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18

A very well thought out question. First, the technical term for holding your breath is called the Valsalva maneuver. In the world of weight lifting it has a distinct purpose: to increase the body's ability to protect the spine under heavy load. The Valsalva maneuver does not work alone. There's a pretty fair treatment of the subject on a Rebock Crossfit ...


8

Abs can be sufficiently trained via isometric exercise. I believe the safest way to exercise the abdominals is to use them for their intended function (stabilization) under a progressively increasing load or difficulty. For example: The co-contraction of the abdominals with the spinal erectors that is required during heavy squats and deadlifts in order to ...


8

Preference I collar my squats, deadlifts, and overhead presses just because it annoys the heck out of me if the plates slide around even an inch or two. The noise and the asymmetry irritate my aesthetic preferences. With squats, only once have I seen the plates move more than an inch or so, and it was a good indicator that my set had been sloppy. However, ...


5

You are only likely to fall off of a treadmill if you set it too high for your performance limits, or get distracted while exercising. People generally run in a fairly straight line, and if you are able to keep up with the treadmill's pace, then you shouldn't have any problem staying on. The videos you see are people that try to go from standing on the ...


5

There are a few considerations when running at night: Making yourself visible to others, i.e. motorists, cyclists, etc. Providing vision for yourself Where to look when running You don't want to be staring down at your feet. Like mountain biking or other high speed pursuits, you want to be looking a few feet ahead so that you know what is coming for ...


4

I can't answer this from a manufacturer's standpoint, but from a physics standpoint. Just to compare it to something familiar, this is entirely the same as if your car is running along a flat road, and you turn the engine off, you'll still keep rolling. Why? Momentum! First of all, if you disconnect the power while the treadmill is running, there would ...


4

Caveat: Proportions is an indicator of how your squat form could look. Actually measuring your limb and torso lengths and trying to mathematically deduce "correct" form is rarely beneficial, and can lead to someone trying too hard with a form that simply doesn't work for them. This is partly because no one has a handle on all of the significant factors that ...


4

My advice will be a bit different, but there's some preliminary things to understand first: Determine the nature of your soreness first: Back pump (where there is an uncomfortable tightness in the lower back) is normal and nothing to be concerned about. Sharp pain, or even a dull pain that is different from general tightness is a symptom of bad form which ...


4

The safety bars should be set a few inches below the lowest the bar could conceivably go during a successful squat. This way, if the squat goes wrong in any way, you just lower yourself to the bottom of your squat. Do this fast if necessary; release tension in the core, if necessary; jump forward (if the bar is on your back) or backward (if the bar is in ...


3

As AlexL suggests, since you are in a power rack, you can simply set the safeties to a couple inches below squat depth. Then if you need to bail, simply lower your squat beyond your usual squatting depth, rest the bar the safeties, and wiggle your way out. Similarly for the bench press. You should be able to set the safeties in such a way that when your ...


3

Great question! Especially coming before actually having had bail out (that's the terminology) of a squat. I'm guessing you're back squatting. When failing to stand up during a rep you'll at least have some power left to slow the weight down on the way back down. Use this opportunity and don't hesitate. Release your hands, sit up so the moves backwards, ...


3

First off, and most importantly - A belt should not be a fix for bad form! That said, a sore back is common when deadlifting. You should get a professional - a real professional - not your local gym-head or 5 $ a hour trainer to coach you. Good form is crucial, especially on heavy exercises. The money you invest in learning the basics will come back ...


3

IMO, a belt shouldn't be necessary until you get to a weight about 2 times your bodyweight, if even then. Fix your form, don't try to patch the problem with a belt. If your back is hurting, you're probably leaning forward and rounding your back to compensate for tight hip flexors or limited ankle dorsiflexion. Video or have someone else video you while you ...


2

After a quick research session, I can't find any research that shows that heavy lifting contributes to spinal disc degeneration. So, lift according to your goals, eg. more repetitions for hypertrophy or endurance, less reps for strength. Previously, heavy physical loading was the main suspected risk factor for disc degeneration. However, results of ...


2

If you're contagious or think you might be, why not just attempt the yoga at your house, and skip the class, and skip possible infection of others.... Also, I'm no doctor, but for sore throats, apple cider vinegar + water + honey = quick fix for sure. Just fast, allow your body to focus on rebuilding your immune system. Do some stretches and yoga, relax, ...


2

I can only give an anecdotal answer: I find that the tightness of the core from the intra-abdominal pressure added by a full breath becomes negligible once one develops a very strong squat. I think that for a strong squatter, the ability to move the same amount of weight likely exists regardless of breathing method. In my experience of trying many ...


2

No, it's not safe to exercise while in the shower. More importantly, the cost-benefit ratio is too high for this to be effective. Let's consider the "supposed" benefits: 1. Burning calories: How much calories can you realistically burn? Your calorie burn is determined by your intensity and the duration. Your intensity will be low because you're careful not ...


2

A regular training program will eventually encounter head colds, bad sleep, and other curve balls of life. Do your warmups and make sure you have the mental wherewithal to handle your coordination and strength. Worst case scenario, get in there and do ~75% of your weight or something of the sort. Unless you have a real injury I'd just throttle back the ...


1

Here is a good article about biomechanical explanation of bench press with references at the end. To make the long story short; Grasp the barbell with an opposing thumb grip (thumbs wraps around the bar) with your hands shoulder-width or slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. An opposing thumb grip provides more security and control of the barbell. Grasp ...


1

You are putting yourself at a higher risk. There's always the chance for injury to happen whether you slept for 12 hours or none. What most likely will happen is that you'll feel tired sooner and won't be able to lift as much as you usually do.


1

Falling of the thread mill is not really a big deal unless of course you hit your head, but it could be just another fun video on youtube. The real problems arise if you keep pushing yourself too hard. Please, go see a doctor before doing intense exercises, it's all fun and games until something snaps and you think you are going to die. http://heartdisease....


1

I would do internal and external rotation exercises with a resistance band. For internal - Fix a band around a fixed point. Start side on to band. With arm closest to band, fix elbow into waist. Take hand/forearm across body and back, keeping elbow at 90 degrees. External rotation - again fix band. With arm furtherest from band. Start with elbow fixed ...


1

Besides the exercises recommended in the article you cite (planks, bridges, leg-lifts, bird-dogs and "stirring the pot"), full-body exercises that rely on your core muscles are also great ways to improve abdominal fitness, and they often strengthen your back at the same time, thereby helping prevent injury instead of potentially causing it. Some examples of ...


1

With regard to spinal disk safety during exercise, the critical factor is amount of impact rather than actual load (within reason). So doing static lifts will usually be less stressful than playing basketball or running for example. Having said that, maintaining good form during lifts is also critical especially when your back is involved. In my experience,...



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