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6

My question is, what was likely the result of the second workout that day? Was it more likely to be beneficial, or harmful? You could have injured yourself, for starters. Following that first workout at 11am, you broke a lot of tissues down in your body and weakened yourself. With rest and recovery your body heals, plus a bit of size and strength to ...


6

You're sore Wednesday because you squatted Monday. Soreness from lifting can easily last two or three days, and even get worse on later days. It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. Since waking up this morning, my lower back is very sore. It is as if I did a heavy workout. I don't understand why this happened. This wasn't as sore yesterday. ...


5

I want to preface all of this by saying that this is from memory so a lot of this is sort of foggy. First, yes, a lot of the Bulgarian lifters were apparently on performance enhancing drugs and I believe many of them were banned from any sort of Olympic Weightlifting. Secondly, the Bulgarian method is effective because it takes advantage of the body's ...


5

First, lower back exercises shouldn't be done ONLY on rest days. Of course, since you're already hitting your lower back with squats and deadlifts, it kinda makes the comment redundant; I just needed to point that out in case you switch programs. Second, core training can be done daily. Your core muscles are strong enough to recover quickly from applied ...


3

Good question! In short, No, soreness is not a good indicator of rest/recovery. And you're right the answer is different for strength training vs aerobic and, if I may add injury. In many cases, with notable exceptions, for aerobic workouts you can usually go by soreness. Allow me to address each aspect of soreness as soreness can be defined in a number of ...


3

For weight lifting, the rule of thumb is waiting 48-72 hours before training a muscle group again. This will differ slightly between how long you've been training for, how long your workouts are / how heavily you work that group, ect. If you've been working out for at least 3-4 weeks at the same style (i.e. 'Chest day' of bench, dumbbells and flies) 48 hours ...


3

You’ve likely heard of human growth hormone (HGH), a hormone that fuels muscle growth and recovery. Well, this hormone is released during sleep, particularly during deep sleep. This is a good brief info about sleep and muscle growth link with the references at the bottom. Usually, you fall into REM sleep 90 minutes after you fall asleep. Since leucine and ...


3

It is little bit complicated but let me explain it from heart rate, blood pressure and energy expenditure point of view. During sitting body consume less energy and HR and blood pressure will be lower. For your situation, the athletes will rest approximately 3-5 minutes (4th) which is good time period to save some energy and lower heart rate and blood ...


3

Muscle soreness is irrelevant to muscle growth. It's just a sign you haven't exercised these particular muscles recently. Provided you've had enough rest and good calorie intake in the last few days, you are more than good to go and do the exercises. It's not a good idea to do it if you've done any intense leg exercise in the last ~72 hours. Spend 5 min ...


3

on the question about the seemingly contradictory practices of recovery but also frequent GtG, this article has some good info: http://breakingmuscle.com/strength-conditioning/greasing-the-groove-how-to-make-it-work-for-you It may seem counterintuitive as we often hear how we need to avoid overtraining. However, if we are not training to failure our ...


2

Your body only builds muscle when you are resting. Hence, the importance of good sleep and at least 1 rest day a week. Without rest, you simply won't improve as much as you could be able to because of fatigue. There are so many factors at play here with sleep, ability, prior training, training cycle, diet, etc. to be able to say to what level the impact ...


2

Yes, creatine can be taken on rest days as well. Here is an excellent article with research backed data on creatine: http://examine.com/supplements/Creatine/ Creatine monohydrate can be supplemented through a loading protocol. To start loading, take 0.3 gram per kilogram of bodyweight per day for 5–7 days, then follow with at least 0.03 g/kg/day ...


1

A recovery run does not replace a rest day. Recovery runs are most effective when you already have a solid base of strong bones, tendons, and joints built by months of steady training + rest cycles. If you don't have such a base, an extra run in your week may do more harm than good. When in doubt, rest. To find out whether you're at risk of overdoing it, ...


1

I personally only run back to back days when training for an event. If not, i average 3.5 days a week with plenty of rest in between. Unless you are working toward a race or trying to lose weight, running alternate days is more than enough. Very often, especially while running, one can end up with very small microfractures in their legs, especially if they ...


1

What you're actually asking about is "recovery". The term "rest time" usually applies to the time between sets within a workout. For example, if you'd do several sets of squats, you might rest anywhere between 2 to 5 minutes or even more depending on the intensity between those sets. Mark Rippetoe likes to underline in his works (Starting Strength, ...


1

Firstly your body can adapt to a lot of crazy things within limits. Now lifting every day applies differently to different lifts. Doing the olympic lifts everyday is a different beast to doing squats/bench/deads every day. In addition squatting everyday (getting popular nowadays) is again a different animal to deadlifting every day (which you may have ...


1

I use creatine as a supplement for boxing, to increase endurance when I'm training up to a fight(I cut it 3 weeks before a fight to throw off the water weight that it adds. For me, it's around 2kg.) I've experimented a bit and ended up taking the same amount every day, be it rest day or not. As far as I've read, it's stored and will just build up over time. ...



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