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Horizontal rows are generally better for correcting posture in deskbound workers. You should be looking to strengthen your rear-shoulder muscle-groups: Trapezius, scapular deltoid, rhomboids, scapular retractors. Any sort of horizontal row where you keep your elbows high will do the trick. In addition, try any of the following: Face-pulls Reverse-fly ...


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Workout program First off, I hope you're doing more than just the 5 exercises in the article you linked to. Those exercises are indeed a good set of exercises for the upper back, but good posture is only achieved through exercising the entire body! Intensity and volume parameters When deciding your set/rep ranges, one often asks "do I want to focus on ...


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I have not tried out 5x5 training myself but it consists of two full body-workouts: Workout A: Squat, Bench Press, Barbell Row Workout B: Squat, Overhead Press, Deadlift, You train three times a week, alternating workout A and B, and resting at least one day between two workouts. You never train two days in a row because your body needs days ...


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I recently purchased the Ikea Sit and Stand desk. It has been the solution I was looking for for a long time. You may want to give that one a shot. I got the electric one, which runs just under $500, but they also have a manual (with a lever), that pretty much does the same thing. I highly encourage anyone wanting to have the sitting and standing options on ...


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A few years ago, I stumbled upon someone who had written a book about pain management. I was intrigued, so, I picked up his book and readily use his exercises as part of my daily routine. Pete Egoscue professes that body alignment of the shoulders, hips, knees and ankles is critically important for posture as well as pain management. He states that if ...


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Ok so 2 very basic nonfunctional postures are in short the "donald duck" (butt sticking out, or overextension of the thoracic spine) and the "pink panther" (vice versa, the butt tucking under). These are sort of antagonistic and the stretches to "fix" this depend on which of the 2 you're more inclined to. One of the best resources on this topic imo is ...


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You should absolutely be doing some compound exercises for legs and lower back in order to improve posture. A 5-degree bend at the knees isn't going to empower a straight spine and a strong back, which are the primary facilitators of good posture. Squats and deadlifts are our saviors here. For even more engagement, you might even want to try some olympic ...


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Seems like everyone has giving you some good advice. However, I agree with JohnP the most because your health should be the most important aspect of your life. Find something you like, get up and take breaks frequently to drink some water throughout the day is cheap and possibly would give you the most health benefits while you are at work. Since you are ...


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The good news is that, while sitting will kill you, the research seems to show that as little as a two minute walk each hour largely reverses the effect. Either set yourself an alarm or get up and get coffee or water on the hour. Add the recommended 20 minutes of moderate exercise three times a week and you should be fine.


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I wouldn't go with duct tape, as that would most likely hurt when you remove it. ;) Kinesio tape is generally used to help support injured areas. I think it would be better to go this route: http://myfiveminuteyoga.com/303/take-your-shoulders-back-with-a-long-strap/ Reasons: It's not duct tape, so no skin tearing and no adhesive It's reusable It's ...


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You've been at a desk for many years, it may simply take a long time for your efforts to show progress. Beyond what you've tried, I would strongly recommend a standing desk. Part of your problem may be that you do all this work just to return to the same position (sitting at a desk) making it difficult for your body to change. That's conjecture obviously, ...



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