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6

The BOSU ball (or half ball) is used in rehab and fitness training for a variety of reasons. Balancing on the disc while doing movements, activities and exercise engages the nervous system to fine-tune muscle control which improves or controls joint positioning. This is particularly important in rehabilitation where the joint position sense* has been ...


5

I don't think you'll be able to survive for very long doing 3 hours of running (as an example) eating 1500 calories a day. 2,000 - 3,000 calories per day of deficit (depending on your needs) is really hard. I'm assuming this is for weight loss, and I think you'll have much better results following the tried and true mechanisms for fat loss and body ...


3

Always check with your doctor before attempting a new exercise program, especially if as in your case you have a problem. Although you have "flat feet" you may also have other problems that cause pain and swelling of your lower legs with walking or running. Your doctor will give you a diagnosis and may suggest a podiatrist (foot doctor) or physical therapy ...


3

The Minimum Amount of Exercise Is A Lot Running a few times a week is not sufficient for general health and fitness. Major health science organizations recommend strength training in addition to aerobic work. For instance, the CDC says that according to the evidence, Adults need at least: 2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of ...


3

It all depends on how you feel and what your goals are. A marathon runner will look at that and laugh and say you're not even close to "general fitness". I complete couch potato will look at you and be amazed at your determination and work ethic. It's all relative. In my opinion, you shouldn't be aiming for general fitness, you should be aiming to always ...


2

Certainly there have been many studies, as Sean Duggan referenced, asserting appetite-inhibition effects of exercise. I have never seen much more than educated speculation as to the root cause (e.g., certain hormone levels). For example, according to a paper by David Stensel published in Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism: The mechanisms by which acute ...


2

My habit is to go for a short run before committing to a race after an injury. What I'm looking for is any modifications to my running gait because of the injury. I know from experience that if I have to modify something because of pain then I simply shouldn't run. Otherwise, toughen up and run the race; even if just for more race experience.


1

There are a few things to look out for when you sustain an injury to the knee: Swelling - If you have a large amount of swelling in the area, you may have ruptured or injured the bursa sac, which can cause inflammation Offset patella (Kneecap) - Unlikely, since you can run, but a direct blow to the kneecap can throw it out of the track it normally rides ...


1

Yes and no. If you're worried about permanent damage, pain is often the indicator that lets you know something is wrong. Therefore you should NOT take medication which inhibits pain. Instead, you could give the 5k a shot, but abort if the pain gets too substantial. But if, as you suspect, it's really just a minor injury, then the pain can of course be ...


1

Cycling is a wonderful cardiovascular exercise and it limits bouncing and impact (assuming you're on smooth paved roads or groomed trails mostly) which helps with some larger breast issues AND is gentler on your limbs than running. Running is nicely complimented by cycling and you may see that you have less pain in joints if you supplement your cardio ...


1

There aren't any accurate equations, without data from an ECG and face mask based gas analyzers. The best you can do without a true heart rate and O2 measures is to estimate a VO2max figure, and convert that into a Kcal one: Kcal/Min ~= 5 calories * massKg * VO2 / 1000 The ACMS Running VO2max equation will give a number that's accurate within: +/-14.5% ...


1

The physics of this can be boiled down to Newton's 3rd law; For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. This is the physical law which dictates that if I push you, you automatically push me back. The reason why you fall and I don't, is that my stance was more balanced (I was leaning into into it because I was ready for it, as the ...


1

It depends on your goal as a runner; are you looking to compete? Or perhaps you are just looking to maintain good cardiovascular fitness, or lose weight? What is necessary for all runners, regardless of your overall goal is to protect yourself against potential injury. A study by Runner's World put the annual injury rate for runners at 66%. The most common ...



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