Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

I cannot provide a link to an official analysis of the training/instruction program of an elite military facility. What I can do is tell you of my own personal experience with it. You mentioned the lack of regeneration and rest, and you are absolutely right. The idea behind the selection process is to completely maim you psychologically and put you to the ...


8

It really depends on what you are after. If you are running the Starting Strength program or some other beginner program, they take the stance of take as much rest as you need--even 10 minutes between sets! The goal for those programs is to increase the weight on the bar as quickly as you can. Trade offs for Rest Times Longer rests provide more recovery ...


7

The difference between sleeping immediately after a workout and sleeping a half-workday later is negligible. The more significant difference, which is still pretty minor, is the increased energy many people feel earlier in the day. Generally speaking, most people are slightly stronger in early-day efforts than they are in late workouts. (Their mobility is ...


6

Physiotherapists usually make you do several light sets every day in order to strengthen your healing injuries. Yes. If reducing the volume to one only set per exercise obviously reduces the chances of over-training and injury It doesn't obviously reduce the chances of over-training and injury. why not training a single set per exercise, every ...


6

Are there disadvantages to longer rests between sets? Sure. I cool down if I wait longer than five or so minutes between heavy squat sets, and that can be a problem if my mobility is iffy and I really need to be warm to get good form. It's also annoying to have the two-hour-plus workouts that result from 10-minute rests between sets of, say, heavy ...


3

First off, you shouldn't eat less protein on rest days. The muscles get damaged during workout, but they get repaired during rest, so you need the protein for that, as well as for building new muscle. That said 1g per pound of lean body mass would be good if you want to keep all your muscle. With 75kg and a presumed 15% bodyfat you'd have ~64kg (141lbs) of ...


3

I agree with Dave, the best time is when you make it. The important moment here is to understand that you should strive to start each workout session at the same time. Thus the body will develop a habit of working out at certain hours. This way it will be "prepared" for a workout and your workouts will go smoother. I used to workout in the morning, in the ...


3

Yes, there are disadvantages in that you won't be stressing your muscles enough to get all the growth that is possible out of each session. Muscle growth is a combination of two different types of hypertrophy, sarcoplasmic and myofibril. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy produces more size, but less strength (This is what is stimulated by the 8-12 rep range), while ...


3

Although I cannot fully answer this question with specific scientific evidence, I can provide input that supports the assumptions of the original question. The original author assumes there is a scientific basis for the physical fitness programs used by the elite fighting units of the United States' military. At least one response called this assumption ...


2

Let me start off by saying that Sleep is more important then Working out, and here is the why, the main thing we try to accomplish while sleeping is "Recovery" and the most important thing you need after Working out is "Recovery" and obviously you can see that if the main thing you need is Recovery but you are not getting Recovery time the workouts wont do ...


2

For someone starting out 5-7 mins is just way too long to be sitting around in between sets. You need to be doing something not reading! If you are lifting for pure strength - not size or tone or athletic reasons - than longer break times can work. But not at 5-7 mins per. That means you spent 21 mins doing 15 squats? That doesn't seem efficient. There ...


2

Five to six hours of sleep a night is not optimal for most people. While your attempts are admirable as you rightly recognise other more vital activities have to take priority over working out. Priorise getting at least 7 hours of sleep a night: This is necessary for good health. Getting your diet in order first: Most people will acknowledge that the best ...


2

This is very dependent on the program. Reasoning behind rest scheduling If you're strength training, the recovery time is largely based on how much time it takes to move into supercompensation. It's easiest to manage your program if you do full body workouts, so the amount of rest needed is uniform across your body, and you can schedule full rest days. If ...


2

The StrongLifts report, page 48, says the 5x5-to-3x5 switch often occurs around a squat of 200 pounds: My own analysis of hundreds of training logs and surveys of StrongLifts Members shows that most guys usually need to switch from 5x5 to 3x5 once they hit the 200lbs mark on the Squat. Now before you fix on this number – many StrongLifts Members got way ...


2

A common way to shorten one-rep-max is to use the label 1RM. The same goes for any number before the rep max. That means: 1RM = 1 rep max 5RM = 5 rep max 7RM = 7 rep max If you know your 1RM, but not your 5 or 7 RM you can figure it out a good number to use pretty easily. The most common formula used for calculating 1RM I've seen is acceptable for use ...


1

I've always considered it good practice to do calisthenics every day, if being good at calisthenics is your goal. Generally speaking calisthenics are useful for improving cardiovascular endurance, and the best practice for that is doing them often. Maybe you break up which exercises you do which day, ie chinups and prone bridge one day, pushups leg raises ...


1

XRM is your X rep max, or the maximum weight that you can lift X many times. I've found that above 1 or 2 the terminology gets fuzzier: a 1RM allows for some form degradation because the test is simply "can you lift it?", whereas a 5RM is often colloquially used to mean "can you do 5 reps with proper form?" This program is telling you to pick a weight for ...


1

One set per exercise is nowhere near the volume you're talking about in those scenarios. If you're a coal miner and you're lifting moderately heavy things all day, you're going to build strength in those muscles. Doing a single set of everything is going to result in very little strength gains. Not to mention that, barring any kind of warm ups which don't ...


1

The amount of rest that your muscles (in general or one specifically) need to rest after a workout depends on your eating and sleeping habits during the recovery period, level of training ability, as well as the intensity of the workout. That is to say, there is no answer to your query, or more precisely, there are many answers and all of them are correct in ...


1

If you're on a novice linear progression like StrongLifts or Starting Strength, then 5 to 10 minute rests between sets are a reality at the tail end of the progression. If you're getting to real weights, don't fret. If it's happening quite early in your progression--say, with less than bodyweight on your squat, or less than 100 pounds on your press--then you ...


1

An exercise regimen that targets muscle-building (i.e., anaerobic activity, intense muscle breakdown and rebuild, and a heavy diet) is fundamentally different than one that targets weight-loss (i.e., aerobic activity, lighter muscle breakdown and rebuild, and a lighter diet). I can see why taking a week off from muscle-building will help the ...


1

There are a few articles (below) that correlate decreased sleep to higher appetite, weight gain and risk of diabetes. The latter two might have more to do with the correlated increased desire for high-carb foods, rather than the actual loss of sleep. http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/515387 ...


1

I am sure that you are aware that your testosterone levels can go down due to sleep deprivation. Also most bodies naturally try to store fat. So gaining weight should be easy, but it might not be lean weight. I would suggest the following: Get your lifting done in 30-35 mins or less each day. Your body is already tired. No use making it ...


1

It does make comparing your lifting sessions useless. If you time your rest periods then you can be assured that one week you were doing better than another and see whether or not you were making progress. aka doing 1000 chinups over a full a day can't be compared to doing 4 sets of 10.


1

There are different levels of recovery. The one most people think about is the rest between sessions. When your training is arranged well, you will be recovered enough to do the prescribed work the next session. The one not everyone thinks about is the time between sets. The principle is the same, you want to be recovered enough to do the prescribed sets ...


1

A recent article on Juggernaut Training Systems discussing fatigue sheds some light on the subject. Training-induced fatigue has 3 primary proximate causes: substrate depletion, neuroendocrine alterations, and microtrauma. Substrate depletion has to do with your energy systems, including: ATP, Creatine Phosphate, and glycogen. ATP is replenished after ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible