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6

You're sore Wednesday because you squatted Monday. Soreness from lifting can easily last two or three days, and even get worse on later days. It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. Since waking up this morning, my lower back is very sore. It is as if I did a heavy workout. I don't understand why this happened. This wasn't as sore yesterday. ...


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First, lower back exercises shouldn't be done ONLY on rest days. Of course, since you're already hitting your lower back with squats and deadlifts, it kinda makes the comment redundant; I just needed to point that out in case you switch programs. Second, core training can be done daily. Your core muscles are strong enough to recover quickly from applied ...


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on the question about the seemingly contradictory practices of recovery but also frequent GtG, this article has some good info: http://breakingmuscle.com/strength-conditioning/greasing-the-groove-how-to-make-it-work-for-you It may seem counterintuitive as we often hear how we need to avoid overtraining. However, if we are not training to failure our ...


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Muscle soreness is irrelevant to muscle growth. It's just a sign you haven't exercised these particular muscles recently. Provided you've had enough rest and good calorie intake in the last few days, you are more than good to go and do the exercises. It's not a good idea to do it if you've done any intense leg exercise in the last ~72 hours. Spend 5 min ...


3

If you want to let your "pushup muscles" rest, that's good. I would suggest throwing in pullups and squats, either on the same day as you do pushups, or on the days in between. This way, you're not only training chest/triceps, but also working upper back, biceps, and legs. There are a million different bodyweight exercises you can do with minimal ...


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70 days of inactivity will have a muscle atrophy effect. There are measures to limit the extent to which muscle wanes, but still, without use, they will deteriorate. I don't know what NASA is planning to do to counter these effects, but researchers have found that neuromuscular electrical stimulation can keep muscle protein synthesis active in comatose ...


2

On my rest days, I usually try to do these: Long walks. Walking back and forth to work for me is ~5 miles, and it's a terrific way to keep the body moving and learn how to walk long distances, which is about as core to the human condition as you can get. Hiking. Find a decent trail, but your running shoes on, and go hiking for a few hours. Yoga. Yoga is ...


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My personal favorite is foam rolling. I mean, why wouldn't you want to give your muscles a good massage? It's kind of a reward. It can also reduce muscle soreness as well as improve your range of motion, according to this study. I actually didn't know that last part until just now. I've been foam rolling for quite some time simply because of how good it ...


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I find the ACSM Position Stand is a very credible source of precisely what you want to know. Evidence category A is backed by significant Random Control Trials (RCT) with significant participants Evidence category B is based on limited RCT studies, or a subgroup analysis, or is a meta-analysis. Evidence category C is Non-randomized trials or ...


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In addition to Alecs good answer and the comments I wanted to add, that there a a lot of different dodyweight trainings availible today. Starting with different polpular Books like Mark Lauren - You are your own gym https://www.marklauren.com/ or perhaps in your case better: Paul wade - Convict conditioning http://www.dragondoor.com/b41/ which are ...


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You need rest so your body can have time to recover. If you're not stressing it a lot, it won't need to recover as much. A crude but effective guide can be whether or not you're stronger (or "fresher") on Wednesday than you are on Monday (since Tuesday is your current rest day). If you're knocking out the same level of intensity and time on Wednesday as ...


1

To answer your question, its highly debatable. Some factors you may want to consider:- How heavy did you train, in this case did you go heavy for your bench or did you go light? How much volume(sets/reps) is done on that day(for your bench)? Are you eating in a surplus(eating more than your maintenance). How fast can your body recover(physical and central ...


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Do I need to change the routine? No. So long you are able to progress in weights / reps / sets, you do not need to change your routine. With that said, this is called progressive overload. So long you are progressing, your workout is pretty much effective for you. You are doing pretty well except for your 3rd week. So what you could do is continue doing 70 ...


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First, nice icon. :) Second, just listen to your body. No one can say how much is too much (and will lead to overtraining). Just familiarize yourself with the symptoms of overtraining and be aware of it. There's a difference between being lazy and being tired from overtraining. If you find yourself excessively tired and without motivation or you find your ...


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The best "exercise" for your eyes is a 5-mins break: as often as you can. Here is a simple experiment you can do to better understand what it means for your eyes to focus on a screen for a long time. So, while you are looking a movie, raise your hand parallel to the floor and keep it like that during the movie. How many minutes could you resist? Now realize ...


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I share the same profession as you and have the same concerns. My advice would be to avoid computer eye strain by taking frequent breaks from the screen. I’ve been advised to get up from the pc every twenty minutes, or so. Frequent breaks give your eyes a chance to relax and reduces the strain. I’ve found that setting a regular schedule for breaks helps ...



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