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7

Is it terrible and wrong? I'm willing to concede he knows a fair amount more about training than I do with his multiple years under the bar. Bill Starr is also a very reputable source. There are some subtleties that I think are worth calling out: Bill Starr recommend sets of 15-20 for rehab--which is consistent with all the rehab advice I've read. The ...


5

What I've heard--and this is mere hearsay, I'm no medical professional--is that any attempt to use heavier weights (and thus lower rep ranges) with the small muscles of the shoulder is nigh-impossible, because the larger muscles, the prime movers, take over after a certain weight. Keeping the weight very low allows the stronger prime mover muscles to hang ...


4

I'm also not a medical professional. I had minor shoulder problems in my early 20's, and was put on rotator cuff exercises (plus a basic strengthening program). And it worked, and I did rotator cuff exercises fairly consistently (along with regular weight lifting and sports) for about 10 years. What I found when I tried to go any heavier than the lightest ...


4

RTC Strengthening You may want to link to some of the programs you reference that “always work them with the lightest pink dumbbells and in the >15 rep range”. I suspect that the RTC exercises referenced are rehab exercises for RTC injuries. Injured tissue is exercised differently than normal healthy tissue and often specific muscles are worked in ...


3

To answer this question, we need to break the quote into two sections. Pressing actually strengthens the rotator cuff muscles. When you press overhead and finish the lockout correctly, all of the muscles of the shoulder are tight and contracted. As the weight goes up over time, the strength of the finish must increase and the force produced by ...


3

Mark Rippetoe and Starting Strength don't advise sticking to light weights for rotator cuff work. He says that your rotator cuffs will strengthen in the appropriate amount if you just press correctly. Pressing actually strengthens the rotator cuff muscles. When you press overhead and finish the lockout correctly, all of the muscles of the shoulder ...


3

The teres minor muscle is part of the rotator cuff and it externally (laterally) rotates the shoulder. It does so in combination with the infraspinatus, so I'm not certain that you can fully isolate it. To Strengthen the external rotators together, you can do so with: Cables or resitance/thera-bands in a neutral position or in an elevated position Free ...


2

Personally, unless you have a known deficiency or need to strengthen them for a specific reason, I would just let your normal training take care of them. They are ancillary muscles for most movements (Which means accessory or helping muscles), and their primary function is to stabilize/rotate the upper arm, mostly by keeping the head of the humerus in place ...



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