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When you say breathe in, L, R, L, R; breathe out, L, R, L, R we like to call this 4:4. That is 4 steps on inhale, 4 steps on exhale. This study tries to analyze some of the breathing dynamics of humans during running. While it's pretty long and technical, it's been written about in more layman's terms here. The gist of it suggests that a 2:1 pattern ...


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It depends why you're running. If you're running to build your general aerobic and cardiovascular fitness, the rule of thumb I learned in the US Marine Corps is not to follow a particular breathing pattern, but to aim for a certain level of exertion. You should be breathing in a way that allows you to talk, but not sing. If you can sing at a normal tempo, ...


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If humans run, their breathing is not connected to their stride. Why don't you just breath the way it is comfortable with you? Especially when you just started to run, you shouldn't worry about anything like breathing patterns. Just try to find the "fun" in running!


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You might be interested in reading this about the research of the late prof. Buteyko: @MR04: "controlling your breathing and taking in large breaths increases blood flow and provides oxygen faster to your brain and the rest of your body." Not necessarily. If you lose too much CO2 by breathing too much, you'll actually reduce available oxygen for the ...


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Just to provide some background, lightning is a real problem and causes a lot of casualties. From Medicine for Mountaineering, 6th Edition: Lightning was the second most common cause of weather-related death over the forty-year period from 1962 to 2002. Only floods, many of which are also produced by thunderstorms, killed more people during this ...


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Based on the information in the answer to a question on the benefits on the benefits of running in the heat, you may indeed be reaping some benefits. At least one study shows: Heat acclimation improves the body’s ability to control body temperature, improves sweating and increases blood flow through the skin, and expands blood volume allowing the heart ...


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If your goal is general fitness then you're doing plenty of running, walking, and swimming, but your deadlift is quite light. Sixteen reps is also a lot for the deadlift. If it's possible to use more weight but fewer reps per set, do that. 60kg to 100kg should be entirely doable for you within a few months. Other ways to get good use out of your limited ...


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There are two main ways to decrease the size of a muscle; Don't use the muscle Or at least use it only when necessary. If you don't use the muscle, it won't be hypertrophied. From there, it could remain at its current size, or decrease in size (atrophy). Overuse the muscle (not recommended) Basically, if you use the muscle a lot, but don't provide it ...


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Like @Mårten said, you either lose fat over your entire body, or nowhere at all. You can't pick and choose where to gain/lose fat. As for losing then gaining weight, the difference lies in your diet. You mention that you dieted when you lost weight, and after that you started to gain weight again. This should be a telltale sign. And it's a well-established ...


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You cannot burn fat in a specific location, legs do not use only leg fat, and so on. If you want less fat on your legs you will need to reduce fat overall.


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Short while ago i did dinghy sailing for a couple of hours. The wind was strong but i was sailing with little effort under reduced sail. My heart rate was very high not because of physical exertion but out of alertness. My watch predicted that i burnt 1.800 calories in two and a half hours which is waay off. The formula does not include factors driven by ...


1

I have been working out with the Suunto Foot Pod Mini since 2012 and I have to admit that I love this gadget. It measures your current speed and distance and is compatible with the HR monitors (watches) from Suunto (e.g. Suunto t6d or Suunto M5) and quite accurate (measured 31,3km on a 31,1km run, I think that is an acceptable deviation). Furthermore it does ...


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Worth noting, without data from an ECG (heart rate monitor) and face mask based gas analyzers, along with details of the gradient, wind speed, and surface there aren't any accurate equations. The best you can do is to estimate a VO2 (mL·kg-1·min-1) figure, and convert that into a Kcal one: Kcal/Min ~= respiratoryExchangeRatio * massKg * VO2 / 1000 ...



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