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21

When doing any weight training that involves the legs/feet, you want a shoe that provides: Hard, incompressible sole. Avoid squishy sneakers, as they are a bit like doing push-ups on a mattress. Wide & stable. You don't want to be wobbly. Specific cases: Any type of squatting (including the clean, jerk, snatch): a raised heel is advantagous when ...


8

If they're not causing injuries then they're absolutely fine. If all you're doing is walking a few kms (and the distance is much less than what you're running) then they're perfectly fine. If they start wearing so much that they change your walking style or you start getting symptoms of injuries (such as shin pain) then I would chuck them.


7

For sure, in my opinion there are two factors: 1. COMPEED ! You're gonna need Compeed brand blister covers. They come in a small blue plastic pack. There is almost nothing that will help once you do have a blister. I have tried everything, home-remedies to high-tech. If you do have a blister, and you must keep playing, your best bet is to use a Compeed ...


7

I'm all for the minimalist shoe movement. I wear Merrell Trail Gloves almost exclusively, including at my standing desk at work. However, there is something to be said for using the right tool for the job, and for biking VFFs are not the right tool for the job. That's not to say you can't wear them, especially if you have cage or platform pedals on your ...


7

You can... But in my experience, it's better to use that 7th eyelet slightly differently to prevent heel slipping. It is shown in this video starting around 1:47: To the video Steps (images from Health on the Run): Create a loop using the last two eyelets. Put the shoelace through the hole on the opposite side. Put on the shoe and pull the laces tight ...


6

You may not be lifting heavy weights just yet, but by the time you exhaust the gains from Starting Strength, you will be. The biggest thing you have to realize about dedicated lifting shoes is that what makes a good lifting shoe is terrible for the other things you want to do. They have opposing goals. Lifting Shoe Requirements: Stiff, solid heel with ...


5

To some degree I think the shoe needs will vary based on individual anatomy and flexibility. For me (43yr old male with 2yrs of heavy lifting, 6 months olympic weightlifting) a taller and stiffer heel was needed to deal with my ankle flexibility issues. Without the higher heel I tended to end up with my weight to far forward onto my toes rather than heels ...


5

I had a period of serious shoe funk, and tried a number techniques before finding a system that works for me. It should be noted that shoe odor tends to be much worse in synthetic shoes. The most important thing is prevention. Do not put your shoes in a bag, ever. Even in an open canvas bag, the shoes don't dry out as well between sessions. I've taken to ...


4

You'll give up support, but otherwise Vibram Five Fingers fit the bill. If you use them for running, start with very short distances, like 100m. There are some muscles in your legs and feet that most likely will be very sore after the first few uses. The downside of vibrams is mostly found in the lack of protection when dropping a weight on your foot. By ...


4

No - tennis shoes are going to be slightly heavier and have more material/cushioning around the sides. They are meant for stability and lots of side to side movement. Running shoes are lighter and are built for forward movement. You will experience aches of all kinds of you do jogging/running in tennis shoes at any amount of frequency more than about a ...


4

Sarge has a point that if they aren't causing injuries, then it might be fine to wear them. But while the forces when walking compared to running are much lower, you typically wear the shoes much longer (10-14 hours/day vs 0.5-1 hour/day). The reason you replace running shoes is often because the midsole (and probably outersole) are permanently damaged. ...


4

The best thing you could probably do would be to find a dedicated runner's shop. We've got one where I live and they are really specializing in running shoes. A good runner's shop should be able to do several things for you: There should be trained employees, who are themselves runners (or do sports at least) and know what they do. They can assess your ...


4

You might want to read this page on how to select a running shoe. Sounds like you underpronate your walk. That is you walk slightly outward on your foot with each step. From the chart on the page you might want to try a neutral type of shoe. Underpronation/Supination: The two terms "underpronation" and "supination" can be used interchangeably to ...


3

Outdoor Gear Lab wrote a pretty good article on the subject here: http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Climbing-Shoe-Reviews/Buying-Advice Quoting from this article: If you are just starting out then you probably want a more comfortable, versatile, all-around shoe. Don't go for the aggressive down-turned shoes. Go for something that is not too tight and ...


3

Usually Cross Trainer Shoes are overall best, except for Jogging, since they are designed with enough support and cushion. It is not a difficult task to buy training shoes, but finding the best cross training shoes is a challenge. These shoes are versatile, comfortable, cushioning and provide the basic support, stability and durability required for ...


3

Oh good lord - don't try it in boots - you definitely will break an ankle. @alord1689's answer is pretty good. I would expand on it and say: Get some trail shoes. These have several benefits over road shoes or hiking boots: The heel is lower than a road shoe so the risk of tipping over and spraining an ankle or breaking a bone is less. They have a stone ...


3

There are a lot of things you can do to increase the shelf life of your rock climbing shoes as well as reduce the odor/bacteria in it: Do not wear them except while climbing; the rubber grips at the bottom soak up the dirt and gravel, reducing their effectiveness and long-term durability. Replace the soles of the shoes on an as-needed basis. Use a damp rag ...


3

I'm also a bicycle commuter whose feet tend to sweat a fair amount, especially when I'm active. This caused both strong foot odor and recurring athlete's foot. What's worked best for me: Shoes with plenty of ventilation. Merino wool socks. Shoes have typically been "running" sneakers which have synthetic leather with plenty of mesh bits, and some ...


3

My guess is they don't quite fit. You might need a slightly bigger shoe, most places recommend a half size larger as your feet tend to swell(which is probably why it hurt after 20 mins). The other general recommendation is to have about a thumbs width between big toe and top of shoe (NYTimes, 2010). If your store has a generous return policy(as you ...


2

Although flat-soled shoes are traditional for weightlifting, I really like Vibrams for this. Of course there is the strengthening component that everyone talks about, but the real bonus is the extra stability and "grip" you get on the ground when doing deadlifts, squats, etc. I even notice a difference when doing bench press (yes your feet should be ...


2

Uh, no, they aren't worth your ROI. The main purposes I see in Vibram Shoes is to strengthen the supporting lower leg muscles and to change your running gait to put you more on your toes. Vibram shoes are training tools within themselves. The shoes should be worn progressively similarly to how you would progress a workout -> maybe 10 minutes a day ...


2

I've tried wushu shoes, 5-Fingers, barefoot, and weightlifting shoes. Barefoot was the overall best for workouts. Weightlifting shoes, while expensive, will definitely help you add to your max lift, although I don't know if they help you become stronger.


2

"Barefoot running" shoes offer little protection, and are only recommended for advanced runners with good technique -- for the average runner they are no good choices. Since running is very high impact, you need to protect your knees and joints, thus the recommended shoes are running shoes with air cells or other padding that can reduce the impact on your ...


2

Personally, I have no opinion on the subject of whether you should wear cycling-specific shoes or not; however, I will say that you are not going to get less efficient power-transfer from not wearing clipless pedals. It's simple physics. The energy is conserved -- it necessarily HAS to go into turning the crank. A very VERY small amount may turn into ...


2

You are referring to Track and Field shoes, also known as Running Spikes. This will help in your searches online for the shoes. The running spikes are commonly made with metal spikes, as opposed to soccer shoes (or football as the rest of the world calls it) which tend to be rubber. Running spikes are intended for short distance running, particularly ...


2

Here are my three recommendations: Try to avoid the heelstrike. You get less traction than using your whole foot and are likely to fall on your bum. Slow down and use shorter strides to maintain control. Find some hybrid hiking/running shoes, such as the hi-top lines available from Inov-8.


2

You might like Altras. http://www.altrazerodrop.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_-1_15151_18952_69005_176939 First off, they're made on a completely different, more foot-shaped last. So your toes have plenty of room. Second, while they're "zero-drop", meaning there is no lift at the heel, they do have a comfortable amount of cushioning, and they're ...


2

Coming from my own personal experience and research on running and walking I would suggest the following. If your only going to be walking, traditional running shoes are fine. They promote landing on your heal and push through to your forefoot which is good walking form. If your are going to be running, I suggest getting a minimalist style running shoe. ...


2

I had to check exactly what "plyometrics workout" means - I assume you mean things like box jumps, precision jumps, jumping lunges, etc. I have done these both with and without shoes, but the past few years I prefer without. As you've mentioned in the question, there are reasons against doing this. You will feel more impact on your feet, and less ...


2

The weightlifting shoes have a solid sole, so they're much better than any regular sports shoe you'd wear with a cushioned sole, but yes, the raised heel will be a problem (just like putting a board or plate under your heel for a lift). You're better off lifting in Vivo Barefoots or Vibram FiveFingers (in the case of the former you'll want to take the insole ...



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