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Yes, upright rows are one of the most dangerous exercises for your shoulders, along with wide grip pull ups, behind the head pulldowns, etc. I would highly recommend not doing them. They can even hurt your shoulders to a point where they suffer from permanent damage, or to where you need surgery. If you want to strengthen your delts and traps, I'd suggest ...


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It's likely all the bench-pressing that you're doing. Too much volume: 10x10 is a very high-volume program. Most lifters stick to around 3x10 or 4x8 for hypertrophy. It also might be a muscle imbalance. Your pectorals are stronger than your back-muscles, and it's screwing with the (very complicated) structures in your shoulders. Take a break from ...


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You could probably achieve them by doing machine shoulder press, dumbbell shoulder press, barbell military press, side lateral raises, front raises, and decline flies 3 times a week for 2 years to really get them with a "cannonball" appearance.


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If you are doing it in proper form, it'll build your middle back, lower back, glutes, legs and it'll also help strength the sides of the abs. Your shoulders and traps should see almost no change. You do get your traps sore because of all the weight that is resting on top of them but you are not putting them under tension. If you want to build your ...


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Your primary concern here is obviously to identify the cause of your pain. To investigate this, you will need to use exercises which are broadly similar to the military press, compare which of them cause pain, and use these as a basis from which to locate the issue. For instance, in this video by Jeff Cavaliere, he uses barbells, dumbbells, and cables to ...


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Hard to say anything definite without seeing a video or pictures but I'm thinking it could be a combination of a weak core and faulty technique. Try doing the plank and back raises, without and with added weight, and see how it feels. Does it hurt similarly? As for diagnosing your form: look in a mirror to see the curvature of your back, as you're ...


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I like standing diagonally, because you have balance in all directions, you won't have to compensate with the curvature of your back as much to avoid falling over. Also, keep your core tight while pressing.


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Already been said but: 1-8 Reps Strength Training 9-12 Reps Hypertrophy Training <--- You want to be here... 12-15 Reps Stamina Training` Basically any kind of progression weight-wise using a hypertrophy rep range will gradually develop your shoulders to how you want them. Shouldn't really have to do this for you (Should use your initiative) ...


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If you're doing this, stop it immediately. You WILL hurt yourself. Muscle gains are made by doing movements with physical resistance (weights). We need to break down the muscle fibers through intense exertion, and then our nutrition and rest make sure they're built back up, stronger and bigger. Arm circles have no resistance besides air resistance, and the ...


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NO. You need a lot more resistance to grow your delts, the kind of resistance that won't allow you to do 60k reps, or even 60.


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Building any body part to its full potential without abusing steroids is hard work. Unless you’re genetically gifted, you’ve got to be willing to work at it for a long time. Unlike a steroid abuser, a natural training athlete must optimize all aspects of diet, training, sleep, and nutrition. And, let’s not forget genetics, a factor you have no control ...


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You can build some with a lot of exercise but definitely not like the ones by steroid users, there's a natural limit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0al_ukv47c0 http://www.builtlean.com/2011/03/30/how-much-muscle-can-you-gain-naturally/


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Yes, by all means. When you do bicep curls, your primary goal is to stress your biceps, and as few other muscles as possible. Find a position and trajectory in which you only put stress on your biceps, so that your deltas are involved very mildly, merely to keep your arm position steady, not to help it pull the weight. It is impossible to avoid using the ...


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The general principle is that if you are looking to maximize your muscle mass, you work the larger muscles more than the smaller ones (i.e. more fatigue inducing reps). That means you would work your triceps more than your biceps, your quads and glutes more than your hamstrings, etc. You would also work your back and your general core more than everything ...


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There is no reason to train them more often, because as Mårten says, the fact that your legs are bigger, ensures that you use more weight, thus training them more. How often you train them depends entirely on your goals. For instance, a general worker-outer like me will do a split, and just rotate the days. But if you take a person who is actively looking ...


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Well, they already are. If you compare leg press with bench press, you'll probably leg press about 3 times as much weight as you bench. So the proportionality to muscle size is already there. Adding more reps or sets to your legs would be out of proportion.



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