Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

You can do stretches, strengthening and breathing exercises to improve your posture. But you also have to become aware of your posture and find a way to interrupt prolonged sitting intervals with brief breaks. A good ergonomic chair is also helpful. Musculo-Skeletal Effects of Poor Sitting Posture: Poor sitting posture can create muscle imbalances over ...


12

No, don't support your weight on your arms Your hands simply aren't really made for supporting all that weight. If you ride for long like that, you'll see white or red areas on your hands where pressure has affected blood flow. It's also likely to exacerbate repetitive injuries from keyboarding. Gloves can only help a little. It's ok to be sitting very ...


12

Whenever we start something, we may find it boring. So, I would suggest you for a change of mind, i.e., try different sports. Running is good for you at this stage. You said you are unable to run continuously for more than 5 minutes. If I were you, I would rather follow the run/walk strategy. Run for 2 or 3 mins and walk for 1 min and continue this for some ...


8

There are several great posture building exercises. One is to lay on your stomach on the floor (or on a pillow or something if this makes your back hurt) with your arms above your head. Then raise your pelvis off the floor and one leg and the opposite arm (pelvis, right leg, left arm or pelvis, left leg, right arm). This can be extended into Supermans once ...


8

Adopt a combination of HIIT and strength training. Don't run 8km every day, it's completely useless and simply wears out your body for no good reason. You need to get your testosterone up to build muscle and reduce fat. I don't know if you're male or female, but it doesn't matter. The only way to do that is with exercise of very high intensity. Avoid ...


6

You definitely do NOT want to be supporting your weight with your arms on the bike for normal riding. One exception would be while on a time trial or triathlon bike, where it is best to support your weight with your upper body/arm skeleton structure to save your legs for running off the bike. During non-TT riding, your weight should be primarily on the ...


6

[Warning: Not really an answer to the question, but never the less an alternative...] I, for one, have given my office chair away! Or rather... I have replaced it with an exercise ball. I sit on the ball about half of the day and stand the rest of the day. The advantage of the ball as a chair compared with an ordinary office chair, is basically that ...


6

I get very tired and restless if I try to stand all day. If I got rid of my chair completely, I would be unhappy. In contrast, I feel awesome if my day is spent switching every hour between a standing desk, sitting desk, and reclining (on a couch with my feet up, preferably). Add frequent two-minute walks for added benefit. The problem is that we are ...


5

Since you are sitting all day, your hips are very tight as well as your scapula and chest. Thus the best solution is to perform exercises that open up these tight areas. I would focus a lot of pullovers, DB flys and other DB exercises (DB works a better range of motion) focusing on good posture doing the exercises; shoulders squeezed together and a big ...


5

Back exercises (lateral pull downs, deadlifts, back extensions, planks - make sure you work the opposing muscle - your abs and chest) will definitely help your posture. I used to never work my back and after I did a lot of my friends have said I look "taller". Honestly, I attribute the majority of that to working out giving me a lot of confidence which made ...


5

This depends on a couple of factors such as how tall your desk is and at what hight will you be able to have proper wrist position. When I purchased an exercise ball for this purpose, I would go to the store and get the biggest one they had (I'm 6'3"). This usually ended up being 30 inches (75cm) in diameter. I would suggest you do the same thing and get the ...


5

Take a look at this article on the "Third World Squat". It will help you identify what the problem areas are from sitting all day. The problem we see is this: Lack of strength in the posterior chain. You aren't using these muscles while sitting in a chair. Lack of flexibility in the hip flexors, calves, hamstrings Too much flexibility in the glutius ...


5

As far as I know, people who spend 8 hours stainding still (like shop personnel, assembly-line workers or standing security), have got problems too, mostly with their feet and legs: edemas, etc... I haven't conducted any serious research on it, but this makes sense. And in the beginning standing long will definitely be inconvenient or even painful. So in ...


5

Should you get rid of your office chair? - Not necessarily, especially if it is a good ergonomic chair that is adjusted to your work surface. A good chair gives your back support. Should you get up and move at regular intervals? - Yes, this is the key to keeping the negatives of prolonged sitting to a minimum. Should you add an exercise ball to alternate ...


5

I'm sorry you are having poor sleep! There are a few things you can try that have worked for me (I also have chronic neck issues). Rolling a towel and placing it under your neck while lying on your back, and rolling a few towels to place underneath your knees. If you feel uncomfortable on your back because your lower spine feels a pull, the rolled up ...


4

You are probably weak. Strength training is the solution. The best option would be to learn to lift weights. Starting Strength, a 3-times-a-week barbell program, is a good option. StrongLifts 5x5 is also commonly recommended. (See this question.) If you can't get access to a gym or barbell, you could look into bodyweight strength training instead. These ...


4

I highly agree with the strength training responses. I'll also add here that strength training (squats, overhead press, pull ups, etc.) also works out your core a lot, since you need to engage your core to stabilize your body during many of the exercises. You also mention that you run 8k every morning and do burpees afterward. I think you should read this ...


4

I was looking for a general guideline as I am to purchase an exercise-ball online. According to this article: Knees should be level or slightly lower than the pelvis - creating an angle of 90 degrees or slightly greater at the hips and knees (thighs parallel to ground or pointing down slightly). They also give a general guideline on choosing the ball ...


4

I'm in the same boat as you in regards to self-esteem, and occupation, I was told seeing a chiropractor will help with posture. Besides aligning your spine and telling you what your posture should be like, they also have exercises that you perform at home to help your muscles adjust to your natural posture. Most health insurances cover up to 12 ...


4

Don't Sit All Day Sitting hunched over a desk or laptop all day is not good for you. At a minimum, take regular breaks throughout the day: walk around the building, get some water, stretch your arms, roll out your neck and ankles, do a few lunges, sit in a third world squat for thirty seconds: Configure a standing desk, but don't stand all day either: ...


4

Don't get rid of the chair, but add a 16-ounce cup/mug to your desk. Learn to like and drink water. (Assuming you have an office kitchen or water fountain within walking distance ) When you run out, you'll get up to refill it. You'll also be up often to the bathroom. Water is also good for you. No apps or reminders needed to get you up, just an empty ...


3

Berin Loritsch posted this article a few times - 3rd World Squat - a position you can be in while home playing. What I would really recommend is balancing your work and home game play with a regular exercise program. Even if you sit up straight, being seated ALL DAY is not healthy - the impact to your hips, abs, etc. will hurt you in later years. Every 1/2 ...


3

What worked for me: Deadlifts and squats. (Pullups wouldn't hurt.) Getting beastly strong in your back and shoulders will A) make keeping proper posture easier, since it'll take a smaller amount of effort from bigger, stronger muscles and B) give you awesome practice, since deadlifts and squats require a strongly locked-in shoulders-back position. ...


3

If you have the muscles already developed, then you just need to continue to consciously make an effort to activate them when they should be activated. It sounds like you are also in the third phase of the example that I cited on Dancing and the core. You just need to keep it up so that it becomes second nature to you as well. I must confess, as a ...


3

It's hard for me to believe after running daily and doing a bunch of burpees, that your core is actually weak. And at 6'1" and 165 lbs, you are also not at all overweight. My guess is that at best you need to stand up straight and all of your belly fat problems will be solved. At worst, you are expressing negative body image issues that don't reflect your ...


3

Tai Chi is an excellent exercise for your posture. While not free, Bruce Frantzis' book, Opening the Energy Gates of Your Body, gives a very nice explanation of standing and sitting alignments as it relates to Tai Chi, as well as the flow of Chi. (It costs less on amazon if you can find it.) Since you are concerned about prolonged sitting with all its ...


2

You are getting older and need to augment your muscle mass to compensate for a slowing metabolism and/or extra weight carried from your youth. The body will adapt too well to any routine, and you've already hit a plateau with your cardio burpee routine. Focus on building some lean mass, which means you need some strength training (lift weights). ...


2

Couple of things: Are you running on a sidewalk, path or along the side of a road? Is the surface EVEN or slanted to one side? If it is the road it might be slightly slanted. If you run that same loop in the same direction and it is slanted, it can, over time, cause problems. Your hips and gait should be running on even surfaces. If the surface is ...


2

I'd suggest you have your gait studied by an expert. In most large cities you can find either a running coach or a specialist running store that can place you on a treadmill and record your stride on video. They can then offer tips that range from better footplacement, proper arm technique, to corrective shoes. Many amateur runners discount the importance ...


2

I've had jobs that require standing all day, so I have had long bouts of standing, with only some short breaks, and for the most part it's fine. The only thing is you have to be careful about the surface you're standing on. A perfectly flat surface, like a hardwood or linoleum floor, will be a killer. You'd definitely want to get an anti-fatigue mat to stand ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible