Hot answers tagged

6

Most people treat pullups like some kind of special exercise where reps, sets, and weights are somehow on a different plane of existence and doesn't obey all the rules of fitness. It's no different than any other exercise. You will increase your strength no matter what your rep range is, but you will increase your strength more if you do weighted ones in ...


5

When you are at the bottom of a pullup, and your arms are straight, your biceps start the lift. Your back comes into play when it's time to pull your elbows back, which gradually becomes more relevant as you get higher up. Yeah, it sounds like your biceps are doing most of the work during your pullups. You gain a lot of momentum so that your back doesn't ...


4

It will, up to a point. If you can only do 5-10 straight reps before having to break then it's still heavy enough to build decent muscle for you. Once you can do around fifteen or more in a row, however, it'll start to become decreasingly effective.


4

I just completed my 3×10 sets last week. It took me no more than 3 weeks to achieve it, from not being able to do even 4 repetitions. How I did it: Before you start your workout session (every workout session, no matter if it's chest, shoulders or back day), have a good warm up and stretch your arms. Try to do as many pull ups as you can, rest for 45 ...


4

You're not really greasing the groove right now, and greasing the groove may not be the path to your goal. Six sets of 3-4 pull-ups between squat sets is not greasing the groove--three days a week, you're not greasing the groove! 35 to 40 reps per day is not high volume Maxing out once a week is just not very much practice You're splitting your attention ...


3

Years ago, I had a similar experience that actually led to trigger finger. I have only anecdotal evidence, but, I am convinced that doing chin ups was, in some way, related to the cause of my problem. Once my problem was resolved, I still wanted to perform chin ups, so, I invested in a good pair of padded weight lifting gloves, and, more importantly, a set ...


3

on the question about the seemingly contradictory practices of recovery but also frequent GtG, this article has some good info: http://breakingmuscle.com/strength-conditioning/greasing-the-groove-how-to-make-it-work-for-you It may seem counterintuitive as we often hear how we need to avoid overtraining. However, if we are not training to failure our ...


3

My personal philosophy for using straps is to use them when I don't want my grip strength to limit the effect an exercise will have on a muscle group I'm trying to work. If I'm doing Romanian deadlifts, barbell shrugs, barbell rows after deadlifts (conversely, I don't use them on Pendlay rows since I reset the bar between reps), or Kroc rows, I'm more likely ...


3

Both exercises will work your back significantly. It is really up to preference, I know a lot of guys who solely do pull ups to build a huge back as well as ones who solely do lat pulldowns. Both have recorded similar progress and gains. However, pull-ups activate your core muscles significantly as well, a missing plus of lat pulldowns. However for bicep and ...


2

Overhand grip will focus on your forarms more than a underhand grip. Most people will be better at a overhand grip. Ref: http://www.umich.edu/~mvs330/f00/domination/main.html Optimal position for your hands on the bar depends entirely on how your body is built. Someone with strong arms can do a vertical hang (narrow grip) easily and someone with strong back ...


2

The primary reason for Crossfitters to use kipping or butterfly pullups in workouts is because they are faster and require less energy, enabling you to complete more rounds and finish faster. Strict PU's are wonderful for building strength. Unless you can do strict PU's, it's best not to attempt kipped ones because you can injure yourself more easily. At ...


2

I'm in the no-strap no-glove camp. I trained for a while in powerlifting, and if you lift raw you can't use straps. So I'm of the mindset that a deadlift is how much you can lift, and that includes how much you can hold onto. To that end, once I get up north of my 5RM I'll use a mixed grip. I think if you need help holding onto the bar at 5RM or lower then ...


2

The body responds to shock. Once you can successfully do 100 pushups, 50 pullups and 40 dips daily the body will no longer consider this a shock and rather a routine. At this point, if you keep at it, you will notice a decrease in muscle mass, but not a decrease in strength. Your body was piling up all those muscles because you told it to. Now its realising ...


2

Doing 10 pullups is a lot different than doing 50 pullups. 10 pullups is a feat of strength, while 50 is more about endurance. It's quite easy to build up to 10 chinups and you can do so in a couple months (the other answers have already answered how). If you want to do more than say 20-30 then you have to focus on losing weight, pushing to max reps every ...


1

The PVC cap may of may not work depending on your weight. This design looks attractive to me if you are able to adopt it to fit your specifications: http://www.instructables.com/id/Doorframe-Chin-up-Bar/


1

No better way to get better at an exercise that doing that exercise. I would only advise using rubber bands as assistance or doing negatives if you can't do a single pull-up. Since you can do several, keep at it and you will get better.


1

Pullups are like any other compound exercise like the squat, deadlift, overhead press, or lunge. I think you should start familiarizing yourself with overload programming. Basically, the question you're asking "how do I get stronger?" has been asked many times before and there are solid answers that are time proven. There are also a lot of people wasting ...


1

In answer to your title question, no. They both involve all of the muscles listed above. A chin-up focuses a bit more on the biceps whilst pull-ups distribute more effort across the back. Changing the width of your grip will focus on different parts of your back. But in the end, your body is doing the same amount of work over all of those muscles you listed. ...


1

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24245055 "subsequently, chinups seem to be a more functional exercise" Anddd there you have it. Personally, I see greater carryover from pull ups (Wide grip) compared to either for back development. But I utilize all of them. Typically, pull ups/chin ups are my first exercise on back days until I can't do anymore, then ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible