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4

Aside from visiting an orthopedic doctor is there a way for people to learn what kind of foot type they have? Yes, easily! Just look at an old pair of shoes! Below we see two shoes, one old (left) and one new (right). As you can easily see, the left shoe shows excess wear on the outer toe. You've probably seen the kind of graphic below that relates ...


3

I am a veteran runner (and I have also suffered ITBS when I began to run). Even worse, I have what's called "Morton's Toe" so that I am not even supposed to be running according to orthopaedics and podiatrists I am very sceptic in regard to stability additions to shoes for beginners and gait analysis. The reasons for that is common sense: When you ...


2

That sounds exactly like what I had when training for my third half marathon after a long-ish break from running. In my case, it didn't really fall nicely into any "usual" description such as ITB-related problems. It was a chronic pain in the front and slightly to the outside of the hip, roughly near the joint between thigh and hip, but more to the side from ...


2

EVA is fine in moderation, and as others have said it wears/compresses relatively quickly. For the most part shoes are just tools. There are different types of shoes for different jobs; and any shoe/tool used improperly is going to be less efficient if not destructive. Running is an interesting sport in that everyone assumes they already know how to run. ...


2

As an addition to what has been said already, here are some exercises that will help you: The author is a podiatrist who is also a triathlete and minimalist/ barefoot runner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRS88R1BAg8 They helped me a lot (I do 80-90% of my training in MT10)


2

I have been in the same position as you. I have very flat feet, as well as overpronation (they often come together) and I was told I needed orthopedic inserts. I did that for a while, and it didn't work for me. I switched to VFF's, and I did so very carefully. I did all sorts of foot exercises that I found on their website and others, in preparation for ...


2

Unfortunately, it's hard to impossible to tell what kind of running/plant style you have by looking down at your feet. Mainly, this is because you can't really see the mechanics of what your heel/ankle/foot are doing in relation to each other as you go through the land/plant/push cycle, especially when in shoes. It almost requires a rear view of some kind. ...


1

I have a torn ACL and after wearing the Adidas Bostons, my knees have felt tons better. Note that I believe that I own 2013 versions. I've also worn Adidas's supernovas and they were quite comfortable (but a bit heavier, not by much)


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I think it's hit or miss and mostly related to the manufacturers. I've had great luck with some brands (like New Balance), and then the next model would seriously disappoint me. Even in the same model, small manufacturing chances can happen over each year (like the Brooks Cascadia series). Ironically enough I've had better longevity from minimalist shoes ...


1

It does sound like you have IT band syndrome. In addition to stretching as per Juha Untinen's answer, to prevent future IT band injuries, I strongly suggest doing these things: Clamshells Lie on your side as shown in the picture and move the top knee up and down. One side will be weaker than the other. Do 3 sets of 10 each on the weaker side. It is ...



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