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24

You will find a lot of advice on the Internet about this one, most of it is not demonstrated. This is what the British Journal of Sports Medicine says about it: Recent research suggests that the timing of the intake of protein related to exercise may be more important than the total amount of protein consumed in a day. In the case of resistance ...


23

Actually, the idea that the most important time to eat protein is right after a training session has not real scientific validity. It's a great marketing claim used by shake manufacturers to impress upon you the need to buy their convenience powders. Your body does not suddenly start building muscle immediately after a workout. Protein metabolism is a very ...


17

According to research (Source), the body only needs 0.36g of protein per pound each day for maintenance. In 2009, the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine released an abstract supporting 0.5g to 0.8g of protein per pound each day as sufficient (Source). You can take in a significant amount more ...


16

The main difference is in the "purity", how much lactose and fat is left with the protein after filtering. Whey isolate usually contains around 90% protein and whey concentrate is more like 70-85%. If you have trouble digesting the lactose or are trying to minimize carbohydrate content, then whey isolate would be a good choice. Otherwise, it probably ...


15

I suggest you read this article from the Australian Institute of Sports. About halfway down the page it has a section titled: Protein – are vegetarian diets adequate? There is too much info to quote there so I'll put it in point form, but I suggest you read the whole article: Although most vegetarian athletes meet or exceed recommendations for total ...


14

There is a common saying that abs are made in the kitchen. Having a strong core and abdominal muscles is not enough to get "six-pack" or "washboard" abs, because there will likely be a large layer of fat over the abdominal region. In fact, you aren't able to really see six-pack abs until you are in the 8-15% range of Body Fat Percentage. Furthermore, the ...


12

There's some contradiction as to what's the most important part: timing, quantity etc. I have found pretty good studies that indicate that the post-workout shake doesn't really make a difference and then there are studies like the one Duopixel quotes that suggest the opposite. There are also many variables even regarding the post-workout shake: with/without ...


11

You can gain muscle while losing weight, but really only in specific circumstances, which you most likely don't fall into. You need to be fairly obese to start with, and eating the correct nutrients to support the lifting that you are doing. However, you are most likely not in that category, since you have been training regularly already. If you are in a ...


10

There is no "timing" for consuming protein. There is not a single study that demonstrates eating protein at a specific time will somehow boost recovery or muscle gain. What's far more important is just your protein intake on average, over time. Your body is actually quite adept at regulating your protein metabolism. You have something called an amino acid ...


9

I've spoken to 2 sports nutritionists on this very subject over the past year, and both told me that protein is ineffective in post-recovery workouts, that the muscles can't absorb protein after working out. They said to eat a high-protein breakfast instead. They also said that carbs are all that count for recovery, and that you should eat carbs ...


9

1- Why does it matter how long protein digestion takes? is it because we do not want it to be released faster than body can absorb or needs? It really doesn't. You really should only be drinking protein powder post workout and getting most of your protein from actual food -meat, fish, eggs, dairy products etc. I only recommend protein powder outside ...


9

Milk doesn't have a lot of protein. For example, whole milk is 49% fat, 30% carbs (sugar), and a measly 21% protein. If you want to increase the protein intake then you want to eat protein rich foods such as: Lean meats Protein powder Egg whites Fish/Seafood Soy Greek yogurt Here are some protein sources; note not all of them are high protein but they ...


9

To best understand the answer to this, you have to understand that our bodies need Essential Amino Acids. In short any nutrient that is essential is one that your body cannot create on its own. There are a number of vitamins and minerals that fall in this category, but that is a topic for another question. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. ...


9

Divide your dose. Have some before and some after your workout. Unlike fat and carbohydrates your body can't store protein. If it doesn't get absorbed it gets passed through your digestive tract, your liver, your kidneys, etc. This not only wastes protein/ supplements and money it also taxes your machine by forcing it to process something that it can't ...


9

184g of Protein does not sound unreasonable to me for someone who is actively exercising. It can be a lot, but it only amounts to ~740 Cal of your daily consumption. So you will need to be eating more than that overall. First, I would check your math. Most lean meat has about 25g / 4oz serving--or as much space on your plate as a closed fist. A chicken ...


8

A whey protein shake would be an easy way to get protein.


8

The answer depends on what your overall goals are, and what you are doing with your training. So, let's look at a couple of different people with different goals: Jack is a marathon runner. He runs for miles on end, and is into endurance. Jack needs to keep his electrolytes up, make sure he has carbs for energy. He still needs protein, but his muscles ...


8

.5g protein per pound weight is for sedentary individuals to maintain muscle mass. Losing muscle mass is not necessarily a fast process, but there are ill effects over time. If you are exercising, you will need more protein. I would increase your protein intake. It has a double advantage of being more satiating (allowing less room for junk food) and ...


8

First, most recommendations about frequency of eating and timing of eating don't have any appreciable real benefit. Whether you get all your daily nutrition in 3 meals or 6 only matters in what helps you stick to your nutrition plan. If you do better eating small meals throughout the day, do it. If you do better with multiple larger meals, go for it. ...


7

A good breakfast for me can consist of a 2-3 scrambled eggs mixed with half a can (~150g) cottage cheese. Spice it up with some tabasco sauce and it's totally edible, and it takes about 5 mins to make. Another option is to just eat a whole can of cottage cheese straight (perhaps mixed with something sweet like a splash of kool aid). That's nearly 40 grams ...


7

Your best bet is to split it into even doses throughout the day. Your body will make good use of it. Now, if you have some before bed, it won't hurt. Essentially, at night when you sleep, two types of adaptations will happen (assuming you have disrupted homeostasis): Starting when you hit REM sleep, your testosterone levels will peak and remain at that ...


7

Tinned tuna, mackeral and sardines. Not typically seen as a breakfast dish, but they are healthy and filling. Have protein and omega oils. Very convenient, just open and go. Depending where you are they often come with a range of different sauces. Do not eat at your desk at work.


7

Define waste. You may or may not gain weight, but there are other considerations at play. Excessive caloric intake will probably cause you to gain weight, plus there are other metabolic considerations from the reduction in exercise that may have an affect as well. When you have an excessive amount of protein intake, then you start placing a larger burden ...


6

I was able to put together a day with about 1400 calories and 148g protein. I have added a little bit of intensity to most of the meals. I love chobani greek yogurt and edamame the way they are, so I didn't add intensity to them. Also, 1400 calories is probably too low for you, so go ahead and adjust this to reach your calorie goal. Please note, I am not ...


6

If the protein powder is added to hot liquid, it won't mix and it does release a gas as it cooks. I've tried it before in one of those covered shakers with a whisk ball built in. Hot protein mess spewed all over the counter as the cap flew off due to the added pressure. Now, you can apply the same approach that chefs use to flavor their meringues with ...


6

Add powdered protein (whey, soy, whatever your preference) to your drink (almond milk is fine). Crack a few eggs in a pan and scramble them (takes <5 mins total). High protein cereal. Several types exist including one by Kashi More whole grains- Oatmeal works well for example. Don't add sugar to your meal or drink as sugar is an appetite stimulant


6

The real answer to your question is probably that the supposed superiority (for bodybuilding) of these types of protein sources has been determined by generations of bodybuilders using trial and error. I think, as the rest of this answer is intended to illustrate, that the number of variables in evaluating all differences between even a few different ...


6

For the most part this is speculation based on what I learned as from my college bio classes (which I took recently as a I just graduate as a bioengineer). Obviously, there are circumstances in which mixing your protein into a shake may cause it to lose effectiveness. For instance, a shake with high bacterial content, such as if you put yogurt or something ...


6

Mechanical agitation can denature proteins, so that the proteins will no longer function correctly in their original state. But, it's likely the proteins are already denatured as a consequence of manufacturing. And, your digestive system will break down the proteins into amino acids anyway, in order to rebuild them into new proteins. Mechanical agitation ...


6

I recently stumbled on a great article that talks about protein consumption for the purposes of building muscle (recovery included). It's "The Myth of 1g/lb: Optimal Protein Intake for Bodybuilders". To make a long story short, there was a clinical study to determine how much protein was necessary to build muscle. It is still based on body weight, but the ...



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