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I agree with everyone's comments above - check with your doctor to see if walking and/or running would be appropriate for your condition. And working with a physical therapist would help you establish an appropriate exercise program. Without good sensation, one of the biggest problems you could face is skin problems. Even a simple blister can turn into a ...


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"the only variables that influence speed are (1)cadence (2) stride length." Yes these two variables define your speed. But how to achieve high cadence of a longer time is a complex issue. "cadence has a very low upper bound. (170 strides / min) seems as high as possible." Wrong. Many recommend 180, so 170 isn't considered a very high cadence. "a stride ...


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This is a great question and one that I went through a number of years ago. The first thing I would do is caution you on the amount of mid-foot running you try to do. If you don't slowly adjust to doing this you will get many new injuries. Calf, Solious, Achilles, Plantar fascia. It needs to be a slow systematic approach. The first thing you can do is ...


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If I'm starting running again after a long hiatus (I don't run much when we have a new baby so as to help my wife out) I do stationary barefoot running at a low (130-140 bpm) heart rate for 2 or 3 weeks both to build up the strength in my feet and to start conditioning my respiratory system. I start with 15 minutes every other day for a week or so, then ...


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I would tell your coach where you are sore then have them give you specifically watch your form during your training and during your races. It could be that your form is great when you are strong but as you tire it degrades and you are overcompensating on one leg. This will cause your other leg to work less. This would explain the imbalance. I would also ...


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There will certainly be a benefit from stationary running as compared to sitting and doing nothing. Of course Treadmill running gives you the advantage of moving forward and actually setting a speed pace. If you can't use a treadmill and you don't want to go outside then stationary running is a good alternative.


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I am not sure if a Calf sleeve is going to solve your problem, it certainly won't hurt. Here is what I suggest: Stretch before you run Ice after and often during the day Take Ibuprofen to reduce the swelling Avoid hills if you can: The strain on your achilles is greater as you ascend a hill Slow down, the less strain you put on your achilles the less ...


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There are times when your heart rate monitor will not measure the correct rate. For example if you chest is too dry or two wet or it is moving around and you loose connection. My Garmin HR monitor will often read my initial heart rate at 225 bpm for the first couple of minutes. I know my HR is not that high. (Actually physically counted it once when it read ...


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Here is a list of some common reasons that lead to excessive sweating at various sites of the body: Low blood sugar levels, Metabolism related issues, Hyperthyroidism, Any disorder of the nerves or injury to the spinal cord, Stress or paranoia, Panic or anxiety attacks, Disease or infection of the liver, Hot flashes (especially in post menopausal ...


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The general consensus in the athlete population, and between trainers as well, is that the cause is unknown. However, in med-school I was told that it is, at least in the medical community, known. And in my pathology book, which was in Serbian though (but translated from an American one; I don't remember which one). The idea is that classical side stitch ...


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Runners are cooled by the surrouding air (when cooler than the body temperature), and by sweat vaporization. The higher the air temperature, the more we rely on vaporization for keeping cool. If the humidity is high, the air is more saturated with water, and vaporization becomes less effective. The body responds by sweating more. If both temperature and ...


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The problem is that while your muscles ache after training too much, your tendons, joints and bones will not. You won't notice that you're gradually working yourself into an injury, it will surprise you. My guess is that we all should "rest" more than we think we should, but definitely not "rest" by sitting in a chair or lying on the sofa. Just not exercise ...


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Runner's World has got this completely covered here. The gist of it: Run until you're breathing hard, then put one hand on your belly and one on your chest, and breathe so the bottom hand moves and the top hand doesn't. I also found two of their three exercises helpful: the "Hundred", where you lie on your back with legs raised slightly and pump your arms ...


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It's not easy to change your running style, and you will have to focus on it for a while. In time, the change will begin to feel natural, and you can transition back to focusing more on your speed, but for the time being you will need to focus to induce a change.


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You'll be able to complete this marathon - you just won't be able to complete it fast. The key for you right now is to start getting comfortable with running longer distances. You didn't mention what pace you typically run at, so I'm going to assume it's 8mph for the sake of calculations (you can adjust depending on what it actually is). If you feel good ...



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