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3

Based on your times, I'd recommend moving your goal to 1:40 per lap, and then go no faster than 1:38 on any lap. The idea of shooting for a specific time works because as you get tired, you still have that goal in mind, and can work harder to reach it for each interval. You start out well under your goal on July 30th, but even by the 3rd interval you're ...


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You should be aiming to hold a specific pace. It's not "impossible" to hold within a second or two for every lap, just about any decent college runner can run 4 laps and tell you his time (without a watch) within a couple seconds for each one. This is just pacing experience. For the intervals you describe, you want the entire effort to be as consistent as ...


2

Runner's World has got this completely covered here. The gist of it: Run until you're breathing hard, then put one hand on your belly and one on your chest, and breathe so the bottom hand moves and the top hand doesn't. I also found two of their three exercises helpful: the "Hundred", where you lie on your back with legs raised slightly and pump your arms ...


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You'll be able to complete this marathon - you just won't be able to complete it fast. The key for you right now is to start getting comfortable with running longer distances. You didn't mention what pace you typically run at, so I'm going to assume it's 8mph for the sake of calculations (you can adjust depending on what it actually is). If you feel good ...


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If I'm starting running again after a long hiatus (I don't run much when we have a new baby so as to help my wife out) I do stationary barefoot running at a low (130-140 bpm) heart rate for 2 or 3 weeks both to build up the strength in my feet and to start conditioning my respiratory system. I start with 15 minutes every other day for a week or so, then ...


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There will certainly be a benefit from stationary running as compared to sitting and doing nothing. Of course Treadmill running gives you the advantage of moving forward and actually setting a speed pace. If you can't use a treadmill and you don't want to go outside then stationary running is a good alternative.


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I would tell your coach where you are sore then have them give you specifically watch your form during your training and during your races. It could be that your form is great when you are strong but as you tire it degrades and you are overcompensating on one leg. This will cause your other leg to work less. This would explain the imbalance. I would also ...


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You are doing intervals to put an intense load on your system. It's important to keep that load relatively constant to get the best benefit from them. You can also use this to tell if you need to stop early; when an interval gets lots slower than the previous one, you are done for the set (and perhaps for the day if you're doing multiple sets). I don't do ...


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The general consensus in the athlete population, and between trainers as well, is that the cause is unknown. However, in med-school I was told that it is, at least in the medical community, known. And in my pathology book, which was in Serbian though (but translated from an American one; I don't remember which one). The idea is that classical side stitch ...


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There are times when your heart rate monitor will not measure the correct rate. For example if you chest is too dry or two wet or it is moving around and you loose connection. My Garmin HR monitor will often read my initial heart rate at 225 bpm for the first couple of minutes. I know my HR is not that high. (Actually physically counted it once when it read ...


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Unless your legs feel sore, I think it is ok to go without a break. If your legs are sore, take a day break and catch up with rest :) And no, that isn't really enough to see results. Rather going on distance, go on calories burnt, which your treadmill will tell you. Try to shoot at 300 calories minimum, and if you like mix it up with different machines ...



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