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I recently did a planking comp with my guy friends at school and I beat them all ( 6 mins. for a 12yr girl who hates sport, that's pretty good! )and now my ribs, and back muscle are in agony! does any one know of any exercises or something that can heal this soreness?


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In order to perform a large amount of push ups, you would have to possess some strength to do so, but it is made up more of endurance than strength when it comes to high reps of anything. For example, people will say you need high endurance to run great distances, so why wouldn't it be the same for a great number of push ups, too. Don't get me wrong, I'm not ...


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Getting to 100 push ups I don't believe that lighter weights will help you achieve your 100 push up goals; here's a good program that can increase your numbers. There are also certain exercises that might increase your push up endurance; essentially, performing more reps of tricep-based and shoulder-based exercises (dips, pull ups, bench press of a weight ...


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You're not telling us how much you weight, but pushups require you to push a quite large portion of your body weight, my own unscientific measurements with my hands on a scale in pushup position tell me ~60%. Doing 13 kg in bicep/tricep workout doesn't really tell us anything. Different types of exercises vary a lot in how heavy they are due to the ...


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If you can perform 4 sets of 30 reps using a machine, it's time to Increase the weights on the machines. Performing 30 reps of any weight-based exercise isn't recommended as it doesn't really serve any useful purpose. Ditch the machines and use dumbbells and barbells. Using machines solely usually gives you the impression of being stronger than you ...


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To become proficient at a movement requires practicing the movement. Proficiency in one movement will not necessarily transfer to others even if they seem to be using related muscle groups. Your case demonstrates this. To become proficient at pushups requires practicing pushups. To become able to do your first pushup, try starting with incline pushups ...


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If you can do only 5 pushups, and you keep trying that single exercise until you can to 10, you will more than likely increase your muscle mass in the process. If you can do 100 pushups, and you keep trying that single exercise until you can to 105, chances are that your muscle mass will not go up in that process. Instead, you will probably increase your ...


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If you cannot perform one pushup and after some training, you're able to do that, you have increased your strength. That's because you now have the ability to lift a large percentage of your body off the ground. In the Strength training world, being able to perform between 5 - 8 repetitions of the same exercise (without reducing the load/intensity) is a ...


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Waaaaay back when I was in the military, my maximum number of consecutive push ups was 84. I was only able to achieve around 56 push ups by concentrating on push ups alone. I was able to achieve that higher number through a combination of increased cycles of push ups and weight lifting. The increased number of push ups increased my stamina more than ...


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You will build strength to a certain level (ie the level it takes to do the push up at your weight comfortably) After that you are building stamina to continue the repetitions. It would be like benching 60 kg a hundred times. It is then easy to do that weight but it's not preparing you for 120kg really


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"Strength" has a more specific meaning in sports and exercise science than it does in common parlance. Strength is the ability to exert a maximal force against a resistance [1]. A push-up is not a maximal effort for many people, and certainly not for someone doing more than a few in one set. A maximal effort similar to a push-up would be a maximum-weight ...


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You are mixing two assertions. One is that many pushups doesn't require a lot of strength and another is that it doesn't build strength. The first is false but the second is kind of true. The stronger you are, the easier it gets and thus the more you can manage. If you can bench press 100 kg then it'll be very easy to rep out with just a 20 kg bar. However, ...


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We say this because when you keep doing pushups for 50+ repetitions, at a certain point, your muscles are really just adapting to this particular movement, and this particular weight, rather than being stimulated to grow. So someone who is able to do a huge number of pushups, might fail miserably if you asked them to do a few with say 10kg of added ...


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You're right that certain rep ranges primarily cause certain types of adaptation. But that's not the end of the story. A good example of that is the legs of high level cyclists. Most of these folks aren't doing strength training, and certainly very few are training for hypertrophy, but their legs are both strong and tend to be very muscular. In the short ...


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There is generally no consensus about anything. We all have different bodies. We all react differently to different stimuli. That said, 60 reps of anything is a stamina exercise, and not a strength exercise. And your friends who did hundreds, weren't developing strength. They were developing further the ability to do hundreds of reps. The best advice we ...



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