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The number of sets you do increases what we call the total volume of work being done. The more volume of work you do, the stronger signal your body gets that it needs to grow. If you do only one set, you aren't giving your body a very strong signal to grow. If the set is heavier than last time (even if you push it to failure), you give a slightly stronger ...


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3 times a week. M/W/F 7 sets of 15 max. After 6 weeks or when able to complete, change to wide, then after that, change to narrow. After that start using step or stair 1. Up to 3 steps. When you use 50 percent of you bw you do 15 reps. When you use 100 percent, such as pullups or dips, you do 7 reps. 15 sets of 7, but only 1 or 2 times per week. Kinda ...


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There are 2 basic ways to progress training. More reps or more weight. Both work to some extent. You could try doing say 30 reps with 20lbs or 5 reps with 60lbs and get some strength gains as a beginner. But in general keeping the reps in the 4-10 range gives better strength results than doing more reps. For fun try lifting a 40lb weight for reps. You can ...


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Minor story detour before my answer. I am 5ft5, 80kg, and I work out regularly and have respectable lifting ability compared to the average joe. My friend is 80kg, 6ft and cannot lift their bodyweight in any lift. We did some archery last week which I we enjoyed. After half a hour I look over and my friend is struggling a lot to keep his shoulders level, ...


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Indeed, the answer is no. To be strong, you need to lift heavy weights, there is no way around that. You will never get strong if you limit yourself to light weights with high reps : that will just build up your endurance. For instance, marathon runners have a lot of endurance, but cannot compete with 100m athletes (which have a lot more power). In order ...



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