory is that: Squatting improves the strength of your body, including your thighs, overall legs, and body. Because the legs are now stronger, the muscles are more able to sustain the ...


1

I have dealt with this exact same injury (on the left side). I stopped doing all squats and dead-lifts for 2 month and waited for it to be back to 100%. Berin answer is spot on from my experience. During the 2 month hiatuses I focused on chest supported rowing, (non-chest supported rowing like bent rows caused a similar pain to squatting) LAT pulls, chin ...


1

The first thing you should do to get him started is to get him on a good stretch routine every day to combat the inactivity, and get the muscles being used to being stretched before adding weights. After I would say a week or two of just this stretch routine I would go on and but 10-35 lb weights depending on the physical level of your dad. If the only issue ...


1

Pain can be an indication that something is wrong. It is not normal to have pain in your spine during or after crunches. Abdominal muscle soreness could be normal, but not back pain. Upper back pain from doing crunches may be caused by jerking or pulling on the head and neck with your hands to lift the head. If you tend to pull on the head, try changing ...


1

We can't diagnose your pain, but you should rule out runner's stitch. http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/ask-doctor-why-sudden-pain-my-chest http://www.runnersworld.com/beginners/how-do-i-get-rid-of-side-stitches


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It could be a number of things but I would ask myself: If I lower the weight does the pain subside? Pain is usually an indication of an injury, have I injured myself? If you perform a front squat, does the pain still occur? How about during any other exercises? I found that this happened to me during military presses. I would be able to press the weight, ...


1

This is the result of simple oxygen deprivation and a little bit to do with posture. Try leaning forward a bit when running. To help with the oxygen problem, breathe in deeply once in a while when you're on your run. This will stretch out your diaphragm, your lungs, and your muscles along your pecs and collarbone. Also, it helps to keep your breathing ...



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