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3

I recommend Strava. It lets you find segments (trails) in your area using your GPS, and they are created and curated by the community, but also moderated by... well, moderators. It lets you look at segments by length, whether it's flat or hilly, and the level of inclination/steepness. I assume that's what you mean by "difficulty"? It keeps track of your ...


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It seems that you've already answered above in the question. I'd just like to add at least two thoughts. 1st is that there are several running techniques, such as pose, and evolution running, two mention just two others, I believe that pelvic rotation should play a part in all of them, but perhaps in different ways. 2nd, is that it'd be useful if you post ...


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I bought the Spydergrip because I couldn't find anything better out there. I am glad I did because I will never go back to an armband. I love my Spyder.


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Bike and running both use the leg muscles. They don't focus on "different" muscles, it's the same muscles producing the same type of motion with a different emphasis on where the power is placed. Can you improve one by doing the other? It depends. If you are at the low end of the scale (just starting, getting back into shape, etc) then yes, running can help ...


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I use this waistpack from Nike. It's literally just a small fanny pack. It's just big enough to fit my phone (Galaxy S6) comfortably but it can fit my wallet in it as well. I also keep my keys on a small carabiner, so I can clip them onto the waistband if I'm just walking around. I usually just have my headphones' wire behind me, down my back, and the ...


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There are two big mistakes that most amateur runners make. They go too hard on their easy days, and not hard enough on their hard days. This usually means they don't get as much out of their speedwork as they could, and they don't go easy enough to really get a good recovery. For the average runner targeting a 5k, they can usually get by with 30ish miles a ...


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As Atul points out, creating a "standard" difficulty rating is not easy, as people have various level of skills, physical abilities and training. However, this problem applies to any sport that uses trails as a primary pathway. The International Mountain Biking Association has a basic primer on how to try this. Note, they only address technical difficulty, ...


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Finding precise studies seems to be hard, but I think we might be dealing with two factors: psychological and physiological. On a psychological level, there is habit formation. Taking an extract from Wikipedia: Habit formation is the process by which a behaviour, through regular repetition, becomes automatic or habitual. This is modelled as an increase ...


2

Your problem is either medical or expectation-based. Are you expecting it to be as easy? You are going uphill and so are working your muscles a lot more. You are in the Anaerobic zone for incline runs which is not the pleasant experience you will get when running in the aerobic zone. Go to a doctor and explain all of your ailments. You could ask to be ...


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You might experience leg fatigue because of incorrect posture or technique while running. Running in a straight line and at a constant speed tends to be more efficient compared with running erratically or at various speeds. Lowering your center of gravity while running could increase your balance and power, making it easier to run without becoming fatigued.


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If it is shin splints, as per your picture, the first step is top stop running for a bit and to ice the area to reduce inflammation. To be perfectly frank, the pain you're feeling is due to injury, and continuing to operate despite the injury risks courting greater damage. This is also important because stress fractures are sometimes mistaken for shin ...


1

One way is to stop running, at least for a while. Like other bone injuries shin splints can take a long time to heal, several weeks or longer. Try stopping for a week and see if your legs feel better. This is why it is important to start slowly when you start running again and not do too much too quickly. Start off running one day a week, then slowly ...


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For trail running I've found All Trails to be the perfect companion. You can find just about any trail, nationwide, and most people rate it (hardness + overall quality of the trial). It's definitely worth the download and try. I think you'll find it useful in your new ventures. Enjoy!


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I believe the answer is that both are correct. In general a beginner at any physical pursuit improvement will come from regular 2x per week sessions, but improvements will come faster at 3x per week. However, humans are all different, we adapt to training stimulus at different rates, we have various different issues with our gait, leg lengths etc that can ...


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Quite honestly, it's hard to give you a direct answer because this is a highly individual thing. My experience with the C25k program as someone more or less starting from scratch was that the 3 times a week schedule did not lead to shin splints or knee problems. Frankly, the ramp up is slow enough that you're walking for a good bit of the time, and by the ...


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First, I'll echo Alec's comment. If you've been diagnosed with spinal stenosis, you should seek the advice of a qualified therapist. Additionally, you may wish to get another opinion and an MRI as x-rays are not the best indicator of spinal stenosis: The X-rays can show the doctor various signs associated with spinal stenosis, including loss of the ...



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