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7

Forward head posture (called gravity induced kyphosis) is pretty common nowadays. The first thing you should do is begin stretching your neck with an exercise called neck retraction: You'll be amazed at how great this exercise feels. If you've been stuck in forward head posture for a long time, you'll feel as though your entire upper spine is waking up. ...


3

No, I don't think it's ok to continue running barefoot or minimalistic. The ankle pains are a clear indication you still need better footwear at this point. It could be that your calf muscles aren't strong enough, or even that you don't have the build to run without proper protection of conventional running shoes. My advice is to temporarily stop all ...


3

Sounds possible that you have shin splits http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin_splints They will go away with some time off. This is common with individuals who are new to the level of training that are taking on. My recommendation is to rest for 3 days and start again (rest means you don't have to stop training, just don't do what you have been) As ...


3

Based on your description this sounds like a very common side stitch (see the wiki entry here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Side_stitch). As explained in the article (which was informative for me even though I have experienced these off and on when exercising for as long as I can remember) there can be a few factors causing this. For me, it generally ...


2

Unfortunately, you really can't do much with the pecs without involving the anterior deltoid. The anterior delt works with transverse flexion (Any kind of movement bringing the upper arm from the side towards the center) and as a stabilizer of the shoulder girdle. Any kind of pressing motion will aggravate this. As you've noticed, the more emphasis towards ...


2

Nothing concrete for you here but I have found that having a packed neck when doing overheads helps reduce any shoulder pain ( I subluxated my shoulder years ago ). Packing seems to open my shoulders range of motion up for some reason.


2

I have exactly the same problem. This was in both shoulders but the left eased off but the right was really stiff. The physio diagnosed the problem which was a 'frozen shoulder'. Stretching exercises 6 times a day to get the ball joint free and start being more flexible. This will work but need to keep up with exercises and always keep active which will ...


2

This happened to me when I started doing vigorous yoga again after an extended period of absence. My flexor muscles would cramp in simple things like child pose, but my base foot would always cramp during balance postures. It went away after a few weeks, in combination with the exercise and corrective measures. My primary training is as a massage therapist ...


2

The medical term is (BFS) benign fasciculation syndrome. Loosely translated, that means "probably not serious muscle tremor". Here's a video of a man's calf muscle with BFS. Like most benign conditions, it's not extensively studied. Research (fortunately) tends to go where's the greatest need and unraveling the mysteries of a harmless eye twitch doesn't get ...


2

If you're squatting full depth 260lbs, I doubt it's a strength issue. I used to race competitively (road and mountain), and I can offer up a few places to get started. 5MPH is extremely slow. Like so slow that you can almost tip over because you're not carrying enough velocity to track in a straight line. At a good clip a hiker with a full pack can move at ...


2

With the amount you're running (daily, 1-1.5 hours) it is most likely that you have developed IT band syndrome. It is an inflammation of the ilio-tibial band as it passes over the lateral epicondyle. In other words a ligament is sore on the side of your leg just above the knee joint. The pain is in non weight bearing so as you straighten your knee rather ...


1

The only way you can figure out if it is serious is to go to a doctor or a PT. If you don't want to do that, you could try foam rolling the area. If it is related to muscles or tendons that can help.


1

I recommend rolling the bottoms of your feet with a tennis ball; that should help loosen things up nicely.


1

How you should react totally depends on what your specific medical diagnosis is, which we can't speak to. However in a (perhaps?) similar situation, what worked was a drastic temporary reduction in shoulder lifting volume and a less-drastic reduction in overall training volume. This gave my shoulder time to de-inflame so I could gradually work back up. ...


1

I had exactly this pain, unfortunately I can't recap the explaination I got from my physical therapist, but essentially it was an inbalance issue. Try this, keep your arms straight, hands facing eachother, about 20 cm appart, as low as possible, i.e. below your waist, then raise them slowly in front of you, arms straight, until hey are directly above your ...


1

Shoulders shoulders shoulders. Shoulder problems more often than not are caused by an over-developed chest in relation to back. This leads to posture problems. Think of it when you're sitting at the PC your arms are facing forward, when you're driving, cooking, reading, etc all the same stance stretching out the already weak back and rear delt. I think ...


1

Before you do anything, you should ask your doctor if there's anything you should avoid doing or anything you should specifically do. I'm not sure if there's anyone here with the training to speak to this specific circumstance. As a general rule, it's usually not a bad idea to start with walking, stretching, and manipulating extremely light weights. The ...


1

Walking is not leg work (unless you are morbidly obese) and getting sore after squatting a 50lb barbell would imply you need to develop more strength in your legs. If this is all you can squat - which would be weird considering you said "I only care for strength and nothing else as part of my workout" - I have to disagree with Macedon93. You should be ...


1

Hey Peter, First, check your form and ensure it's good. If your form is bad, that isn't good. Second, Yes, the undeveloped strength in your arms could also be a factor. Your whole body is being supported by your arms; if they don't have enough strength, you should feel the soreness in your shoulders, lats, and arms. Solutions Keep working on it; the ...


1

I actually hate the idea of answering questions with comments as well as questions not having a real answer, so this might be a bit OCD, but here we go: As I pointed out in the comments, you probably did raise your working weight too fast. While different programs use a wide range of progressions, most agree on raising the working weight by a maximum of 10% ...


1

LarissaGorilla, Reading and anecdotal experiences have shown that weight squatting helps with knee pains. While i can't give a resource-backed answer at the moment, my theory is that: Squatting improves the strength of your body, including your thighs, overall legs, and body. Because the legs are now stronger, the muscles are more able to sustain the ...


1

Late response I know but in case you are still experiencing issues with this my experiences with the 5x5 programs may be of help. I've found that the 5x5 strength training programs are great for someone that is new to weight training or someone that is trying to get back in shape. But as you progress through the program and your fitness level improves to ...



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