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5

At a first glimpse the standing desks seem like another "improvement" companies throw to an item to make customers upgrade and re-buy the same thing. Essentially it's just a desk, right? That's what I thought until I started my current job which provided me with a standing desk. My job is sedentary and very static. I experimented and on some days remained ...


4

According to Dr. Jos Verbeek of The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, "What we actually found is that most of it is, very much, just fashionable and not proven good for your health."


4

Horizontal rows are generally better for correcting posture in deskbound workers. You should be looking to strengthen your rear-shoulder muscle-groups: Trapezius, scapular deltoid, rhomboids, scapular retractors. Any sort of horizontal row where you keep your elbows high will do the trick. In addition, try any of the following: Face-pulls Reverse-fly ...


3

Workout program First off, I hope you're doing more than just the 5 exercises in the article you linked to. Those exercises are indeed a good set of exercises for the upper back, but good posture is only achieved through exercising the entire body! Intensity and volume parameters When deciding your set/rep ranges, one often asks "do I want to focus on ...


2

I recently purchased the Ikea Sit and Stand desk. It has been the solution I was looking for for a long time. You may want to give that one a shot. I got the electric one, which runs just under $500, but they also have a manual (with a lever), that pretty much does the same thing. I highly encourage anyone wanting to have the sitting and standing options on ...


2

A recent meta-analysis of 23 published studies is MacEwen, MacDonald, and Burr, "A systematic review of standing and treadmill desks in the workplace," Preventative Medicine 70(January 2015):50-58. The article is here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.011 Quoting from the paper's summary: Treadmill desks led to the greatest improvement in ...


2

Anecdotal, I've been using a standing desk for about a year. I write software so it used to be ~8hrs sitting. Now I'm always standing. Dont notice a difference tbh. Some days my legs and lower back are sore if I happened to walk to work that day. If anything, now when I sit for a long time my lower back feels some soreness on getting up.


1

It's probably bad form to just post a link as an answer, but honestly I don't think anyone could explain this better than Paul Ingraham on his blog PainScience, with the references and studies to back everything up: https://www.painscience.com/articles/posture.php and https://www.painscience.com/articles/structuralism.php Regarding braces (this is about ...


1

You should absolutely be doing some compound exercises for legs and lower back in order to improve posture. A 5-degree bend at the knees isn't going to empower a straight spine and a strong back, which are the primary facilitators of good posture. Squats and deadlifts are our saviors here. For even more engagement, you might even want to try some olympic ...



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