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You often see people looking at the bottom of a running shoe to see if it needs replacing, for example by seeing whether it has much “tread” left. This is not the right test of whether a shoe is finished: the main determinant of the longevity of a shoe is not the extent of wear to the outer sole, it is the compression of the mid-sole, which is the spongy ...


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The following is conjecture based on the limited information provided by the question: It's possible that you've accumulated some muscle in that time frame, if you were doing little to no exercise prior to your gym membership. Effectively, your body makes some of the basic adaptations pretty quickly in response to the changes in activity. However, it's ...


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Is very dificult with so less information to tell you something. First we should know what you are eating. Also, you need to know that a normal person can only get from 2kg to 3kg (about 5 lbs) of PURE muscle (not muscle gain due to water retention) in a year, so that is not posible in only one month. What happens when you start training is that your body ...


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I don't think they will help the achilles problem. My advice: You don't need to stop running necessarily, but you don't want it to get any worse. Start with active stretching (running drills), start running slowly and work up to the pace you are aiming for. You could also try heating your achilles up before you go run as well. Afterwards check out PNF ...


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I can't really understand how you need to clear your throat though if you don't have phlegm; what exactly are you clearing? Is it just a dry cough response (cold air?), or are you actually spitting something up? Phlegm production when doing cardio-type activities is pretty normal. Most cyclists and runners are hocking lugies everywhere. When I was running a ...


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First off, it's a great question. Let me dissect a few things first: healthy eating guy Very few people really have this one dialed in. Maybe you do, but odds are you don't. There's a great website I've used called Body Recomposition and the writer is a pretty qualified guy who goes into nutrition. Speed and endurance are the two primary levers you ...


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There are widely varying stances on optimal exercise heart rate, but there is some common ground that most people agree on. If you perform any kind of activity at maximal (or close to it) heart rates, your exercise duration will necessarily be brief, as your body simply can't store and use enough glycogen to support this kind of effort for long durations. ...


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Like many simplistic calculations, the typical estimate for maximum heart rate is just that, an estimate. It will work well for some people and not for other people. If you have a heart that is smaller than average, you will likely have a higher maximum heart rate. This is why many exercise programs use a perceived exertion scale rather than a heart rate ...


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Try stretching your soleus out a bit. The correct angle I've been taught is roughly 5-10% forward lean. It affects a lot, from heal strike to minimizing vertical bob. I'm not sure if you're bobbing around a lot but any energy sending you up and down is basically wasted. The catch is you don't want to lean forward at the waist or back, you want to lean ...


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I usually advise people to start by aiming for time, not distance. Shoot for 30 minutes, every other day. Run as much as you can, walk the rest, and try to run again. Don't push it too hard in the beginning: you'll likely be very sore which can make you miss workouts. You're filling up a bathtub one spoonful at a time, you can't rush the process. After a ...


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A better definition for maximum heart rate is the maximum heart rate your body can withstanding without causing damage (2002 study). You'll frequently see the reference to "220bpm - your age = your max heart rate". So for you that's 196, but of course that implies that every single 24 year old in the world has the exact same physiology which is untrue. To ...


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It's doubtful your heart rate was in sync; you can't really state that without monitoring. You can measure your stride: it's usually around 160 (strides per minute), with a lot of conventional running gurus touting 180 as better for a variety of reasons. Your breathing and stride can be matched up and this whole thing is known as locomotor-respiratory ...


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In addition to the answers already received, I would suggest you to do weight training for your legs in the gym. It develops mitochondria in your muscle cells, which play important role in (up)hill running.


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I am no expert, @Michał, so you are warned in advance. I have three remarks: You could consider a threadmill. This will give you any desired angle, your muscles may get proper training. Running up and down the staircase should be good too, certainly, but it wouldn't position your foot the way a steep road would. Running the staircase should be helpful ...


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So that's: ~50 miles. 3.8 mph (50/3.8 = 13.2) or 16 minutes/mile 792 minutes (13.2 * 60) = 4,391 calories (for a 170lb average person) Honey generally has 21 calories per 5ml, so that's 3 calories per ml. 4,391 (total calories) / 3 (calories per ml) = 1,463 ml. Feel free to double check my math on all of that, and it's based entirely on the average of a ...


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Many trail races have un-runnable hills (except for elites - and even for them. Ellie Greenwood (WS100 course record holder, current Comrades champ, etc.) is known for a spectactularly fast speed hiking style. Like most things in running it's down to what works for you. I would consider keeping upright so that your lungs get maximum air. You lean into the ...


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I don't think anyone is going to be able to give you a concrete answer as to whether or not you will be injury free in your race. Breaking down your question a bit, the things I notice are here: This morning (Thursday) I was running intervals on the treadmill, 4 minutes running - 1 minute walking, and I did them just a little faster than I usually ...



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