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5

As a 42 year old man myself, I can relate. One thing about getting older is that you have to manage your recovery better, and be more strict on how you address your exercise and nutrition regimen. You need to start by figuring out what the first thing you want to address is: Start with what your desire is--lose fat, get "fit" Decide how to measure your ...


5

Yes, there is a difference. For example, in the this lecture, sleep scientist Jessica Payne from University of Notre Dame talks about the importance of sleep in the context of fitness (not only fitness). Sleep is different from just inactivity, see for example the wikipedia article on the topic. In contrast to rest, during sleep the body grows and ...


5

Nothing inherently wrong in the math, just in the model you are using. As it turns out, Greg Nuckols just published an article on Muscle Math, which sheds some light on why it is simply not feasible in practice to go from 300x3 to 840 lbs in 1 year (52 weeks). Some of the major take-aways are: Recovery activities have a power law distribution (i.e. the ...


4

Deload and rest weeks are two very different ways of giving your body, and your central nervous system (henceforth CNS) some time-out. In your example you'd go pretty much all out on 3 weeks out of 4. So naturally, you'd want to cut yourself some slack during the fourth week, so the CNS doesn't break down and you don't go into overtraining (joints will ...


4

They're not damaged. A really simplified way of thinking about your lungs burning is that you are using parts of your lungs that are not accustomed to being so exposed to an outside environment. You have an abundant amount of what are called aveoli and bronchioles that make up your lungs. When running, you expose those normally mucus-lined areas to air, ...


4

Your Lower back Pain seems to emerge from you studying too much, which means that you don't have a correct posture or proper seat with support. Although you can alleviate the pain, i recommend checking in your posture to prevent future problems such as chronic back pains. Exercise increases blood flow and boosts muscle activity , hence alleviating pain. You ...


4

Usually this would be called an active rest day, and is something that I find very effective. I lift 6 days a week then do cardio whether it be riding my bike, jogging, running, or soccer drills. I find it quite helpful. It gives your muscles time to recover but you are still getting your daily dose of exercise. As you said, it is important to avoid using ...


3

NO! A sprain is when the connective tissue is damaged, or over-stretched, but not broken. It takes time for a sprain to properly heal, and until it does your joint stability is compromised. Stretching, light or otherwise, will only make matters worse and prolong the healing time. The best thing to do for a sprain is to let it heal. Ice it, compress it, ...


3

Days off from lifting, known as "rest days", are designed to let your body heal from the damage you do during training. Oddly enough, the more progress you make in strength training the less frequently you can train at maximum because you get very good at damaging your body. Putting it another way, the cumulative exercise (a.k.a. damage) a trained athlete ...


3

Lasse, The difference between deloading or resting is this: the former allows your body to rest (with lighter loads, thus increasing endurance and strength) while the latter allows your body to rest completely (something you don't want to do often) . Given that strength training is hard, taking rests (especially for a beginner) doesn't increase your ...


3

So, the question is, Is there such a thing as over-training? Short answer: yes. You can push yourself further and further into fatigue that you start getting weaker the more work you put in. Over training will have signs of depression, negative affects on health markers like blood pressure, total body inflammation, increase in body fat, and more. In ...


3

Yes, you can overtrain. The main theory of the training is a overcompensation/supercompensation theory: http://healthcorrelator.blogspot.com/2010/08/theory-of-supercompensation-strength.html Overtraining is a training when you body can't compensate and overcompensate damage made by workout. There is an example of the thee different workouts, where the ...


3

My checklist, roughly in order, of what to look for when I have a bad workout: Food. Am I hungry? Was I hungry yesterday? Did I eat enough protein after my last lifting session? Did I eat enough carbs today? Have I been eating enough fats the past few days? Other exercise. Was my warm-up really long today, or did I muck with the order I do my lifts? Did I ...


3

Your math is fine. The problem is you're just plotting your current progress. From Aimee Avaya Everett: New people come on the scene, their lifts continuously go up week after week, and they are the fucking bomb! Their confidence is through the roof! Do we have the next World Champ? [They think,] 'At the rate I am PRing in my snatch and clean & jerk, ...


3

For the sake of vocabulary, I think you're talking about "training recovery". There is short term recovery, like the time you need between sets, but you mentioned supercompensation so you're talking about something more like: I just did a bunch of compound barbell lifts, how long until my body will be stronger because of the exercise? You can get ...


3

Granted, this is somewhat opinion based, but, I can relate to your situation, although, in a slightly more serious vein. I was a competitive bodybuilder for many years. Initially, I was diagnosed with a herniated disc, but, later diagnosed with a slightly more serious condition that ultimately required surgical intervention by a neurosurgeon. So, for your ...


3

I herniated a disc ten years ago and it changed my life. In the long run for the better. I was 6'4 250 lbs with a bodyfat percentage well north of 20%. I was not healthy. I was playing a lot of baseball and the combination of the excess pressure on my midsection from being overweight and the wear and tear from excess rotation (swinging) was something my ...


2

I started 5x5 in May 2014, and the workouts have lengthened to 1.5--2 hours depending on which workout I'm on (shorter for Deadlift day). For reference, my current lifts: Squat: 240 Bench: 160 OH Press: 95 Deadlift: 285 I switched to 3x5 on squats on 10/1. I will be 62 in December. I've deloaded three times on squats, 4 times on OH press, but not on ...


2

The StrongLifts report, page 48, says the 5x5-to-3x5 switch often occurs around a squat of 200 pounds: My own analysis of hundreds of training logs and surveys of StrongLifts Members shows that most guys usually need to switch from 5x5 to 3x5 once they hit the 200lbs mark on the Squat. Now before you fix on this number – many StrongLifts Members got way ...


2

Unless you only had a couple of weeks worth of muscle mass gain, two weeks is not enough time to lose "all the mass you had" and see bodyfat levels change that dramatically. Most likely all that you lost was some of the fluid in the muscle cells. However, all is not lost. All that you need to do is get on track with a consistent diet plan that supports your ...


2

There are two ways of losing calories without raising recovery needs much that I can think of: Eccentric-less training: One of the best ways to burn calories (or get additional training volume) while minimising recovery needs is eccentric-less training. The eccentric portion of a lift (or any exercise) puts far more strain on your central nervous system and ...


2

If you're talking about Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), there's this question and answer that might help you out. Specifically to answer your question though with DOMS you need to break it into prevention and then management once it shows up. Specifically related to massage though: Does massage really help muscle soreness? This 2005 study says ...


2

I've had this before and although I'm a little cautious to throw the overtraining flag, research suggests there is correlation if not causation: These individuals became acutely overtrained as indicated by significant reductions in running performance from day 1 to day 11. The overtrained state was accompanied by severe fatigue, immune system ...


2

I can only speak from experience as someone else that usually works out a few hours before going to sleep. I often have the same problem, particularly after cardio due to the elevated heartrate, but sometimes after weightlifting too. The best thing you can do for yourself is to establish a night-routine that will help relax your body between a workout and ...


2

I injured my low back and groin while deadlifting as a young man. Had an MRI, inconclusive about the degree of herniation (hence it must be slight), but apparently there was damage to the casing of the disk. Have an intense "full" and "hot" feeling in my lower legs at times. Was very worried at first, because I did not know how to alleviate the symptoms ...


1

Before you do anything, you should ask your doctor if there's anything you should avoid doing or anything you should specifically do. I'm not sure if there's anyone here with the training to speak to this specific circumstance. As a general rule, it's usually not a bad idea to start with walking, stretching, and manipulating extremely light weights. The ...


1

You should try "foam roller", I have used it personally for my shoulder injury (caused by a gym accident, and had to rest it for a whole month before I actually start doing any type of athletic activities) with tremendous results.


1

@Berin has given you a very good answer so I will just add that this question/answer about getting back in shape will give you some additional information. As far as your knee pain, you may find that a pair of Nordic Walking Poles can help to lessen the impact on your knees. They can also increase your calorie burn by about 20% over regular walking. ...


1

Your program looks well designed and well followed, and none of what you've mentioned suggests overtraining in the normal sense. However, working out is literally a form of stress. It's supposed to be a manageable stress. If you're concerned about the physiological stress of working out affecting your condition, or if you're worried about overtraining, I'd ...


1

No. The volume of your workout is not enough for overtraining, and the fact that you took time off confirms your problems are not due to your lifting. See a doctor. Especially due to the fact that you have a preexisting hormonal disorder, your doctor will be the best source of information.



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