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7

There really isn't a convenient time to workout no matter who you are. It's a lot of work, you get sweaty, you need to change your clothes, and it usually involves going somewhere other than your home or work. I try to do strength training three days a week, usually around ~3pm. The gym is empty, I can actually get in and out much faster than the busier ...


6

Most "guys in the gym" have absolutely no idea what they are doing. There are certain exercises that you can really do pretty much every day for the rest of your life with good results. If you were using a lot of weight, you might want to do them every other day. That's the premise behind most strength training plans: they pick the most valuable barbell ...


6

What you’re describing is Exercise Adaptation, or, “training plateau”. It’s a common response to exercise stress. From the National Academy of Sports… The principle of adaptation refers to the process of the body getting accustomed to a particular exercise or training program through repeated exposure. As the body adapts to the stress of the new ...


3

The main (good) reason why it's recommended to change your routine every so often is psychological, but it's a double edged sword. On the one hand, if you do the same routine every time, you might get bored, you might stop challenging yourself because you know what you can do. On the other hand, since you do know pretty well what kind of weights you can ...


3

My coach in college taught me the "below the throat" idea, where if you have any symptoms below your throat, you should hold off from training. Any muscle aches, back pain, lung tightness, rashes, etc. If it's really and only a head cold I'd bring up these two points: Don't infect other people. The people going to that gym will be close to you, using the ...


2

Generally, if you managed to complete one cycle, you'd just increase the weight by the recommended amount (10kg) and start a new one. There will be a point where you won't be able to complete all reps on a cycle and, as far as I understand Wendler's philosophy, there's no point in rushing there. Wendler also adressed the speed of progress on 5/3/1 in this ...


2

I'm going to start off with that there is no universally best routine. Only what is most appropriate for you given your level of training, physical development, and your goals. Advice in the world of bodybuilding (i.e. hypertrophy work), opinions are so severely divided that it's even hard to compile a list of routines. That's probably due to the fact a ...


2

Why does my working out routine needs to be changed every so often? As you train your program, you should be slowly increasing weight as you feel you can handle it and still meet the targets for your training. This level of progressive adaptation should keep you improving for a while, but there will come a time where adding that next 5 lbs or 2.5 kgs ...


2

You may want an app, but to me it sounds like what you're looking for is a coach. Your requirements read like the list of services Fitocracy's online coaches offer (example -- I am not affiliated with the site or the coaches, I use the free app).


2

Lots of programs are "scientifically based". That doesn't mean that looking for "scientifically based" programs is a good way to find a program that works well for you. Most quality, applicable strength and conditioning research is done with athletes, sports teams, and gyms--not generally in universities or by people who write their results up in a ...


1

You are worth your name. Your regime looks pretty strong, but you could try a few things to make it more effective. Firstly, as you said yourself, try to get more sleep. Rest is critical if you are working out this hard. I had significant results when I started sleeping for almost 9 hours. Secondly, your diet looks pretty good,but you could try a few ...


1

Stronglifts is definitely a good program for beginners. However, because it is based on powerlifts it will take some time before you can use it optimally. If you're thinking long term heavy barbell training, it's definitely the way to go in my opinion, but if your goals are more short term I would also suggest something like insanity or just at home ...


1

Similar to Urban, i also use Jefit. While i did my own routine (based on the book Bigger, leaner, stronger by Michael Matthews), the app also features community workouts made by other people, these workouts can be filtered by ranking meaning you can chose to follow popular workouts with great reviews. The large workout database allows you to vary your ...


1

I've been using this app called Jefit, which is fairly popular, you might have already heard of it. I've created my own routine (based on the equipment available to me) and can record reps and weight for each exercise. They have quite an exhaustive list of exercises for you to choose from broken down by which body part they push. Using this, I can see ...


1

For your case, go easy on the complex carbs and sugars with your lunch. On your commute, have a pre-workout bar/snack about an hour away from the gym. Have a cup of coffee (or similar caffeine intake) about 15min from workout start. After heavy lifting, have a nice post-workout meal.


1

The best routines for natural lifters are 5x5 routines for the most part. Stronglifts, starting strength and bill starr routines all stand out above the rest for achieving maximal results in the shortest time. If you are a natural lifter make sure to stay away from body part splits, these are useless in my opinion. As for gaining size a caloric surplus is ...


1

I would try something like Couch to 5k or hiring a trainer at a gym. You need a lot of guidance. Progressing from not-fit to a serious routine takes a lot of knowledge and a willingness to pay for your mistakes in injury.


1

Walking and Weightlifting Walking is a fine starting point for overall fitness, and to combat the problems associated with sitting at a desk for long periods. If you're completely new, just about ANY sort of resistance training is going to get you results. Once you've been at it for a few dozen sessions, you can start looking into more complete lifting ...


1

My suggestion would be to make small variations to the workout each time. This way you will work slightly different muscle groups each time to increase your overall results AND not get bored with doing the same thing all the time. Suggested variation: -15 squat jumps (body weight squat with a jump at the end) -15 incline or decline push ups - (put feet or ...


1

If you have a chin up bar, you can do bodyweight rows. You can make them harder by elevating your feet on a box or doing front lever rows (tuck, straddle or full). That's for rows. This routine is neglecting the lower back. So, I recommend doing back extensions and reverse leg raises. If your goal is strength or muscle hypertrophy You won't gain much ...


1

The row works your back and shoulders. What sort of equipment do you have available? Pullups and bodyweight inverted rows would be the bodyweight exercises that I'd consider, but you'd still need some equipment to do them.


1

Allowing the lifts to impact each other does not necessarily mean decreased productivity. You mentioned that you have stalled in your lifts; reducing the number of times you perform a certain lift to 1 will make it difficult to get out of this stall. With a caloric surplus like you mentioned, you have the ability to recover enough to perform each lift 2+ ...


1

It seems as though you're looking for the entire package! To do this you're going to have to take things phase by phase and just repeat it over time. Take a look at a program by a guy named Elliot Hulse. It's called "Lean Hybrid Muscle". It mixes strength training, hypertrophy training and athletic training all into one. It works in 2 phases. Phase 1: Power ...


1

Lots of people train with full-body routines. They train legs and shoulders and back and biceps and triceps and all the rest on the same day. It works for many people. It might work for you--or it might not, depending on your specific training level and needs. I am not convinced that recovery has anything to do with whether one hits multiple muscle groups. ...


1

I've just started experimenting with chest/back on the same day, and love the intensity. Although because it is time consuming, I've created my routine with chest/back supersets. I get a crazy good workout in 1 hour's time. I do 3 supersets that looks like this: Incline dumbbell chest press / superset with Wide Grip Weighted chinups. (both 3x6) Cable ...


1

I hate answering with a question, but you really should have a solid answer to what are your goals? In short, you want to stress your system enough to cause adaptation. The four cycles go: Initial fitness (what you walk into the weight room with). Training (weakening your body through targeted stress). Recovery (your body is actively repairing you through ...


1

I see you have written this post some time ago, but am wondering how you are doing with it now? It's really weird seeing ALL your struggles as if "I" wrote it, having had the same struggles. One thing that has really helped me that no one ever mentions is sunlight therapy. This changes the body clock to be what time you choose to wake and sleep even if you ...



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