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10

I'll answer this question in the context of a popular strength program (Starting Strength) that I happen to be doing. Why only a few exercises? Because as a novice, you don't need complicated training to make general strength gains. A well chosen, small set of full-body barbell movements trains you in almost every way you need to be strong as a human ...


10

It's a deadlift, meaning the weight should be dead on the floor. Touch-and-go or otherwise bouncing around is not a deadlift. Personally, I relax my grip and reset on every rep. My hands don't come off the bar, but I open my fingers, ensuring that the weight is indeed dead on the floor. The extra second this adds to each set is negligible and the benefit ...


8

Based on this position statement from the American College of Sports Medicine, the answer to both questions is yes. According to the ACSM, sets of 15-25 reps (using light loads) are most effective for increasing muscular endurance, and have also been shown to increase strength in moderately trained people. High rep sets may also supplement a conventional ...


7

Why Do Abs Exercises Have So Many Reps? Short Answer: To feel "The Burn" Many people erroneously feel that most abs exercises are cardio exercises. As a result, they try to perform as many reps in as short a time frame as possible. First, because the abdominal muscles perform many functions,they're capable of being stressed longer than most muscles. As a ...


4

There is generally no consensus about anything. We all have different bodies. We all react differently to different stimuli. That said, 60 reps of anything is a stamina exercise, and not a strength exercise. And your friends who did hundreds, weren't developing strength. They were developing further the ability to do hundreds of reps. The best advice we ...


4

First, let me correct your understanding of hypertrophy: You get bigger by more fatigue inducing reps (see this article for more info) There's nothing inspired or sacred about rep ranges or even set targets. They are just tools (see this article for more info) Second, you need to understand the concept of fatigue. The articles I linked to above are ...


4

John's answer is correct - all in all, it's hypertrophy (TUT) vs strength (rest). I just wanna add that it's a matter of how long the stoppage lasts, and not the reason that made you stop (as long as you're remaining in the starting position). e.g. resetting your grip is equal to stopping for a breath. There is no definition for how long the bar should lay ...


3

The biggest problem I see with this approach is that you spend a lot of time in opposite ends of the volume spectrum. Look at total reps over time: 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 That's eight workouts in a row of fairly high volume, followed by a dropoff to extremely low volume that's sustained for two workouts. Depending on the number of workouts ...


3

How you organize your sets determines what you get out of them. Each exercise on its own: 5x5 curl, 5x5 press, 5x5 squat. Wait between sets. This is the most strength-oriented of the options. It will involve some hypertrophy and some token conditioning. Note, however, that squatting the same weight that you press and curl will not challenge your legs ...


3

I found this article in Men's Health very interesting and have shaped my workouts on it over the last month or so. The page I linked to breaks down the reps/sets combinations for your different goals. I'm a flabby weakling, and am working on building strength just to get started. I'm doing 6 sets of 4 reps of a very few basic exercises at about 80%-90% max ...


3

I'll start with the overall theory. Greg Nuckols wrote an excellent article on increasing work capacity, which is at the core of getting stronger. It provides a great framework to understand everything else. Option 1: Same weight, but increase reps. This is essentially how the Doug Hepburn training routines are designed. Another example of programs in ...


3

Yes, depending on your goals Resetting your grip likely takes a bit of time, perhaps a few seconds, perhaps 10 or more. During this time, your hamstrings are (mostly) resting. This changes the results of the exercise somewhat. From a hypertrophy standpoint, the more you are 'resting' between reps, the more you're losing a bit of Time-Under-Tension, which ...


2

Number of Reps for a Novice As noted in my answer to your original question, I think sets of 5 or so are fine for a novice such as yourself. That is close enough to the strength end of the rep range spectrum, but is high enough to trigger some muscle growth (hypertrophy) in addition to the neurological improvements. Later, you can decide whether to switch ...


2

After a quick research session, I can't find any research that shows that heavy lifting contributes to spinal disc degeneration. So, lift according to your goals, eg. more repetitions for hypertrophy or endurance, less reps for strength. Previously, heavy physical loading was the main suspected risk factor for disc degeneration. However, results of ...


2

There are some major limitations regarding 1RM formulas: They are designed with a certain demographic in mind. If you are outside that demographic, they may not be applicable. For example, the one you listed is designed for men in their 20s. They are designed to work within a certain rep range. For example, the one you listed becomes grossly inaccurate ...


2

Who ever said that one-rep max calculations were reversible? They're a very rough guide for estimating or predicting an appropriate one-rep max attempt. They're simply not designed to be inverted so that one can figure out the correct rep target for 2kg weights. You would probably get better results basing your workout program on an existing, proven ...


2

There are more explanations than this one, but one is what type of muscle fibre you strengthen. Muscle fibre type 1 are slow, weak but have high stamina, type 2 have low stamina but are stronger and faster. This is why some people are born to be sprinters while some are born to run long distances. If you do many reps, your type 2 fibres will tire and the ...


2

Aside from having a lower potential for overall muscle growth, the abdominals are much like any other muscle group. In other words, it is up to the user on how many reps they use; though some exercises tend to work better with fewer reps (weighted exercise for example) while some tend to align with higher reps or time (purely body weight exercises). The ...


2

Anything that allows you to put in more overall fatigue inducing volume will be good. If you can do the first set at 12 reps, you have a few options: Do 3 sets at whatever you can get, and focus on building up even one more rep each time you do the exercise until you have the full set/reps Reduce weight for each set and use the last set to get as many as ...


1

Ab exercises themselves are very complex. They have been advertised to build shredded abs, which they do, but the problem is they DON'T BUILD STRONG ABS. Any exercise that has you doing high repetitions is endurance training, with not as much muscle growth. The reason that they build shredded abs is because most people get on a plan that has them doing ...


1

Your parents are wise to supervise what you are doing to help you prevent injuring your body. An injury can be for life, so it is best to prevent them, by learning proper form and having expert instruction. Your parents are aware of your maturity level and how much they can trust you to follow your coach's instruction and how serious you are about safety and ...


1

It's quite common to have too short rest periods between sets, so increasing it will lower the effect you are noticing. The effect won't vanish however, I would suggest that you set your goal like 10 reps, 8 reps, 6 reps (3 sets), that way, you will challenge yourself in every set instead of just the last ones. In exercises where you are able to decrease ...


1

Do I need to change the routine? No. So long you are able to progress in weights / reps / sets, you do not need to change your routine. With that said, this is called progressive overload. So long you are progressing, your workout is pretty much effective for you. You are doing pretty well except for your 3rd week. So what you could do is continue doing 70 ...


1

Numbers are approximate, but here's what I do. If you can only do one to three pull-ups, then you should use negatives or assisted pull-ups and strive for an equal number of reps across your sets. At this stage you're not strong enough to warrant straining to do some variable but small number of real pull-ups. You're better served by getting in a ...


1

Just to rule out worst-case scenarios, do you have any issues with eye movement as the day goes on? There's a nasty auto-immune disease called Myasthenia Gravis where the primary symptoms are loss of muscular control with use. Almost always, it's characterized by often-used muscles such as the eyes and the jaw, but there are rare cases just involving major ...


1

What aerobic exercise do you do? What exercises get you heart rate within target range for 20+ min. My guess would be a lack of general fitness. If your heart and lungs aren't strong enough to get oxygenated blood to your muscles, then you wont be able to build strength as effectively. No, I virtually never see "medical practitioners." I certainly ...


1

Counting is generally best for keeping rhythm when lifting. You can say the numbers out loud, murmur them, shout or grunt them, or just count in your head.


1

You are right, for increasing muscle mass, training at intensity that allows you to perform 8-12 reps per set is reasonable. But note that it's not the number of repetitions per set that make the muscles grow, but the intensity of each repetition. If you are able to do more than 8-12 reps per set with a certain weight, the intensity of that weight has ...


1

Both approaches have worked for me. Doing more reps with the same weight is challenging for strength at first, and later for endurance. It works strength, endurance, and size. It can be hard to keep adding reps. Personally I prefer going heavier and doing sets of 3 and progressing to sets of 5 (and sometimes adding additional sets in order to get enough ...


1

With regard to spinal disk safety during exercise, the critical factor is amount of impact rather than actual load (within reason). So doing static lifts will usually be less stressful than playing basketball or running for example. Having said that, maintaining good form during lifts is also critical especially when your back is involved. In my ...



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