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9

184g of Protein does not sound unreasonable to me for someone who is actively exercising. It can be a lot, but it only amounts to ~740 Cal of your daily consumption. So you will need to be eating more than that overall. First, I would check your math. Most lean meat has about 25g / 4oz serving--or as much space on your plate as a closed fist. A chicken ...


7

Divide your dose. Have some before and some after your workout. Unlike fat and carbohydrates your body can't store protein. If it doesn't get absorbed it gets passed through your digestive tract, your liver, your kidneys, etc. This not only wastes protein/ supplements and money it also taxes your machine by forcing it to process something that it can't ...


6

I would suggest keep doing what you're doing. You lost 20 pounds in 17 weeks. That's great progress. That progress will necessarily slow down, though. Ab visibility is largely related to body fat percentage. My guess is that you're somewhere around 20% body fat (http://www.builtlean.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/body-fat-percentage-men.jpg). (I'm assuming ...


5

Whey protein is used to gain muscle mass fast. Its a supplement and has very little side effects. The Brand is important because some people see more improvement with diffirent brands(needs to be verified). But ON is the leading provider by far, having the most reputation among bodybuilders. How much: There is no universal answer to this particular ...


4

Years later but for anyone who reads this. Moesef's answer is half correct but completely misleading. Why would the breakdown of protein reduce it's effectiveness? You can buy them pre mixed off the shelf, they've been sitting there way longer than a few hours. Any breakdown of the protein will just turn them into amino acids, and like moesef said that ...


4

I don't know what your body fat percentage is but you need to have around 10% to have visible abs, mine is lower and I still barely see them. One way to make your abs more visible is to do actual weighted ab exercises. Most fit people can do well over 20 situps which is no longer stimulating hypertrophy, if you try situps with some weight you may see ...


4

As a sprinter, you are using mostly anaerobic energy systems. The adaptations that your body will produce in response to your sport means an increase in fast-twitch muscle fibers, which are typically larger than slow twitch (which are higher in distance runners). This means larger size, but may not mean heavier weight. As a sprinter, you want fast-twitch. ...


4

First of all, this all depends on the protein he is taking and some other life style aspects. My initial answer is that this is not a problem because supplements are simply meant to supplement your diet. getting 30 grams of protein from a shake isn't really different than getting 30 grams of protein from chicken or any other source of protein for that ...


4

@muffin, the responses from Dan Andrews and backinshapebuddy are the most important things to continue. From personal experience, the signs of kidney damage really are that subtle that you'll think you are healthy until your kidneys have finally had enough. Also, the foods you eat most likely have more than adequate protein. I was active, ate relatively ...


3

First off, you shouldn't eat less protein on rest days. The muscles get damaged during workout, but they get repaired during rest, so you need the protein for that, as well as for building new muscle. That said 1g per pound of lean body mass would be good if you want to keep all your muscle. With 75kg and a presumed 15% bodyfat you'd have ~64kg (141lbs) of ...


3

The yellow part is referred to as the yolk. It's actually not as bad as the rap it gets, although eating 12 egg whites at a time is bit high. But I'll leave that alone for now. A google search for "cheap sources of protein" will give you a whole flood of answers, pretty much all of which are cheap in part because they are whole or less wasteful. A post from ...


3

Having a protein before your workout will allow you to have more energy, resulting in your workouts feeling stronger, but you will not burn as much fat when you workout. After your workouts, it is commonly accepted that your body acts like a sponge for about an hour while your muscles attempt to collect nutrients to repair what was torn down during the ...


3

Some quick research returned the following articles: Who Knew Preventing Kidney Stones Was this Easy? "In the 1990s when the Atkins diet reached huge popularity, critics claimed that high protein intake leads to kidney stones. This turned out to be a complete myth, but the misinformation is still being circulated. Although protein restricted diets are ...


3

I've been using protein shakes for a few years, not daily but perhaps 3 times a week after heavy weight training (as opposed to after cardio, for example). I was told by a personal trainer many years back that people do damage their kidneys because they use excessive amounts. He said it's usually those entering competitions that have the mindset of "if HE is ...


3

I think you need to check your math. In his Nutrition section, he is saying you'll be getting 6 meals per day, with 35 - 45g of protein per meal. That is 210 - 270 grams per day. At your weight (139lbs), he is saying to get 2780 calories per day. His macro ratio gives you 973 protein calories, 1390 carb calories, and 417 fat calories. Protein contains ...


2

Yes, I don't see why not. Some protein shakes combine the two (or all three). Some samples: Hydro Builder (Protein + creatine) and Hydro Whey (Protein + BCAA).


2

I looked at the ingredients in the P90X Recovery Formula and they included a number of known elements: Dextrose & Maltodextrin: a sugar to help provide an insulin spike (40g carbs / serving) Whey Protein Concentrate: protein (10g / serving) Citric Acid: vitamin C L-Carnatine & L-Glutamine: Amino acids associated with fat burning and recovery ...


2

First of all, get rid of the idea of putting on 10kg in 6 months without gaining fat. A six-pack-neurosis is not your friend when you're trying to build muscle. No biggie though, fat is easily cut once you've got the muscle base to work it off. Second, your stats are very atypical for an intermediate lifter (see my comment above). If you don't hit the ...


2

I've always heard a good starting point for building muscle is 1g protein per lb of lean body mass (or about 2.2g/kg). Lean body mass is your percentage of bodyfat subtracted from your weight. Take this with a grain of salt, however, because some people may have higher protein needs than others. Anyway, take a 200lb (91kg) man with 20% BF for example. ...


2

If you eat milk and eggs, then whey protein supplements/powders are permissible. As far as amount, you want between 1-2g of protein per kg of body weight, leaning more towards the higher side. So I would recommend 75-100g of protein per day. (Not all at one time, but spread out). Quinoa is an excellent grain source, it's 18g protein per cooked cup, ...


2

To gain weight generally requires you to gain both fat and muscle. The body generally doesn't partition all calories to the muscle (unless you are in your teens with a very lucky hormonal profile or you are taking steroids). The general rule is 1 lb of fat for 1 lb of muscle (1:1 partitioning), also you will probably gain a lb of water and glycogen. If ...


1

I've also seen numbers in that range, there are a couple things you may consider: LBM (lean body mass) is a much better number to base calculations from because fat tissue has a tiny fraction of the protein needs that muscle has. LBM is not really correlated to BMI. So for an example, if we imagine you have a body fat % of 20% you have LBM = 73.6kg which ...


1

There are a couple articles I can recommend, one is a nice summary article by Greg Nuckols and a more in-depth article by the Examine.com guys. You'll still see recommendations in terms of body mass--or technically speaking desired body mass. Greg Nuckols recommends .82g / lb or 1.8g / kg body weight based on studies sited in this article. The examine.com ...


1

Muhammad, Eat the yolk part (yellow part) of the eggs; it's very good for you. The yolk actually increases the good cholesterol in your body ( this, this) as well as provide a host of other nutrients such as Vitamin A, which helps your eye sight Vitamin B, which is good for your brain, energy, etc Vitamin D for strong bones and good skin Vitamin K ...


1

Well, you've kind of asked the million dollar question, as there haven't been any really definitive studies (That I am aware of) specifying exactly how much protein is needed for training, and especially when related to fat loss, as that can be highly individual specific. This study examined nitrogen balance and lean body mass preservation related to ...


1

As much as we know about the human body, we know precious little about why and how hair turns grey (or white). The general idea appears to be that the follicles eventually stop producing pigment, leaving the resulting hairs white. When that happens, however, is a pretty complex thing, partly dependent on genetics, partly on environmental factors. A few known ...


1

Protein intake is used to help with muscle growth. Muscles weigh more so yes, in that way it could be said that it might make you gain some weight. But if your workouts are that intense, I would not worry about that and read the label on back of the protein powder too - some have added sugar. This article has a good guideline for how to start figuring out ...


1

Protein bars and shakes are supplements to normal food intake. If you are tracking your calorie intake and expenditure (which you should be for weight changes), and you are finding your calorie intake requirements are making it hard for your regular diet to meet your macronutrient requirements, then there is no problem taking a supplement. However, there ...


1

No, your stomach is not like a queue-dequeue data structure. As food enters your stomach it gets disolved and decomposed by a number of enzymes that all work on micro- and macro-nutrients in different ways. Depending on the size, structure, and in some cases your genetic make-up these will all be processed at different speeds in different ways. On top of ...


1

I know calculating sounds like the right way to approach your question but theory is theory, de facto things are often different. I don't remember reading about any bodybuilder who promotes beans and lentils over meat. I have heard many times that beans and lentils are very high in protein but nothing replaces meat. Proteins from beans and proteins from ...



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