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10

It's a deadlift, meaning the weight should be dead on the floor. Touch-and-go or otherwise bouncing around is not a deadlift. Personally, I relax my grip and reset on every rep. My hands don't come off the bar, but I open my fingers, ensuring that the weight is indeed dead on the floor. The extra second this adds to each set is negligible and the benefit ...


6

The number of sets you do increases what we call the total volume of work being done. The more volume of work you do, the stronger signal your body gets that it needs to grow. If you do only one set, you aren't giving your body a very strong signal to grow. If the set is heavier than last time (even if you push it to failure), you give a slightly stronger ...


4

First, let me correct your understanding of hypertrophy: You get bigger by more fatigue inducing reps (see this article for more info) There's nothing inspired or sacred about rep ranges or even set targets. They are just tools (see this article for more info) Second, you need to understand the concept of fatigue. The articles I linked to above are ...


4

John's answer is correct - all in all, it's hypertrophy (TUT) vs strength (rest). I just wanna add that it's a matter of how long the stoppage lasts, and not the reason that made you stop (as long as you're remaining in the starting position). e.g. resetting your grip is equal to stopping for a breath. There is no definition for how long the bar should lay ...


3

Yes, depending on your goals Resetting your grip likely takes a bit of time, perhaps a few seconds, perhaps 10 or more. During this time, your hamstrings are (mostly) resting. This changes the results of the exercise somewhat. From a hypertrophy standpoint, the more you are 'resting' between reps, the more you're losing a bit of Time-Under-Tension, which ...


3

so 108 sun salutations.One Suryanamaskar contains 12 asanas that complete one cycle, so one cycle per each leg (Right & left) complete one round. So 54 sets of this round will give 108 Sun salutations. Good luck.


2

Anything that allows you to put in more overall fatigue inducing volume will be good. If you can do the first set at 12 reps, you have a few options: Do 3 sets at whatever you can get, and focus on building up even one more rep each time you do the exercise until you have the full set/reps Reduce weight for each set and use the last set to get as many as ...


2

The way I do it is not the hatha sin salutation that is all one but the Right and then only the Left. I do the Ashtanga vinyasa suryanamaskara A, which is only one. And I do the 108. I have heard some people do 54 suryanamaskara A and 54 suryanamaskara B.


1

(This answer is according to your goal, hypertrophy) Reaching failure shouldn't be your goal. According to a few articles I read (a very good one can be found here), training constantly to failure may hinder your results. I have two main rules in this topic (both also appear in the article): Set weight that lets you reach failure only on the last set of ...


1

This would be what some call a "giant" super set. Usually a super set is 2 moves, but I have done giant super sets up to 4 moves (usually 1 or 2 of the moves being body weight moves though). I use supersets almost exclusively when I workout. You can do antagonist muscles as mentioned before, but you can also do the same muscle group. For arms I always ...


1

From the research that I have read, the length of your break has no influence on hypertrophy. The best indicator of hypertrophy is either volume, as in tonnage (sets times reps times weight) increasing over time, or more recently the number of "hard" sets per workout, meaning the number of sets which leave you close to technical failure (not at failure or ...



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