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Definitely sounds like trigger finger to me. I have experienced the same in my left hand little finger. You should see a hand specialist, and they can verify. I received a shot of cortisone to the inflamed area and it has been great since. There is also a minor operation you can have where they cut the sheath so it heals slightly larger and doesn't catch ...


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"...it feels like they get stuck/stay flexed at the beginning and only when my whole hand is almost opened they get unstuck/unflexed very sudden and harshly." What you described sounds like a case of trigger finger. It’s a pretty common overuse syndrome and may have some wrist involvement. From the Mayo Clinic... “People whose work or hobbies ...


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While concrete may be a harder surface than asphalt, other than preconceived perceptions, there is not an appreciable difference in deflection (Force returned from a surface) between concrete and asphalt. There is a difference between grass, dirt, rubberized track surfaces, etc., but between asphalt and concrete any difference that you perceive is ...


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The surface you are running on may play a role in how your body reacts. There’s an often quoted study co-authored by Southern California podiatrist John Pagliano that states… "… one of the five leading causes of injury is "improper" running surfaces........concrete is approximately 10 times harder than asphalt, so all your bones, muscles and ...


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Your problem might not be with the hardness of the ground you're running on. If you run on a sidewalk that is on the same level on the road you shouldn't see much difference. I think the issue here is the fact that sidewalks are not as straight as paved road. Most sidewalks have bigger slopes going down, up, then back down again. And the sidewalks stop when ...


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Your primary concern here is obviously to identify the cause of your pain. To investigate this, you will need to use exercises which are broadly similar to the military press, compare which of them cause pain, and use these as a basis from which to locate the issue. For instance, in this video by Jeff Cavaliere, he uses barbells, dumbbells, and cables to ...


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Hard to say anything definite without seeing a video or pictures but I'm thinking it could be a combination of a weak core and faulty technique. Try doing the plank and back raises, without and with added weight, and see how it feels. Does it hurt similarly? As for diagnosing your form: look in a mirror to see the curvature of your back, as you're ...


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I have a torn medial meniscus in my left knee so was always terrified by squats. However after 2 years of doing squats now below parallel and working on form, I can say that not only have I not had knee pain after squats, but my legs actually feel alot stronger. I have a fast synopsis of how to avoid knee pain after squats here.


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I like standing diagonally, because you have balance in all directions, you won't have to compensate with the curvature of your back as much to avoid falling over. Also, keep your core tight while pressing.



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