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12

While your abilities are still below lifting 160kg on any given weight, and you are performing the major powerlifting movements (squats, deadlifts, bench press, overhead press) then there isn't a major advantage one over the other. However, there are reasons why you would opt for Olympic plates: Standard bars are roughly 1" diameter, but there is enough ...


11

I've seen gyms with bumper plates and a lifting platform, clearly designed and intended for standard Olympic weightlifting style drops from chest or overhead, next to a sign saying that one should always configure the safety bars so that the bar doesn't hit the ground. This would of course damage the bar, make a tremendous amount more noise, and increase ...


5

In a world with "Don't" signs everywhere, if it's a problem with your gym then there will be a sign up saying not to drop. All my local gyms have the sign, but they are upstairs of other businesses. They also have thick mats in the free weight area but do not have bumper plates. I wouldn't be concerned with death stares from other gym goers if there's no ...


4

Octagonal plates interfere with proper strength training Octagonal plates have no reason to exist, and are actively counterproductive to working out properly. Octagonal or otherwise non-round plates make many fundamental barbell exercises from the floor--including cleans, snatches, and most importantly deadlifts--awkward. Upon putting plates down, the bar ...


2

If you've undergone strength building programs such as Strong Lift's 5X5, then, the only way you'll derive much benefits from a 45-lb plate is through high intensity and high repetitions/sets. While compound exercises are highly recommended, a lot of high repetitions/sets exercises are isolation movements (which allows some parts of the body to rest while ...


2

It's easy to make the argument that a plate has only one requirement: to weigh a certain amount. However, round plates enable a range of exercises that are impractical with any weight that has straight edges. Any floor exercise: i.e. rows, deadlifts, cleans Any exercise that requires rolling: i.e. barbell ab rollouts The difference is significant enough ...


2

Olympic bars are sturdier, heavier, are a well-known and well-followed standard, and allow you to do the fast lifts (cleans, jerks, snatches) much easier. It's easier and safer to load them with lots of weight. Standard bars are good, particularly to start with. If you can load it heavy, keep doing that. Don't mess with a good thing. If you run out of ...


2

Here's a link that describes the differences: http://www.newgrip.com/gain.html Basically standard bars are typically shorter (but you can get a 7' one) and can hold less overall weight prior to bending. I've lifted 400lbs standard, but have a slightly bent bar because of it and like lifts. Unless you're going heavy standard is a good beginner/intermediate ...


1

Given the equipment, you can do a lot of brutal Complexes. They won't get your strength up like real strength workouts will, but you can build some muscle and drop a lot of fat. Tuminello's weight plate complex is a good one to throw in your rotation. Perform the complex five times with only 90 seconds rest between each round. 6-8 Overhead Squat 6-8 ...



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