Hot answers tagged

7

A typical 10lb bag of ON whey protein costs ~$115 USD. There are 149 servings (1 scoop = 1 serving) in a bag. So 24 grams of protein (with negligible carbs and fat) costs $0.77 USD. I don't think you'll find anything cheaper anywhere. And if you do, let me know.


7

Let's start with some foundation in the order of importance: Energy Balance (Calories in vs. Calories out) Macros (amount of protein, carbohydrates, fat) Micros/Supplements (vitamins / minerals and sports supplements) Meal timing (how often you eat and how close to training) Energy Balance This is the simplest thing: You eat less than you burn in a ...


6

Eggs! A dozen in USA costs around $3 that is 6 grams of proteins for $0.041 per gram. Although it doesn't beat $0.03 per gram in Eric's answer but its close and eggs are not for $3 everywhere. Knowing which country you belong to, this price can be significantly lower. I am from Canada. I just bought a dozen eggs for $2.64 Wohoo, that makes it $0.03 ...


5

A huge reality you need to embrace is that if you do not make sizable time and adjustments for your health now, you will make time and adjustments for long term and generally incurable health problems in the future. You might be "busy" now with life commitments, but being on a kidney dialysis machine will make you even "busier". This isn't about having a ...


4

Apart from your general protein need, you need some to repair muscles after training, so your protein intake should be slightly increased. This website states a need of 1.2 to 1.4 gram per kg bodyweight. That is not much, the average western diet easily covers even the strength athletes protein need. So don't worry about it.


4

Check out these resources for more specifics about the supplements: Glutamine -- not shown to increase muscle mass, but shown to lower inflammation (i.e. recovery). Timing doesn't matter. No more than 5g any time of day. (Brown Rice) Protein -- protein is protein. There is minimal increased uptake during and post training. One book recommended 10-15g ...


3

Protein supplements exist for one reason, and one reason only; If your usual diet doesn't provide you with enough protein to properly facilitate reaching your goals, you can add protein supplements to reach the target amount of protein per day/week. As it stands, the question isn't answerable due to lack of information. You need to find out how much ...


3

No, protein supplements are made of whey protein, which is the liquid remaining after milk has been curdled and strained. It's not a synthetic product of any kind. I haven't tried the Gold brand in particular, but I can see that it's being sold by some of the most reputable sites (including here in Norway), so I see no reason doubt its quality. Your father ...


3

While once considered essential in bodybuilding, the importance of nutrient timing has been severely downplayed in the last few years since plenty of studies fail to show significant results and the anabolic window of increased muscle protein synthesis is quite a lot longer than used to be thought. As in, it won't matter that much whether you take your ...


3

Beans! A 1-pound bag of dry beans can easily be found for $1, and contains about 100 grams of protein. $0.01 per gram beats pretty much any animal source. Of course, you can't eat raw beans, so this source requires some kitchen work.


3

Will eating lots of eggs and peanut butter, and drinking a lot of milk help you bulk up? Yes, however I hope that you are not just eating these for your breakfast, lunch and dinner. If you seriously want to gain muscle mass, then consider calculating your TDEE and add 200~500 calories(this is known caloric surplus). Next your protein intake should be 1g ...


3

To lose weight, you do not need to eat "healthy" or eat vegetables. Weight gain and loss comes down to the energy balance equation, or net calories (weight changes) = calories in - calories out. The reason exercise helps to lose weight is because it increases the calories out number, but it is not strictly necessary with good diet (though it will increase ...


2

I think tuna is a very, very good source for not much money. The type I get is in water, of course, and it's 90 calories per tin, with 20 grams of protein. There's only 1 gram of fat with all that protein, and then an extra calorie from something haha. My lunch is 2 cans of tuna plus a deli sandwich with about 30 g of protein in it. So I get 70 g of ...


2

Protein shakes are mainly based on whey protein, which is the leftover when milk is coagulated during the process of cheese production. It is the same type of protein that you'll find in a lot of dairy products like milk, ricotta, etc. As such, there is no reason to fear protein shakes. However, I am reluctant to recommend using protein powder. As with ...


2

You are ok with the flax seed, as it is a complete protein. It's not as high a source of protein as beef, as it comes in at 19 grams protein per 100 grams (Beef is 26, chicken is 30). The common wisdom is that protein is protein as far as the body is concerned, and to a large extent that is true. A plant protein produces many (but not all) of the same ...


2

Protein powders are not different than "natural" high protein foods such as cottage cheese, poultry, eggs, etc in terms of "being natural". It's sort of real food with other ingredients removed so you'll be able to consume a lot of protein without consuming other organic compounds. In addition, I actually read about a few researches which state that high ...


1

Any protein you get from meat and dairy. You are 14 years old and not fully developed, which means that if you are even semi-aware of what you eat, you'll reap huge benefits. Just eat what your parents serve you, and finish your vegetables!


1

None. There will never be a point where you have to consume supplements in order to reach your protein (or any other) goals, but it may make it easier.


1

Your body will absorb nearly all the protein that you consume in a meal. Depending on the source, your body will absorb anywhere from 1.3g per hour on the low side (Eggs come in around 3g/hour), up to 8-10g per hour on the high side (whey protein). (Unfortunately, I do not have access to anything but the abstract rather than the full study). Protein stays in ...


1

You still need adequate protein, but for endurance training, it's not quite as important as it is for strength training, i.e. if you don't get protein immediately it's not world ending. As brentw points out, the ratio of 3:1 or 4:1 carbs to protein is a good mix. If your vegetarian definition is loose enough to allow dairy products, then milk or chocolate ...


1

Yes Protein is essential after a hard workout. There are many studies that show muscle recovery is enhanced by consuming protein after a workout. Of course water is the first thing you need, then carbs, but protein is right up there. This is from Dietitian Jackie Dikos (http://nutritionsuccess.org/about/) : Divide your weight by two, and eat that many grams ...


1

No. Protein shakes will not make you gain weight alone. In order to gain weight, you have to consume more calories, protein by itself does nothing for weight gain. If you want to gain weight from muscle, you have to lift weights while eating enough calories and protein. It's as simple as that.


1

Some people practicing endurance sports could take it, especially if they don't have much time to eat after their workout. It's rather a means to recover than bulking up/building muscle though. For most people it is not necessary though, of course. If you are running to lose weight for example it's probably not recommended because people tend to overestimate ...


1

Bodybuilding amateurs and professionals are definitely the most common users of protein supplements. However, anyone with a protein deficiency (e.g. vegetarians, who usually have a harder time hitting their daily protein requirements) could take advantage of them.


1

It's not that important to eat after workouts, the most important factor is your total protein intake during the day. What kind of workout do you do? If it's just weight lifting you definitely do not need carbs after workouts. An average body can store 2000 kcal of glycogen (carbs), if you are a marathon runner or professional athlete, you'll have a hard ...


1

This is gonna be a "yes-and-no" answer. In general First off, if you've done little to no weight training before, you're in a spot where you can build muscle and lose fat at the same time. This isn't necessarily impossible later, but it gets progressively harder the more you train. In this sense, doing both weight training and a decent bit of cardio, is ...


1

Dr Peter Attia is an accomplished athlete who has remarkable athletic endurance accomplishments performed during nutritional ketosis (due to very low carbohydrate intake). His blog is well-researched and well written. I think you'll find his answer to your question is that carbs are not necessary for the type of activity you plan. My personal experience is ...


1

I use fit frappe protein powder. It is specifically made to add to hot water (I add one scoop to my morning coffee, delish). Their FAQ states: Does heating up Fit Frappé affect the protein? Proteins are chains of large molecules made up of amino acids in different sequences. Denaturation of protein through such methods like heat, acid, or physical ...


1

Bit gross I know but I just add fats to my morning coffee mix It goes a little something like this. Strong coffee, brews for 10/15 mins (thus cools a bit in the cafetière) In to a blender I add 15 g organic grass-fed butter 1 tbs MCT oil 1tbs coconut oil Organic whey protein 93% 10/20 g 10g collagen protein Dash of cinnomen Blitz hard for a minute and you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible