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16

3x5 is 3 sets of 5 reps - it follows the same order as when you write or say it. Two examples from two well known strength coaches & programs: Starting Strength: Reduce the volume on Monday. Sometimes the Monday’s workout is too stressful. You need more time to recover. You can try: Dropping a work set or two (5x5 becomes 4x5 or ...


13

If you are looking to build mass, you should rest 45-60 seconds between sets of 8-12 repetitions for optimal gains. This timing builds optimal muscle mass and hypertrophy. If instead you are looking to improve your strength or endurance, you should be looking at a 3-4 minute break between sets. You'll want 4-6 repetitions with heavier resistance for ...


11

If you want size, you don't want to rest very long - perhaps under a minute between sets. Your goal in the gym is to get your muscles as fatigued as possible as quickly as possible (and then go home to eat!) I'm currently doing a hybrid workout to gain size (but I still want to work on strength a little, which is generally my long-term goal) and my workout ...


10

I'll answer this question in the context of a popular strength program (Starting Strength) that I happen to be doing. Why only a few exercises? Because as a novice, you don't need complicated training to make general strength gains. A well chosen, small set of full-body barbell movements trains you in almost every way you need to be strong as a human ...


7

Don't use soreness to plan sets The soreness part of your question is distracting you from the proper purpose of set selection. You don't choose sets to find a particular level of soreness, because after the first couple of workouts, soreness is not diagnostic of strength gains. What matters is your ability to recover and lift more in the subsequent ...


7

Based on this position statement from the American College of Sports Medicine, the answer to both questions is yes. According to the ACSM, sets of 15-25 reps (using light loads) are most effective for increasing muscular endurance, and have also been shown to increase strength in moderately trained people. High rep sets may also supplement a conventional ...


5

To summarize from a study published in the nlm.nih, lifting at a moderate tempo will allow you to lift more than you can at a slower tempo. This is very intuitive, as the slower you lift the more strength you exert and the sooner you will reach exhaustion. The study also concluded that there is no discernible difference in hormonal response for slow/fast ...


4

That depends on a lot of things. Basically, changing your grip from narrow to wide changes the level of involvement of the different muscles. Changing your grip might be good in that you can hit areas that aren't being targeted enough otherwise in your workout(s) or it could be not so good if you're removing the stress from a major area before it's fully ...


4

After starting with StrongLifts (5x5), then moving to Starting Strength (3x5), I also found I wanted to do more. It's common advice in the former two to just do the sets and go home, you don't have to kill yourself, be patient, strength will come, you'll stall soon enough... That didn't however ease the feeling of not making the most of a workout--I'd ...


4

The question is whether you can recover from the extra load during the rest period. If you can recover from the extra work, then that's great! You want to do the maximum amount of work that is recoverable. It is indeed a trial and error process to learn what you can recover from. I think developing that intuition is part of the sport of lifting, and it ...


3

How you organize your sets determines what you get out of them. Each exercise on its own: 5x5 curl, 5x5 press, 5x5 squat. Wait between sets. This is the most strength-oriented of the options. It will involve some hypertrophy and some token conditioning. Note, however, that squatting the same weight that you press and curl will not challenge your legs ...


3

As a complete beginner, there really isn't a huge reason not to. What it does is give you more practice, at the expense of energy. The time to back off and just do the 3x5 is when you feel run down before you start. This is how you adapt the load to what you can do right now. When 3x5 gets you run down all the time, it's time to switch things up and go ...


3

The Universe is an Uncaring Void I've seen sources say "3x5" (three sets of five) but denote their workouts as 100x5x3 (100 pounds, 5 reps, 3 sets). I've also seen sources say "3x5" and write 3x5 and mean three sets of five in both cases. There is no clear answer to your question. YxZ is fundamentally ambiguous. Show Your Units In physics, I was taught to ...


3

I found this article in Men's Health very interesting and have shaped my workouts on it over the last month or so. The page I linked to breaks down the reps/sets combinations for your different goals. I'm a flabby weakling, and am working on building strength just to get started. I'm doing 6 sets of 4 reps of a very few basic exercises at about 80%-90% max ...


3

I appreciate that you are new to lifting weights etc - but let me save you years of wasted workouts by blowing apart some common myths you have referred to. There is NOTHING you can do to control your body shape/physique OTHER than to loose/gain fat/muscle. There are no in-between activities like 'toning', 'shaping' or 'sculpting'. Pumping light weights ...


3

Your routine is scarily similar to mine. 12 repetitions sounds too much to me. In my case this would make me use less weight. Try to reduce this to 8 repetitions and increase 5-20 pounds the weight (gradually and according to your strength). In terms of protein, recall that the recommended "dose" is 2 grams per kilogram of bodyweight. For better results ...


2

When describing exercise routines, people are referring to sets per exercise. But flat and incline bench have enormous amounts of overlap, so doing sets of five for both will mean that you are almost certainly shorting one or both of them with regards to maximal weight, meaning you will build bigger muscles but get strong less quickly. Picking one or the ...


2

Number of Reps for a Novice As noted in my answer to your original question, I think sets of 5 or so are fine for a novice such as yourself. That is close enough to the strength end of the rep range spectrum, but is high enough to trigger some muscle growth (hypertrophy) in addition to the neurological improvements. Later, you can decide whether to switch ...


2

Sets are primarily a method of controlling volume. More volume means more training stimulus, which means a harder but hopefully more fruitful recovery period. I don't know of any relevance the total volume has to tendon health. A moderate weight done for 8 to 12 reps in a slow, controlled fashion is the important part for tendon health. I would increase the ...


2

Keeping your rep range between 8-12 will allow you muscles to reach hypertrophy (You can Google for many studies around this) and as soon as you can lift 12 you increase with the smallest amount possible. Always lift to positive failure and you will have tendons adjust to your new weights in no time. What is supposed to and what have been actually studied ...


1

You are right, for increasing muscle mass, training at intensity that allows you to perform 8-12 reps per set is reasonable. But note that it's not the number of repetitions per set that make the muscles grow, but the intensity of each repetition. If you are able to do more than 8-12 reps per set with a certain weight, the intensity of that weight has ...


1

"It's far better to make slow, steady increases in all your lifts for months than it is to make fast, unsustainable increases for weeks; do the math and you'll see the point. There will be plenty of time later for more exercises and more elaborate programming, but as long as simple works, complex is neither necessary nor desirable." - Rippetoe Personally, ...


1

Short answer: 8-12 reps, whichever your goal may be (strength, mass, speed, etc). Long answer: This has actually been rather well studied in science. 8-12 reps is the ideal range for a beginner, no matter what your goal is. You can see a (rather lengthy) post I wrote about this here, or just go to my source, the 2009 position stand by the American College ...


1

If your main focus to primarily to gain strength, I would highly recommend you to consider a starting strength 5x5 program. There are different variations of 5x5 programs, but they basically focus on compound exercises through squatting, benching, and barbell row/cleans. There's some extensive wikis on Mark Ripptoe, Bill Starr, and Madcow programs; however, ...


1

If the amount you have been able to lift over time has been going down, and you're interested in muscle gain for aesthetics, I think you should do one of two things: Switch to a novice 3x5 program like Starting Strength or StrongLifts, in order to get bigger and stronger. Once you feel you are big enough, you can cut weight with cardio and dieting, or ...


1

Useful is a very relative term in relation to working out. Varying your grip between sets will change the order in which muscles are activated in order to complete the exercise. For an example, see the article on BodyBuilding.com about the various chin-up grips and their varying strengths and weaknesses. Changing the pathway you follow to achieve a full ...



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