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8

The main differences between the two is the philosophies behind it, and how they are designed to work. First and foremost, it is important to realize that Paleo does allow carbs, just not grains and legumes (or anything that grows underground). Atkins Is a ketogenic diet. It puts your body in a safe version of a fasting state so that your body turns fat ...


8

The simple answer to gluten is that gluten comes from wheat. It's one source of carbs out of many. It's in important part of baking, but a significant number of people have celiac disease or some other form of gluten sensitivity. As a result they need a gluten free diet. The paleo diet and diets similar to that avoid all grains. They associate a number ...


4

You'll need to pay attention to the amount of carbs you're eating; while the basic paleo prescription tends to run lower carb, you'll want to eat things like yams and sweet potatoes pretty frequently. I would recommend Loren Cordain's The Paleo Diet for Athletes as a good resource for more specifics.


4

Berin Loritsch is mistaken in that Atkins would be meant only for weight loss. It is meant for prolonged use as well as any reasonable diet. In Atkins you drop the carbohydrate intake to max of 20 grams per day for two weeks. After that you start gradually adding carbohydrates to your diet until you reach the point where you stop losing weight. Then you ...


3

Yes, no and maybe. Unfortunately, that's going to be about the best answer you will get. Exercise has proven to be a heart disease limiter, and certainly reduces the risk factor of obesity (Assuming you don't eat massive amounts and stay fat), so in that sense, yes, it can reduce heart disease. But, if you still smoke and/or eat a bad diet, it's not going ...


3

After a quick readup of what the paleo plan is, the biggest thing I can see is that it is not plan compliant. There's a couple things to remember about "sugar free" gum and similar products: Sugar free gum simply doesn't contain cane sugar. However, it still contains sugar alcohols which still have both calories and a glycemic impact. Some sugar free gum ...


3

One of the more accessible (and less dogmatic) approaches can be read here: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ There are many varieties of the Evolutionary Eating idea, so a strict definition of "this is PALEO" will be hard to come by. http://www.paleonu.com/panu-weblog/2011/3/30/paleo-20-a-diet-manifesto.html is a good view as to what ...


2

Paleo is a poor term choice, because the point is to eat healthy, not to replicate a lifestyle. The goal is to eat what we have evolved to eat during millions of years. Grains were only widely available in our diet when we started agriculture, a few thousand years ago. Before that, they couldn't be a material part of the diet. In fact, many modern grains ...


2

Finally I found one study about the effects of cyclic eating: Stote et al. (2007) : A controlled trial of reduced meal frequency without caloric restriction in healthy, normal-weight, middle-aged adults Quotations from the paper: Design:The study was a randomized crossover design with two 8-wk treatment periods. During the treatment periods, subjects ...


2

There are a lot of resources that I use for it, but it's very hard to find a concise source, as a lot of people have varying degrees of what they'll allow that range from no concessions (strict paleo) to including dairy and peanut butter and the like (usually when it's paleo with dairy, the word primal is thrown around. Some resources: ...


2

It could be the specific choice that didn't agree with your wife. Essentially, there are a couple principles to be concerned with: Carbs with a high glycemic impact will cause a higher than needed insulin spike, resulting in an inevitable crash due to low blood sugar. Not every carb agrees with every person. It can be an allergic reaction, or some other ...


1

The Paleo framework starts from the perspective that most people will find that grains, legumes, dairy, being anti-social, getting no sunlight or exercise, and eating too many carbs for their exercise level will be problematic, for genetic and epigenetic reasons. That being said, here's the Paleo test at its most bare: Does it cause you gastrointestinal ...


1

I think the most effective strategy for the average person is to shop for their lean meats and veggies on a day that you have off work and prepare a large number of meals upfront and freeze some. To meet the minimum requirement for Paleo you can buy good ingredients at your local supermarket. If you want to go a little more down the proverbial rabbit hole ...


1

There are many differences between the two diets but I think one of most defining is the kind of animal foods you are encouraged to eat. The Paleo Diet emphasizes lean game meat. You're not going to be eating a marbled steak or bacon on the Paleo Diet. You're going to be eating things like salmon, halibut, venison, bison, organic free range beef, pork, ...


1

There are some proponents of this type of thinking such as the Warrior Diet and intermittent fasting (Eat Stop Eat). The premise is essentially the same as what you outlined, and many people have had success with this approach. Now, the dangerous thought process is to lump everyone into the same Calorie requirements. A weightlifter will need many more ...


1

I think it's most important what you DON'T eat. Rather than trying to re-enact caveman or hunter-gatherer dietary practice from whatever region and time period you can imagine to be most important, stick to this rule of thumb: avoid foods that are not available without processing and machinery, OR are plausibly linked to modern "diseases of civilization." ...



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