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To me, it sounds like you also need to be working on your upper thoracic mobility. This should also help with the hyperlordosis as the two areas are connected. Between them both, you can really correct your posture. When you warm up, also make sure your shoulders are properly warmed up as well. A couple warmup routines include (just pick one to use): ...


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I have not tried out 5x5 training myself but it consists of two full body-workouts: Workout A: Squat, Bench Press, Barbell Row Workout B: Squat, Overhead Press, Deadlift, You train three times a week, alternating workout A and B, and resting at least one day between two workouts. You never train two days in a row because your body needs days ...


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I find that posture comes from strength in the right areas. A strong back tends to pull your shoulders back, which pushes your chest up. Your abdominal muscles create a solid wall up front, which keeps you upright. A strong lower back also helps to rock your chest up and keep you upright. A lot of poor posture is caused by anterior pelvic tilt, typically ...


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Yep, it's pretty do-able. I just did one right now to be sure. There's actually a bunch of muscles involved since you're locking your legs straight to help on the lever aspect. The exercise is referred to as a straight leg situp. Off the top of my head, I think some general full body conditioning stuff would be good, particularly the flutter kick, turkish ...


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Balance I think the key to good posture is balance. The balance between muscle length or flexibility, strength and joint alignment all contribute to a rather effortless posture. Any imbalance requires additional energy to compensate for a joint or muscle's restriction as part of the body works against the pull of gravity. Weight Bearing Well aligned ...


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A few years ago, I stumbled upon someone who had written a book about pain management. I was intrigued, so, I picked up his book and readily use his exercises as part of my daily routine. Pete Egoscue professes that body alignment of the shoulders, hips, knees and ankles is critically important for posture as well as pain management. He states that if ...


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Ok so 2 very basic nonfunctional postures are in short the "donald duck" (butt sticking out, or overextension of the thoracic spine) and the "pink panther" (vice versa, the butt tucking under). These are sort of antagonistic and the stretches to "fix" this depend on which of the 2 you're more inclined to. One of the best resources on this topic imo is ...


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Okay - you're asking a challenging question, without diagnosis etc. it's hard to answer, regardless I'll give it a shot: Let's get you a solid core first: hollow body hold, planks (back, front and side), L-Raise progression (aiming for straddle raises for hip and lumbar stability) Let's open up your hips & associated connectives: Seated Cross Legged ...


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I wouldn't go with duct tape, as that would most likely hurt when you remove it. ;) Kinesio tape is generally used to help support injured areas. I think it would be better to go this route: http://myfiveminuteyoga.com/303/take-your-shoulders-back-with-a-long-strap/ Reasons: It's not duct tape, so no skin tearing and no adhesive It's reusable It's ...


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There is something called as horizontal shrugs; which can be seen in this link; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3cupvX9mv4 This can also be conducted while lying on a bench too. It is a great exercise, and you don't need much weight to do it. Instead, try to go for high reps, such as 10-20; and hold that weight for a little moment at the top (like 1 full ...


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Some ideas you might want to try: Sit in the aforementioned hideous chair but put a lumbar support of some type in there. A pillow wedged between the small of your back and the chair will help to some degree. If you google "Lumbar Support Pad" you'll see commercial versions you may want to consider purchasing; they're better than pillows that never seem to ...


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Try stretching your soleus out a bit. The correct angle I've been taught is roughly 5-10% forward lean. It affects a lot, from heal strike to minimizing vertical bob. I'm not sure if you're bobbing around a lot but any energy sending you up and down is basically wasted. The catch is you don't want to lean forward at the waist or back, you want to lean ...



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