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9

Divide your dose. Have some before and some after your workout. Unlike fat and carbohydrates your body can't store protein. If it doesn't get absorbed it gets passed through your digestive tract, your liver, your kidneys, etc. This not only wastes protein/ supplements and money it also taxes your machine by forcing it to process something that it can't ...


9

184g of Protein does not sound unreasonable to me for someone who is actively exercising. It can be a lot, but it only amounts to ~740 Cal of your daily consumption. So you will need to be eating more than that overall. First, I would check your math. Most lean meat has about 25g / 4oz serving--or as much space on your plate as a closed fist. A chicken ...


5

Whey protein is used to gain muscle mass fast. Its a supplement and has very little side effects. The Brand is important because some people see more improvement with diffirent brands(needs to be verified). But ON is the leading provider by far, having the most reputation among bodybuilders. How much: There is no universal answer to this particular ...


4

@muffin, the responses from Dan Andrews and backinshapebuddy are the most important things to continue. From personal experience, the signs of kidney damage really are that subtle that you'll think you are healthy until your kidneys have finally had enough. Also, the foods you eat most likely have more than adequate protein. I was active, ate relatively ...


4

As a sprinter, you are using mostly anaerobic energy systems. The adaptations that your body will produce in response to your sport means an increase in fast-twitch muscle fibers, which are typically larger than slow twitch (which are higher in distance runners). This means larger size, but may not mean heavier weight. As a sprinter, you want fast-twitch. ...


4

To answer your question specifically: it doesn't matter. Studies show that the average amount of protein taken in over a given period of time(days, weeks)is what matters far more than getting your whey in before or after. The body does not really become magically more efficient at using protein after a workout. As long as you're hitting your daily intake ...


4

Having a protein before your workout will allow you to have more energy, resulting in your workouts feeling stronger, but you will not burn as much fat when you workout. After your workouts, it is commonly accepted that your body acts like a sponge for about an hour while your muscles attempt to collect nutrients to repair what was torn down during the ...


4

Chicken has per 100g (3.5 oz): 165 Calories 4g fat 0g Carbs 31g protein You'll find that what is cheap really depends on what is most common where you live. In other words, if you live in a country or town where seafood is plentiful it may very well be a cheaper form of protein. Unfortunately, some areas of the world it seems that all food is ...


4

Protein shakes are a food supplement, not a weight loss or muscle growth magic potion. They are only useful if you are not meeting your protein requirements through other methods. Protein shakes do not contain vitamins, minerals or fibre, which is contained in other whole food sources of protein and all of which are vital for good health. What they do ...


3

If you eat milk and eggs, then whey protein supplements/powders are permissible. As far as amount, you want between 1-2g of protein per kg of body weight, leaning more towards the higher side. So I would recommend 75-100g of protein per day. (Not all at one time, but spread out). Quinoa is an excellent grain source, it's 18g protein per cooked cup, ...


3

The yellow part is referred to as the yolk. It's actually not as bad as the rap it gets, although eating 12 egg whites at a time is bit high. But I'll leave that alone for now. A google search for "cheap sources of protein" will give you a whole flood of answers, pretty much all of which are cheap in part because they are whole or less wasteful. A post from ...


3

First off, you shouldn't eat less protein on rest days. The muscles get damaged during workout, but they get repaired during rest, so you need the protein for that, as well as for building new muscle. That said 1g per pound of lean body mass would be good if you want to keep all your muscle. With 75kg and a presumed 15% bodyfat you'd have ~64kg (141lbs) of ...


3

Preparing chicken breasts are probably the fastest thing ever, and I really do not think anything is much cheaper. But other good sources are: Cottage cheese, skim milk, Skyr, eggs and tuna (stolen from other answers). From (Berin Loritsch) you could look into local sources of cheap and good protein. Back to the breasts! Buy a bunch of breasts. ...


2

Well, you've kind of asked the million dollar question, as there haven't been any really definitive studies (That I am aware of) specifying exactly how much protein is needed for training, and especially when related to fat loss, as that can be highly individual specific. This study examined nitrogen balance and lean body mass preservation related to ...


2

I've always heard a good starting point for building muscle is 1g protein per lb of lean body mass (or about 2.2g/kg). Lean body mass is your percentage of bodyfat subtracted from your weight. Take this with a grain of salt, however, because some people may have higher protein needs than others. Anyway, take a 200lb (91kg) man with 20% BF for example. ...


2

There are a couple articles I can recommend, one is a nice summary article by Greg Nuckols and a more in-depth article by the Examine.com guys. You'll still see recommendations in terms of body mass--or technically speaking desired body mass. Greg Nuckols recommends .82g / lb or 1.8g / kg body weight based on studies sited in this article. The examine.com ...


2

To gain weight generally requires you to gain both fat and muscle. The body generally doesn't partition all calories to the muscle (unless you are in your teens with a very lucky hormonal profile or you are taking steroids). The general rule is 1 lb of fat for 1 lb of muscle (1:1 partitioning), also you will probably gain a lb of water and glycogen. If ...


2

First of all, get rid of the idea of putting on 10kg in 6 months without gaining fat. A six-pack-neurosis is not your friend when you're trying to build muscle. No biggie though, fat is easily cut once you've got the muscle base to work it off. Second, your stats are very atypical for an intermediate lifter (see my comment above). If you don't hit the ...


2

The choice of whether to use protein shakes, how much, and how often is primarily a nutrition question. Strength training does increase your need for protein, however there are several recommendations that are simply overkill. I recommend reading a good primer on protein requirements called "The Three Laws of Protein"--which is designed for people who ...


1

6: No, it it is not good if you eat oats every meal of the day. "Whey" protein is nothing magical. It's just a particular food that has a rather decent nutritional profile and there happens to be a ton of the stuff because of dairy production overall. Ballpark you should shoot for 1 gram or so per pound of body weight. Some folks say half as much, some ...


1

First: celiac disease is an autoimmune response to consuming gluten which is found in wheat flour and certain other grains. Whey protein, eggs, casein etc. do not contain any gluten whatsoever. By definition it can't be celiac disease. However, your symptoms are consistent with an allergic reaction to something in the ingredients for Dymatize Elite. The ...


1

Dieting Speed: You lost about 0.5kg (1lb) per week, which is generally recommended for slower diets. The benefits of dieting slowly are that there's virtually no muscle loss (you really only lose fat) and better carryover of good habits to the time after the diet. Also, it's easier to stay sane and keep going, as you're probably not starving throughout the ...


1

I too was in a similar dilemma when I gave up protein shakes. I tried eating way too much protein from a specific source. A protein shake is a supplement, a thing that makes up for a deficiency. The thing is that in today's world, especially in first world countries, protein is everywhere and its easily obtainable through eating whole nutrition dense ...


1

Using a good Whey protein shake can be a great way to supplement your protein intake. you can check bodybuilding.com and read-up about good reputable brands & their products,, a few that come to mind are Muscletech, Optimum Nutrion, BSN, Gaspari etc... Follow the instructions on the container. Since your natural & this IS NOT DRUGS, as long as ...


1

The idea that there is a certain amount of protein a person can absorb with in a set period of time is false according to this article. In short, the author points out that if it is true that we can only absorb 30g of protein in one sitting, as is widely accepted to be true by many, we would all be excreting the excess amount of food undigested. Since that ...


1

Yes protein from beans, pulses, lentils and nuts. I wasn't sure on the amount, but found this link http://breakingmuscle.com/nutrition/how-to-build-muscle-mass-on-a-plant-based-diet Which I think you may find useful. It says about 1 gram per pound of body weight for example a 200lb bodybuilder requires 200gms of protein a day. This is not my area of ...


1

I've also seen numbers in that range, there are a couple things you may consider: LBM (lean body mass) is a much better number to base calculations from because fat tissue has a tiny fraction of the protein needs that muscle has. LBM is not really correlated to BMI. So for an example, if we imagine you have a body fat % of 20% you have LBM = 73.6kg which ...


1

Muhammad, Eat the yolk part (yellow part) of the eggs; it's very good for you. The yolk actually increases the good cholesterol in your body ( this, this) as well as provide a host of other nutrients such as Vitamin A, which helps your eye sight Vitamin B, which is good for your brain, energy, etc Vitamin D for strong bones and good skin Vitamin K ...


1

As much as we know about the human body, we know precious little about why and how hair turns grey (or white). The general idea appears to be that the follicles eventually stop producing pigment, leaving the resulting hairs white. When that happens, however, is a pretty complex thing, partly dependent on genetics, partly on environmental factors. A few known ...


1

Protein intake is used to help with muscle growth. Muscles weigh more so yes, in that way it could be said that it might make you gain some weight. But if your workouts are that intense, I would not worry about that and read the label on back of the protein powder too - some have added sugar. This article has a good guideline for how to start figuring out ...



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