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1

A study on Ironman triathletes found that supplementing sodium during a triathlon had no real effect on blood sodium. (source)


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Go for maximal strength workouts. Those develop strength rather than mass. And, follow these other nine steps in the link below. Sorry for linking a "men's fitness" page but the principles are very sound nevertheless :) http://www.mensfitness.com/training/build-muscle/10-ways-build-strength-without-size


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Among elite runners, the mileage loads and base training doesn't differ that much between the 5K, 10K, and half marathon distances (q.v. Marty Liquori's Real Running). That being said, in the case of a beginner runner I would use the following rule of thumb. If you cannot comfortably complete the distance at tempo pace, then you probably should not attempt ...


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I find it hard to define a regimented schedule that you can follow for that span of time. The main advice you can follow for any distance is that you have to listen to your body as you go. Good nutrition and hydration must also be maintained. And at each level you also want to keep your training interesting so that you stick with it. 5k 12 weeks gives you ...


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Don't let anyone tell you what you can't do. They key is to listen to your body, build up gradually, and create a routine. If necessary, alternate between different forms of exercise. I am almost the same weight/build as you and can run 10k. But I would not do that on two consecutive days. Start easy, and don't get discouraged. It gets easier if you don't ...


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I think we all have genetic predispositions when it comes muscles. I find it very difficult to build up my chest, but have no problem building muscle in other areas. If would continue squatting and performing other lower body exercises, I would cut back on the volume quite a bit and maintain the intensity (weight/tension). Not knowing what your current ...


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Please please don't let your weight put you off running, or any sport. I ran when I was around your weight (I started at 148kg but didn't take up running til I'd lost some) and lost weight doing it. This article shows me running a 10k race and as you can see I am not a stereotypical running size (if there is such a thing). ...


2

This worked for me and so here it is. Focus on keeping your feet beneath your hips. Or, to push your hips over your feet, whatever visualization works best for you. You should almost feel like your hips are leading the run, not your feet. THIS really helps in shortening your stride. Optional but very helpful: wear minimal footwear or no footwear at all ...


2

Warming up is performed before a performance or practice. Athletes, singers, actors and others warm up before stressing their muscles.A warm up generally consists of a gradual increase in intensity in physical activity.So WARM UP is ALWAYS DONE BEFORE WORK OUT. On the other hand Stretching is a form of physical exercise in which a specific muscle or tendon ...


4

I can sympathize with your desire to increase your running cadence. Several years ago I learned that most top mid/long distance runners have a cadence around 180 steps per minute (SPM). While the reason for this rate is outside the scope of this question, I will say that running economy is optimized for most trained runners at around 180 SPM. I read this ...


3

You are basically looking at the difference between static stretching, which is the traditional "sit, reach and hold" type that everyone is familiar with, and dynamic stretching, which is movement gradually increasing in amplitude that mimics the activity about to be done. What Dave and Michael are suggesting is dynamic stretching. Absolutely do this if you ...


4

Here are a few thoughts: You increased your mileage by 100% (3M per day to 6M per day). By running standards, this is a HUGE increase in volume. During a building phase, trained runners generally increase volume by approximately 10% per week, and then only for a few weeks before backing off again. This modest rate of increasing volume is purposeful: Allow ...


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Focus on performing a dynamic warm up first. It is involves activating the working muscles and taking them through a full range of motion. Running with high knees, jumping jacks, mountain climbers, duck unders. These are a lot more effective than static stretching.


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Cycling would indeed be a better option until you don't lose some extra useless load. Also, consider step aerobics which you can do at home. By the way, running with a proper form and skipping with skill aren't as traumatic as they would be if done improperly (this would require a very long answer, but in a few words, that is: running by landing on your ...


1

Marty Liquori, in his 1982 book Real Running, discusses both warming up and stretching. He says that stretching is "overrated, period," except in the case of an injury area. This was at least a view held by many elite distance runners at the time of the book's publication. But Liquori does stress the importance of warming up before a run. Even an elite ...


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I've read that I should do warm-up before running and stretch after running. Is that correct? Yes. Do that. Warm up by running slowly and gradually increasing the pace, or with dynamic stretching movements like lunges, air squats, leg swings, running sideways or backwards, swinging the arms, and trunk rotations.


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That sounds exactly like what I had when training for my third half marathon after a long-ish break from running. In my case, it didn't really fall nicely into any "usual" description such as ITB-related problems. It was a chronic pain in the front and slightly to the outside of the hip, roughly near the joint between thigh and hip, but more to the side from ...


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I have personal experience with shin splints, traditional "heel-cushioned" running shoes, and barefoot running in Vibrams and without shoes at all. For many years I suffered from extremely painful shin splints. I asked for advice on how to get rid of it every time I met a fellow runner, but the solutions suggested to me didn't give a clear picture; run ...


2

You should probably get checked out by a doctor just to make sure you don't have any type of illness or ailment that needs to get treated medically; there are some nasty things out there that can present themselves as heavy legs. Assuming you get a green light from your doctor, you may need to adjust your training a bit. You're probably either over or ...



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