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7

The difference between sleeping immediately after a workout and sleeping a half-workday later is negligible. The more significant difference, which is still pretty minor, is the increased energy many people feel earlier in the day. Generally speaking, most people are slightly stronger in early-day efforts than they are in late workouts. (Their mobility is ...


6

5RM = 5 rep max. So, the heaviest weight that you can do 5 times, without re-racking the weight. If you could have done it 6 times, then it wasn't your 5RM. There are several calculators online that can estimate given your 1RM.


3

First off, you shouldn't eat less protein on rest days. The muscles get damaged during workout, but they get repaired during rest, so you need the protein for that, as well as for building new muscle. That said 1g per pound of lean body mass would be good if you want to keep all your muscle. With 75kg and a presumed 15% bodyfat you'd have ~64kg (141lbs) of ...


3

I agree with Dave, the best time is when you make it. The important moment here is to understand that you should strive to start each workout session at the same time. Thus the body will develop a habit of working out at certain hours. This way it will be "prepared" for a workout and your workouts will go smoother. I used to workout in the morning, in the ...


2

This is very dependent on the program. Reasoning behind rest scheduling If you're strength training, the recovery time is largely based on how much time it takes to move into supercompensation. It's easiest to manage your program if you do full body workouts, so the amount of rest needed is uniform across your body, and you can schedule full rest days. If ...


2

The StrongLifts report, page 48, says the 5x5-to-3x5 switch often occurs around a squat of 200 pounds: My own analysis of hundreds of training logs and surveys of StrongLifts Members shows that most guys usually need to switch from 5x5 to 3x5 once they hit the 200lbs mark on the Squat. Now before you fix on this number – many StrongLifts Members got way ...


2

A common way to shorten one-rep-max is to use the label 1RM. The same goes for any number before the rep max. That means: 1RM = 1 rep max 5RM = 5 rep max 7RM = 7 rep max If you know your 1RM, but not your 5 or 7 RM you can figure it out a good number to use pretty easily. The most common formula used for calculating 1RM I've seen is acceptable for use ...


1

In one word, yes. If you receive StrongLift's periodic emails, Mehdi, the program's creator usually advises that cardio or leg exercises should be reduced on resting days because that'll prevent the legs from obtaining their required rests, especially as the weights increase. So, if you're cycling 40 mins daily, your legs will have a harder time recovering ...


1

I've always considered it good practice to do calisthenics every day, if being good at calisthenics is your goal. Generally speaking calisthenics are useful for improving cardiovascular endurance, and the best practice for that is doing them often. Maybe you break up which exercises you do which day, ie chinups and prone bridge one day, pushups leg raises ...


1

XRM is your X rep max, or the maximum weight that you can lift X many times. I've found that above 1 or 2 the terminology gets fuzzier: a 1RM allows for some form degradation because the test is simply "can you lift it?", whereas a 5RM is often colloquially used to mean "can you do 5 reps with proper form?" This program is telling you to pick a weight for ...


1

A recent article on Juggernaut Training Systems discussing fatigue sheds some light on the subject. Training-induced fatigue has 3 primary proximate causes: substrate depletion, neuroendocrine alterations, and microtrauma. Substrate depletion has to do with your energy systems, including: ATP, Creatine Phosphate, and glycogen. ATP is replenished after ...



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