Hot answers tagged

9

A marathon is altogether different league when compared to a 10 km run. There are many things to consider... Hydration. You should have a proper hydration plan in your long distance races. For 10 km races, you wouldn't probably have had hydration during the race course. In a marathon, I would advice you to start hydrating from the 5 km mark. From ...


8

For general fitness and endurance, 25 minutes, six days a week would be better. The best advice I've ever seen for running is: Run. Run lots. Mostly slow, sometimes fast. One of the best programs I've seen for running comes from a triathlon and cross country coach that I've talked with a few times, and it's 3:2:1. Say your longest run is 30 minutes. You ...


8

If you're trying to lose weight my suggestion is to focus on your diet. Focus on eating less calories than you are expending and you will lose weight. Exercise is great for your health but will do little (relative to dieting) for your weight. Since you're just starting to exercise I suggest not trying to do too much too soon as it may result in injury and ...


6

With the exception of a track event, most everything else will have hills. I've heard hill repeats referred to as "speed work in disguise". What they have in common is rather than the steady-state output you can build up on the flats, you need the ability to generate a lot more output, and then recover quickly back to your steady-state maintainable race ...


6

Programs There are programs already made for you. Examples: http://stronglifts.com/5x5/ http://startingstrength.com/ Your current program As for the program you're doing right now, it's no good, I'm afraid. There's nothing wrong with the exercises, but the fact that you do the same amount of reps, same amount of sets, same amount of weight every time. ...


5

The authors of the popular C25K program have written the "Bridge to 10k" program which is intended for people who have successfully completed C25K and starts with "Run 10 min/walk 1 min Repeat x 4" and there is a program "Ease into 10K" by the same authors which starts with "Run 3 min/walk 1 min Repeat x 5". The latter program is intended for somebody who ...


5

Treadmill Video - Can be done on your own. Although imperfect, if you have access to a treadmill, you can set up your video camera and film your running form from the side, the back and the front if the treadmill doesn't block the view. I also think it helps to do both side views because there can be left -right differences. If you can hook your camera up ...


5

From your posted schedule and your history mentioned in another comment I would think that running 1 long run per week at your current distance would be sufficient to keep you in shape to complete up to a half marathon with relatively low risk of injury (based on your stated history). Don't plan on being competitive, though. With only 1 slow long run a week ...


5

1. Measure up First of all, if you're serious about your weight loss and subsequent bulking, you may consider buying a body fat caliper. You'll get much more precise values and you'll be able to measure progress more accurately. If you're not willing to spend the money or are not sure whether you can use a caliper, The other solution is having a ...


5

Firstly congratulations on your marathon, and I hope you are pleased with your result. What I'm going to suggest is hard for marathon runners to do, but honestly it is the best thing to prevent injury and help you recover quickly. The best thing for you to do, is to stop running for 2-3 weeks. This is what people like Paula Radcliffe do, and we all know ...


5

I think breaking 3 hours or better for a marathon or 1.20 for half is very unlikely on training just at the weekends. Of course it depends on your starting point, and if you do lots of other cardio work during the week. Even if you are extremely talented, you still have to train to get the good results. I know many people who run sub 3 hour marathons, and ...


5

Nowadays, most training plans for Marathons, includes both lots of LSR and later a fair bit of speed work. The common idea is to first build up your ability to run long distances on fat and later add speed. As the first part will inevitably slow you pace a bit over time, the later part is needed to get the speed back into the run. E.g. the first 8-12 ...


5

Basic speed workouts have these benefits: Fast twitch muscle fiber recruitment: speed work is one of the only ways to recruit fast twitch muscle fibers. If you do sprint training, your body will learn how to recruit those muscle fibers for faster running in workouts and when finishing races. Puts a large amount of stress on the central nervous system: by ...


5

I cannot tell whether running 21+ km once a week is too much for you body, but I can say that I have done this weekly for the last 2 years (give and take) without any major problems. Just LSR (long slow runs), not races every week! I do 8-12 HM races a year and usually 2-3 marathons. One old rule-of-thump is that you should run 1.5 x you target distance on ...


5

With only a month to go before your target event, and not having been running for the last 3 months you are going to have difficulty getting into really good shape. Generally when training for any event it takes a few months of basic training followed by a few months of more specialised training to get the best results. However, that doesn't stop you from ...


4

At the end of the day, calories in < calories out = weight loss. There is some mixed data about the amount of calories, and the textbook "3500 calories = 1 lb" is somewhat suspect according to more modern studies, and the way that different people react, but all the studies agree (Whether atkins, paleo, grapefruit, etc) that caloric deficit is the main ...


4

In my opinion the furthest I would go in training pre marathon is about 22 miles. And I would only do 1 of these. The rest of the long runs I would suggest should be between 18-20 miles. The reason I say this, is that running the full 26 miles takes a lot out of you, and I think would have a negative affect on the actual marathon rather than a positive. ...


4

A general rule of running is to gradually increase your miles by no more than 10% per week. So a 10 mile week can turn into an 11 mile week. There are a lot of marathon training calendars you can find online that will give you the day-by-day schedule. Often these require shorter (and faster) days on Monday and Wednesday, with a longer and slower run (aimed ...


4

What you’ve described is not an average training routine in my opinion. You’ve got a pretty heavy workload if you consider holding a job as well. You make no mention of the amount of weight, sets, or reps that you perform, so, I’ll assume from your description of not trying to build muscle, that those numbers are sufficiently low. Effectively, you’re ...


4

Take a look of a "Constant Effort" table of Calories burned running and walking page at FellRnr.com. That site is a treasure trove of all kind of running related data


4

Since you have 8 weeks left you have plenty of time to build your LSD base. Lets assume that your 21k was your week one, the rest of your LSD runs would look something like two weeks of increased distance, followed by an easy week, then another two weeks. You should then taper your last 2-3 weeks before your race. I think at the 30k distance you can make ...


4

Like Alex L mentioned in a comment, your program completely lacks progressive overload, which is how we actually get stronger. Progressive overload is the increase of intensity that we place on our body, and we do this in two ways; increasing the resistance by using more weight increaseing the volume by doing more sets and repetitions Unless you go to ...


3

Unfortunately there's no quick fix to getting fit. When you say your shins are super tight - make sure this isn't shin splints, since it may put you out of the run altogether if you continue to train on it without proper care - you may want to google or youtube some videos to double check and be sure to stretch/rest them appropriately. In terms of calves, ...


3

Firstly, congratulations on your first marathon - that's a handy time to have. Secondly, spend a week or two just doing what you please and recovering. It takes a fair bit of mental energy and time to train for a marathon and most people feel a little deflated afterwards. Take the time to recharge a little. As to what to do: I would run what and when you ...


3

I've never extensively run stairs for training but they're far better than running flat (even that 20m hill is pretty flat). If your climbs are up to 8km (eeuch!) then you need to simulate that in training. I would probably starting progressing the stair run to be the equivalent. Bear in mind that an 8km is very difficult mentally - you need to be able to ...


3

I wouldn't cut any of your workouts, as I wouldn't consider your current training sufficient for a 10k or a half marathon. Barely sufficient for a 5k. The key to running well and safely without injury is keeping up the volume sufficiently for the events you are training for. What I would personally do is find 15-20 minutes every single day to get out the ...


3

Run. Keep running. Run again. Run again. Run again. With your prior running experience, you'll likely be surprised at how quickly you're able to return to running, even with your current state. It'll be tough the first couple weeks, but (especially with the past experience) you'll be able to reach a point where a slow jog feels easy. This slow jog has a ...


3

If you can't run 10k without stopping, then you are either running too far, or too fast for your current fitness. I would recommend a program created by a cross country coach named Barry Pollack, dubbed the 3:2:1 program. In this, you have 6 runs per week, 3 short, 2 medium and one long. Your medium run is double your short runs, and your long run is 3x ...


3

I agree with @jsmith but all the plans tend to follow a few specific guidelines. Here are the ones I'm following: Build up to at least 20 miles 1-2 months before a marathon race. Run all long runs ( +16 miles) at an easy pace. Do one long run every week but run your longest long runs every other weekend at the most. Aside from running for distance for the ...


3

I would use the half marathon. The half marathon plan should give you the most complete training for the other distances, as some of the finer details in a half marathon plan are going to be a different emphasis than a 5k plan. If you do the 5k or 10k plans, they may or may not give you enough distance work for the 15k and the half, and may place a little ...



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