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37

I have been running for about twenty years and always found the logic behind barefoot running quite compelling. If you want to read more about it after watching that video you can look at Harvard's Skeletal Biology Lab's Barefoot Running Website or just watch the compelling videos showing ground reaction forces for different types of foot strikes. After ...


32

Disclaimer: I've worked for a company that makes pressure plates, that allow you to analyze running patterns (with or without shoes). I've done research at a specialized running shoe shop and my father is an orthopedic shoe manufacturer. So in short, my opinions are fairly biased, but by no means scientifically proven. While md5sum names some great rules of ...


23

I think that inherently there's nothing bad about minimal shoes, but as the saying goes: "if the shoe fits, wear it". The shoes aren't for everyone, so while it may be great for some, they can be harmful to others. A shoe like the Nike Free was designed to be used together with regular running shoes, to mimic barefoot walking on a grass field, as an ...


12

I was not always a minimalist/BF evangelist... I ran NCAA xc and track for Florida State for 5 years, so we were sponsored by Nike, so I had a large bias towards all Nike everything (who doesn't when you're getting free gear in exchange for working your tail off 4-6 hours a day in the weightroom, at morning practice, and at evening practice). With that ...


12

I have an old problem with my knee from mountain biking and I am also terribly bad at running. As a result, running never really worked out for me. My knee would hurt making the whole experience sour. This also applied for treadmills. When I did various martial arts I would run barefoot in the gym during the workouts and I was surprised to see that my knee ...


12

This depends on the quality of the material and even within shoes from the same factory, there can be quite some variation. In this study Heel-shoe interactions and the durability of EVA foam running-shoe midsoles by Verdejo and Mills from 2004 they found that after 500 km the peak plantar pressures had increased by 100% on average. Furthermore, they did ...


10

If you really go heavy, one of the most import things to do in a squat or dead lift is to keep your weight on your heels. Running shoes tend to have a thick sole and thin toe which in effect pitches you forward. Bare feet keep you the most connected to the ground, and gives you the best base to control your position.


9

I'll write about barefoot training and my college career. I'm a few years out of college now and planning on getting back into shape, but my college training makes a nice, compact case study. Note: The barefoot/shod dichotomy is mixed up with hard/soft surfaces one in my training history. I once ran just two miles barefoot on the roads. Shortly after ...


9

Whilst there are surely other downsides, I have to say one of the biggest downsides I have found with my Vibrams is the smell... They stink! Using the washing machine did not solve anything. I would like to know how to fix this issue but that is another question for another time!


9

The Nike Free 5.0 was one of the first running shoes designed to simulate barefoot running. The "5.0" was supposed to indicate that it was half way between running with a traditional shoe (10.0) and running barefoot (0.0). You might find the 3.0 to be good for regular running. There are lots of minimalist running shoes you just need to decide what it is ...


9

Flat, non-compressible soles work best for weight-lifting. Chuck Taylors are better than any running shoe. If that isn't trendy enough for you, something like the Vibram FiveFingers or other "free" running shoe will work. As for what the other people in the gym are doing, that's a terrible gauge for proper behavior. It'd be like learning to drive by ...


8

If they're not causing injuries then they're absolutely fine. If all you're doing is walking a few kms (and the distance is much less than what you're running) then they're perfectly fine. If they start wearing so much that they change your walking style or you start getting symptoms of injuries (such as shin pain) then I would chuck them.


7

what are some potential downsides of running in minimalist shoes? Bloody toes, sharp rocks, and cooked feet from molten blacktop are a few problems with minimalist shoes. Wearing VFF KSOs running on a cinder path that I have run on many times before. I heard a sound and looked up into a tree. Next thing I knew I was cringing in pain as I kicked a man ...


7

I don't know Ivo or Greg but they are so far off base that I would ignore them. Vibram Five fingers are made to run on ANY surface. It has nothing to do with running style, cement, etc. It forces you to change the way you run to a more natural manner. If you are a heel striker...you will soon quit that. The Bikala is just fine for distance running. Some ...


7

http://barefootrunningshoes.org/ has a pretty comprehensive database. My suggestion due to the irregular toe length issue would be the Vivo as it has the widest toe box.


7

Before investing in new shoes, I would ask your foot doctor whether or not your foot condition will be able to tolerate barefoot running. Also, ask about ways to strengthen the arch and foot muscles, in a less demanding way than with barefoot running. The following exercises are examples of how to strengthen the foot and arch: Foot push ups and arch ...


7

You can... But in my experience, it's better to use that 7th eyelet slightly differently to prevent heel slipping. It is shown in this video starting around 1:47: To the video Steps (images from Health on the Run): Create a loop using the last two eyelets. Put the shoelace through the hole on the opposite side. Put on the shoe and pull the laces tight ...


6

If you've been wearing shoes all your life you're in for a real sore time if you leave your shoes at home next time you run a marathon. You need to develop callouses on your feet in order to safely run barefoot. To avoid having to take time away from running, I would suggest working your way up to it. Take your shoes, but don't wear them for the first ...


6

I recently purchased a pair of Merrell True Glove minimalist shoes. Can't say enough about how much I like them. Note, as a runner I've always had a mostly forefoot strike, since I was a sprinter in high school and did all of my training in my track spikes. This continued through my time in the Army, and even though I had a running hiatus of practically 5 ...


6

Think like a dancer Dancers (ballerina, tap, etc) obviously put a lot of strain on their feet and deal with blisters on a regular basis. Therefore, I'd trust that they have some pretty good advice on prevention. The following quotes were taken directly from this site. Make sure your shoes fit The easiest way to get a blister is to wear dance shoes ...


6

Running shoes will help protect your feet by adding more cushion or encouraging better stride (go for these!). However, running long distances is not the best method for improving performance in tennis or soccer. Both of those sports are more focused on short sprints with frequent stops which demand different muscle fibers than developed in long distance ...


6

New Balance Minimus Merrell True Glove


6

Short answer: barefoot is better than running shoes. Long Answer: Running shoes are designed for providing a cushion to your feet. In essence, they absorb the impact of your foot hitting the ground by compressing the sole and springing back. This is not the behavior you want when you have more than a couple hundred pounds on your back. With that much ...


6

I can tell you the Spartan Sprint race absolutely DESTROYED my original Vibram KSO's that were 2 years old. Punctures, tears, just not worth it in my opinion. I would get some cheapo light soled sneakers if it's multi-terrain. If it's just mud and water, they'll probably survive ok.


6

Disclaimer: I specialize in gait analysis, so obviously I'm heavily biased. What are your options for footwear? No shoes, so barefoot running Minimal shoes, like Vibrams Run-of-the-mill running shoe (sub 100$) High end neutral shoe High end correcting shoe If you've decided the first two options aren't for you, you're going to have to pick a shoe. That ...


6

There really is no "conclusive" proof at the current time, and not likely to be any in the near future. Part of the problem is that Chi/Pose and the natural styles of running also have a very lucrative market for shoe companies. Pretty much every shoe company now makes minimalist type shoes, and there are entire companies (Newton) that make only fore/mid ...


5

My response is strictly personal experience. I have never been a runner. I was a swimmer with awful knees and every time I tried to begin a running program I would purchase the best shoes I could at the local running store and start on a walk-run program. Inevitably the knees would prevent me from progressing. One year ago this summer I bought my first ...


5

There are two answers to that question, possibly three. The answer depends on 1) how much you run in a week/month and 2) how hard you run. Conventional wisdom says you should replace your shoes every 400-500 miles. However, if you are only running 10 miles a week, that will mean your shoes will last a year. The foam itself starts to break down and lose ...


5

Fungicide will usually fix this, such as Desenex spray or something similar. Bleach is kind of hard on running shoes -- use it sparingly if at all.


5

Running them through the washer usually results in shoe disintegration. Dry them, bag them and leave them in the freezer for a day. Use fungicidal talcum powder before and after the run.



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