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10

It's a deadlift, meaning the weight should be dead on the floor. Touch-and-go or otherwise bouncing around is not a deadlift. Personally, I relax my grip and reset on every rep. My hands don't come off the bar, but I open my fingers, ensuring that the weight is indeed dead on the floor. The extra second this adds to each set is negligible and the benefit ...


4

First, let me correct your understanding of hypertrophy: You get bigger by more fatigue inducing reps (see this article for more info) There's nothing inspired or sacred about rep ranges or even set targets. They are just tools (see this article for more info) Second, you need to understand the concept of fatigue. The articles I linked to above are ...


4

John's answer is correct - all in all, it's hypertrophy (TUT) vs strength (rest). I just wanna add that it's a matter of how long the stoppage lasts, and not the reason that made you stop (as long as you're remaining in the starting position). e.g. resetting your grip is equal to stopping for a breath. There is no definition for how long the bar should lay ...


3

Yes, depending on your goals Resetting your grip likely takes a bit of time, perhaps a few seconds, perhaps 10 or more. During this time, your hamstrings are (mostly) resting. This changes the results of the exercise somewhat. From a hypertrophy standpoint, the more you are 'resting' between reps, the more you're losing a bit of Time-Under-Tension, which ...


2

Anything that allows you to put in more overall fatigue inducing volume will be good. If you can do the first set at 12 reps, you have a few options: Do 3 sets at whatever you can get, and focus on building up even one more rep each time you do the exercise until you have the full set/reps Reduce weight for each set and use the last set to get as many as ...


1

(This answer is according to your goal, hypertrophy) Reaching failure shouldn't be your goal. According to a few articles I read (a very good one can be found here), training constantly to failure may hinder your results. I have two main rules in this topic (both also appear in the article): Set weight that lets you reach failure only on the last set of ...


1

It's quite common to have too short rest periods between sets, so increasing it will lower the effect you are noticing. The effect won't vanish however, I would suggest that you set your goal like 10 reps, 8 reps, 6 reps (3 sets), that way, you will challenge yourself in every set instead of just the last ones. In exercises where you are able to decrease ...


1

Do I need to change the routine? No. So long you are able to progress in weights / reps / sets, you do not need to change your routine. With that said, this is called progressive overload. So long you are progressing, your workout is pretty much effective for you. You are doing pretty well except for your 3rd week. So what you could do is continue doing 70 ...


1

This would be what some call a "giant" super set. Usually a super set is 2 moves, but I have done giant super sets up to 4 moves (usually 1 or 2 of the moves being body weight moves though). I use supersets almost exclusively when I workout. You can do antagonist muscles as mentioned before, but you can also do the same muscle group. For arms I always ...


1

From the research that I have read, the length of your break has no influence on hypertrophy. The best indicator of hypertrophy is either volume, as in tonnage (sets times reps times weight) increasing over time, or more recently the number of "hard" sets per workout, meaning the number of sets which leave you close to technical failure (not at failure or ...



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