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6

For the most part, the science is still unclear on the long term effects of things like long distance running on the body. Some studies have suggested that it can be bad for knee cartilage (in beginners), but goes on to say that their findings were likely not clinically relevant due to experimental error (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24045919). Other ...


3

There is a concept known as "training stress". When you put stress on your system and then give your body time to recover, you will improve. When you started, it was easy for you to put stress on your system, but over time, your body adapted, and now you only put enough stress on your system to stay where you are. The solution is to change up what you are ...


3

Based on your description this sounds like a very common side stitch (see the wiki entry here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Side_stitch). As explained in the article (which was informative for me even though I have experienced these off and on when exercising for as long as I can remember) there can be a few factors causing this. For me, it generally ...


3

Sounds possible that you have shin splits http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin_splints They will go away with some time off. This is common with individuals who are new to the level of training that are taking on. My recommendation is to rest for 3 days and start again (rest means you don't have to stop training, just don't do what you have been) As ...


2

You have the right idea for the first couple weeks, especially if you have never done much running previously. It will take a little while for running to feel smooth and natural in a manner which allows for longer time and distance runs. Depending on your fitness level, it may make sense to break these early runs into parts, e.g. do 3x5 minutes, as a way of ...


2

As for the number of sets and reps, that depends on what your goal is, and what part of periodization you are in. If you are aiming at increasing strength and speed in running i suggest you do 1-4 reps at above 85% for all exercises. I am a sprinter and this is what I do. It will increase your speed potential, so that you exert less force when you run at X ...


2

A few thoughts... Dehydration is a common trigger, and it's easy for that to happen if you work out for long periods. Milk of magnesia is your friend. It works by changing the osmotic balance of your intestines and keeping more water in the intestinal tract, making things softer. Great when you are having issues. I cycled regularly with hemmorhoids and not ...


2

You should be aiming to hold a specific pace. It's not "impossible" to hold within a second or two for every lap, just about any decent college runner can run 4 laps and tell you his time (without a watch) within a couple seconds for each one. This is just pacing experience. For the intervals you describe, you want the entire effort to be as consistent as ...


2

Based on your times, I'd recommend moving your goal to 1:40 per lap, and then go no faster than 1:38 on any lap. The idea of shooting for a specific time works because as you get tired, you still have that goal in mind, and can work harder to reach it for each interval. You start out well under your goal on July 30th, but even by the 3rd interval you're ...


1

I did some quick research, and it appears your best bet is the Zephyr HxM monitor. Most of the apps which it lists as compatible should work with your version of android, as should the Bluetooth connection. To be sure about compatibility, I recommend calling or emailing Zephyr before you purchase, as I could not find specific requirements listed anywhere, ...


1

You are doing intervals to put an intense load on your system. It's important to keep that load relatively constant to get the best benefit from them. You can also use this to tell if you need to stop early; when an interval gets lots slower than the previous one, you are done for the set (and perhaps for the day if you're doing multiple sets). I don't do ...


1

As per LarissaGodzilla's comment, this is likely a exercise related transient abdominal pain, commonly known as a "Side stitch". Surprisingly enough, no one knows for certain why they happen, but the Wikipedia article linked above gives some advice for how to avoid them. Also: What causes side stitches? and What to do against side stitch? on this site.


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Importance of Equal Hip Strength Bilaterally This Clinical Review found weaknesses in hip abductors, external rotators and hip flexors on the involved side as compared to the uninvolved side in runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) and iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS). So an important factor is the strength of one hip relative to the other, ...


1

If you've seen benefits from it, keep doing it. Regardless of how it compares to other sorts of exercises, if it is working for you, then it is most definitely "valuable exercise". The only point I could attempt to make in support of your friend would be to say that running in place likely will not be as beneficial if you're trying to build up endurance ...


1

Bicycling can easily quantify this with modern power meters. This site has a calculator that lets you see the loss in power and speed as altitude increases. And you can compare acclimatized versus non-acclimatized athletes. http://www.cyclingpowerlab.com/effectsofaltitude.aspx As you can see by the chart, the change is fairly insignificant at 500m or ...



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