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6

There really is no "conclusive" proof at the current time, and not likely to be any in the near future. Part of the problem is that Chi/Pose and the natural styles of running also have a very lucrative market for shoe companies. Pretty much every shoe company now makes minimalist type shoes, and there are entire companies (Newton) that make only fore/mid ...


5

It sounds like you're off to a great start with minimalist shoes. The first rule is to start slow and increase usage gradually, and you have done so. The shoes Make sure the shoes fit perfectly. You can get blisters and pain in minimalist shoes pretty easily, especially on long runs, if they don't fit perfectly or you're not wearing them correctly. Also, ...


5

The best thing you could probably do would be to find a dedicated runner's shop. We've got one where I live and they are really specializing in running shoes. A good runner's shop should be able to do several things for you: There should be trained employees, who are themselves runners (or do sports at least) and know what they do. They can assess your ...


5

Usually none. I tried several things including swimming "socks". It doesn't matter, sand gets in them and drives you nuts. Barefoot is the way to go. You will get used to it after just a couple weeks.


5

If you're just starting out running, you have a great opportunity to make the effort to learn correct form now before developing any bad habits. Minimalist shoes indeed can help to encourage a certain type of foot landing, because the lack of cushioning or heel rise makes it easier to land on the fore- or mid-foot and heel striking will feel uncomfortable or ...


4

Yes, people use this shoe: http://blogs.militarytimes.com/pt365/2013/06/11/review-hoka-one-ones-stinson-trail-shoes-look-like-clown-shoes-but-laugh-at-punishing-terrain/ Sara Davidson ran the Laurel Highlands 70-miler in them. In total, she has run about 400 miles in them and they're starting to need replacement. So, they didn't make it to the 800 miles ...


3

My guess is they don't quite fit. You might need a slightly bigger shoe, most places recommend a half size larger as your feet tend to swell(which is probably why it hurt after 20 mins). The other general recommendation is to have about a thumbs width between big toe and top of shoe (NYTimes, 2010). If your store has a generous return policy(as you ...


3

Yes! It's quite common for runners to change shoes, socks, shirts, etc. in the middle of a race. If you feel that it would be helpful for you then try it out in training and then implement it in some race. Update: answering @Pacerier's question Ultras have regular aid stations where you can get water (at least) and food. Many ultras will note particular ...


3

To make the transition you need to slowly incorporate minimalist shoes or you'll injure yourself. Even just walking. Your body will need time to adjust to forefoot striking. Its not like just buying another pair of padded sneakers. My first pair of Minimalist shoes are the New Balance Minimus Trails. The 10v2 model. True minimalist shoes have no heel to toe ...


2

A minimalist running shoe would be optimal, but I doubt that you should invest in one of those just to try forefoot striking. You can run and walk on your forefoot in every shoe, although the rigid sole or heavy cushioning might make things complicated. I started running on my forefoot last fall, the shoes I used weren't even proper running shoes (more like ...


2

I ran long distances for two years in minimalist shoes, and have just now realized that yes, minimalist shoes are great for improving your form and reducing injury, but they still mask just enough of your senses to make it harder to perfect your form—specifically, running efficiently with as little impact as possible. Also, minimalist shoes need to fit quite ...


2

I recently made the swap to Minimalist shoes adapting forefoot running. I had tried swapping my shoes for 4-6 hours at a time to start out with at work, since I walk all day long at work. That week was the worst because I had pushed myself too hard since I was so eager. My knees, shins, heels all screamed at me to knock it off. I took a step back into my ...


1

This is part of your problem. landing solidly on the heel Prior to the invention of cushioned shoes, most people ran using a mid-step or forefoot, rather than with a heel strike, because as you mentioned without cushioning, the pressure of a heel-strike impacts on the foot, ankle, knee and hips. There are plenty of questions on the site that address ...



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