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7

A marathon is altogether different league when compared to a 10 km run. There are many things to consider... Hydration. You should have a proper hydration plan in your long distance races. For 10 km races, you wouldn't probably have had hydration during the race course. In a marathon, I would advice you to start hydrating from the 5 km mark. From ...


7

For general fitness and endurance, 25 minutes, six days a week would be better. The best advice I've ever seen for running is: Run. Run lots. Mostly slow, sometimes fast. One of the best programs I've seen for running comes from a triathlon and cross country coach that I've talked with a few times, and it's 3:2:1. Say your longest run is 30 minutes. You ...


5

1. Measure up First of all, if you're serious about your weight loss and subsequent bulking, you may consider buying a body fat caliper. You'll get much more precise values and you'll be able to measure progress more accurately. If you're not willing to spend the money or are not sure you can use a caliper, The other solution is having a professional ...


4

Firstly congratulations on your marathon, and I hope you are pleased with your result. What I'm going to suggest is hard for marathon runners to do, but honestly it is the best thing to prevent injury and help you recover quickly. The best thing for you to do, is to stop running for 2-3 weeks. This is what people like Paula Radcliffe do, and we all know ...


4

Treadmill Video - Can be done on your own. Although imperfect, if you have access to a treadmill, you can set up your video camera and film your running form from the side, the back and the front if the treadmill doesn't block the view. I also think it helps to do both side views because there can be left -right differences. If you can hook your camera up ...


4

At the end of the day, calories in < calories out = weight loss. There is some mixed data about the amount of calories, and the textbook "3500 calories = 1 lb" is somewhat suspect according to more modern studies, and the way that different people react, but all the studies agree (Whether atkins, paleo, grapefruit, etc) that caloric deficit is the main ...


3

I've never extensively run stairs for training but they're far better than running flat (even that 20m hill is pretty flat). If your climbs are up to 8km (eeuch!) then you need to simulate that in training. I would probably starting progressing the stair run to be the equivalent. Bear in mind that an 8km is very difficult mentally - you need to be able to ...


3

From your posted schedule and your history mentioned in another comment I would think that running 1 long run per week at your current distance would be sufficient to keep you in shape to complete up to a half marathon with relatively low risk of injury (based on your stated history). Don't plan on being competitive, though. With only 1 slow long run a week ...


2

I wouldn't cut any of your workouts, as I wouldn't consider your current training sufficient for a 10k or a half marathon. Barely sufficient for a 5k. The key to running well and safely without injury is keeping up the volume sufficiently for the events you are training for. What I would personally do is find 15-20 minutes every single day to get out the ...


2

Unfortunately there's no quick fix to getting fit. When you say your shins are super tight - make sure this isn't shin splints, since it may put you out of the run altogether if you continue to train on it without proper care - you may want to google or youtube some videos to double check and be sure to stretch/rest them appropriately. In terms of calves, ...


2

Firstly, congratulations on your first marathon - that's a handy time to have. Secondly, spend a week or two just doing what you please and recovering. It takes a fair bit of mental energy and time to train for a marathon and most people feel a little deflated afterwards. Take the time to recharge a little. As to what to do: I would run what and when you ...


2

Your routine is fine for general weight loss and fitness, but I don't think (other than being able to complete the distance comfortably) that it is optimal for 5k training. I would recommend adding in a lot more running between now and then, being careful to not overdo the distance. Right now you are running 3 days a week, although you don't detail how much ...


2

No hypoventilation training is not dangerous for health if you do not try to hold your breath for as long as possible. This method must not be confused with an apnea competition! The exhalation and the breath holdings must be well measured while running, cycling or swimming. Actually, the main side effects that can occur in some individuals are headaches. ...


1

First, congrats on a great start into running! To answer your question: I don't think changing your workout for the 5k will harm your long-term goal of losing weight. I understand you are doing pretty much the same run three times a week. That's fine for beginners, so you don't have to change anything. But, with two months until your 5k race, now is a good ...


1

What you're doing is already really terrific. This regiment helps to build your endurance and lung capacity immensely. As a normal match for soccer is 90 minutes, what your doing should suffice, but something you can do is try and increase that 60 minute marker. If you can run for a solid 90 minutes and only be a little winded by the end, this will be ...


1

I would start adding extra runs on your other days, until you are able to run 4-6 days per week easily. Running isn't as much about how hard you work (Although that is a factor to some extent), but how much you work. The more intensity that you add to your running, the more you increase your chance for injury, especially if you don't have a lot of base ...


1

A technique that has proven useful to me is to run barefoot on pavement and gravel. The roughness of the surface maximizes the sensory input to your feet, and the hardness of the surface calls attention to any excessive impacts or inefficiencies further up the foot/leg/knee/hip joints. I often run the first mile or two of a workout barefoot on pavement as a ...


1

Are repeated climbs on a small hill comparable to a single climb up a larger hill, in terms of training for miles-long climbs in the race? No, not really, but so what? If you can visit the multiple hills several times a week then I would do that a lot. I would then add the one large hill as part of your long run(s) on the weekend. Hills are great ...


1

Given the risk of getting caught in the race & shutting down pain signals from your body -> worse injuries, I would skip the race. For example, see this article. Even if it is a bit old (1992), it states that running as an exercise has a high frequency of injuries and one of the main causes is competition. Naturally, you can be injured in all sports and ...


1

Run the half - don't run the marathon. A base of 15km is not enough for a full and you'll cause more damage if you try. The heel inflamation is a signal from your body that you're doing too much too soon. You should be able to run a pretty good half and then go back for the full next year.


1

I run 60 min every single day and every time I come back home I feel very well and satisfied of another successful day! Most of the time I run quite slowly and I speed up at maximum 1-3 times during this hour. It depends on how I feel on the determinate day. I lost a lot of weight. Any advice? Just move your body. The more you run the more you lose. ...


1

I would pick 3 days per week, as it's more sustainable. You get 2 sets of 1 rest day, and 1 set of 2 rest days. So you can aim to run every second day, and if something comes up preventing it, you can easily just run the next day, and that became your 2 day rest. If you have to take 2 days of on a 6 day per week program, you've suddenly knocked yourself down ...



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