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4

Aside from visiting an orthopedic doctor is there a way for people to learn what kind of foot type they have? Yes, easily! Just look at an old pair of shoes! Below we see two shoes, one old (left) and one new (right). As you can easily see, the left shoe shows excess wear on the outer toe. You've probably seen the kind of graphic below that relates ...


3

I am a veteran runner (and I have also suffered ITBS when I began to run). Even worse, I have what's called "Morton's Toe" so that I am not even supposed to be running according to orthopaedics and podiatrists I am very sceptic in regard to stability additions to shoes for beginners and gait analysis. The reasons for that is common sense: When you ...


2

As an addition to what has been said already, here are some exercises that will help you: The author is a podiatrist who is also a triathlete and minimalist/ barefoot runner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRS88R1BAg8 They helped me a lot (I do 80-90% of my training in MT10)


2

I have been in the same position as you. I have very flat feet, as well as overpronation (they often come together) and I was told I needed orthopedic inserts. I did that for a while, and it didn't work for me. I switched to VFF's, and I did so very carefully. I did all sorts of foot exercises that I found on their website and others, in preparation for ...


2

I experienced the same problem and I might have figured out the answer: The heat is caused by friction. This friction is produced because your feet can move within your shoe...so my suggestion is get some thicker, breathable socks.


2

Unfortunately, it's hard to impossible to tell what kind of running/plant style you have by looking down at your feet. Mainly, this is because you can't really see the mechanics of what your heel/ankle/foot are doing in relation to each other as you go through the land/plant/push cycle, especially when in shoes. It almost requires a rear view of some kind. ...


1

Pay attention to if your feet are rubbing or not, I find the socks I use make the difference. I tried some short basic cotton socks and my feet get very hot. Then I got some puma socks that are meant for running and breathe a lot (my shoes also breathe pretty well) and I noticed a major difference. Make sure your shoes are good for your feet. I'm not ...


1

I can sympathize with your problem. My feet get really hot when I'm running as well. My solution for the problem was to move to minimalist shoes, in my case, a set of Xero Shoes sandals. They don't work for everyone — and they do necessitate learning a different running technique for most people as you no longer have artificial cushioning around your heel, ...


1

I don't think there's any particular shoe you'd need, but a couple of things you won't need: Waterproofness. You're inside on a treadmill. Offroad / trial runners. They're generally heavier and can handle more traction which you won't need. High mileage rubber. The treadmill surface is much softer than a road, so you really don't need the durability. ...


1

I have a torn ACL and after wearing the Adidas Bostons, my knees have felt tons better. Note that I believe that I own 2013 versions. I've also worn Adidas's supernovas and they were quite comfortable (but a bit heavier, not by much)


1

It does sound like you have IT band syndrome. In addition to stretching as per Juha Untinen's answer, to prevent future IT band injuries, I strongly suggest doing these things: Clamshells Lie on your side as shown in the picture and move the top knee up and down. One side will be weaker than the other. Do 3 sets of 10 each on the weaker side. It is ...



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