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16

Speaking specifically to push-ups: They don't require any equipment They are fairly effective They exercise a wide range of muscles (chest, triceps, shoulders, abs) They can be easily modified depending on fitness level and target muscle(s) They are easy to learn They are pretty safe It's easy to track progress (I could do 25 push-ups last week, this week ...


12

Simply: No they're not With ab exercises you train your muscles, the body takes it's energy from every source it got, no matter where it's needed. So you can't specifically burn fat at a particular bodypart. But as you want to reduce your belly fat, why not also define some nice muscles beneath it... It's absolutely true that you cannot burn fat at a ...


11

The History of Keeping Women from Exercising A friend of mine was told she couldn't train judo because it would somehow harm her reproductive organs. (At no time was she asked whether this mattered to her.) We know that even as recently as the 1970s, women were barred from marathons on similar grounds: I'm sure many physicians trained in that era are ...


8

Adopt a combination of HIIT and strength training. Don't run 8km every day, it's completely useless and simply wears out your body for no good reason. You need to get your testosterone up to build muscle and reduce fat. I don't know if you're male or female, but it doesn't matter. The only way to do that is with exercise of very high intensity. Avoid ...


7

If you're totally un- or de-trained, you might run into trouble recovering between sessions. That might happen anyway, particularly if you don't sleep or eat enough. But I bet it'll work fine. These programs, however, are not well-regarded due to their focus on strengthening one movement while ignoring its opposite. You do a lot of pushing and a lot of ab ...


7

Abs can be sufficiently trained via isometric exercise. I believe the safest way to exercise the abdominals is to use them for their intended function (stabilization) under a progressively increasing load or difficulty. For example: The co-contraction of the abdominals with the spinal erectors that is required during heavy squats and deadlifts in order to ...


6

The rectus abdominus works to curl the torso, and bring the lower part of the ribcage forward and down. It is one muscle, and as such, any exercise that curls the body works the entire muscle. The "upper and lower" abdominal belief is pretty much a myth. Whether you curl down towards your legs or up towards your head, the entire muscle is contracting. The ...


6

@Aardvark's answer is excellent, and I'd like to add one more to his list... Everyone already knows about them Compare this with the burpee, which is also an easy to learn, safe, effective, easily modified, easily tracked, equipment-less workout, but much less widespread.


5

Yes there are muscles between your ribs. They're called the intercostal muscles, though "soreness in ribs" might also be caused by soreness in your pectoralis minor (which connects to the front of the rib cage) or your serratus anterior (which connect your back to the side of your rib cage). A good hint that it's muscle soreness instead of connective tissue ...


4

You are probably weak. Strength training is the solution. The best option would be to learn to lift weights. Starting Strength, a 3-times-a-week barbell program, is a good option. StrongLifts 5x5 is also commonly recommended. (See this question.) If you can't get access to a gym or barbell, you could look into bodyweight strength training instead. These ...


4

I highly agree with the strength training responses. I'll also add here that strength training (squats, overhead press, pull ups, etc.) also works out your core a lot, since you need to engage your core to stabilize your body during many of the exercises. You also mention that you run 8k every morning and do burpees afterward. I think you should read this ...


3

What should I be focusing on when doing a situp? The primary thing you should focus on is contracting (tightening) your abdominals as you bring your chest to your knees. Are there ways to reduce strain on muscle groups that should not be getting strained? I never do the traditional sit-up anymore because it puts so much strain on other areas, and ...


3

It's hard for me to believe after running daily and doing a bunch of burpees, that your core is actually weak. And at 6'1" and 165 lbs, you are also not at all overweight. My guess is that at best you need to stand up straight and all of your belly fat problems will be solved. At worst, you are expressing negative body image issues that don't reflect your ...


3

Apparently sit-ups (and other exercises that create pressure in the lower body) can cause problems with the pelvic floor, including promoting pelvic floor weakening, with the most extreme form of that being uterus prolapse, where the uterus is pushed down into the vagina. However, from what I've found, this is not a concern for all women, but specifically ...


3

I've read about exercise inducing amenorrhea. ...exercise-induced amenorrhea is a temporary condition that occurs when the energy demands of strenuous exercise cause your body to go into "starvation mode" and shut down unnecessary functions, including ovulation, to keep your basic life functions going. Another resource suggests that exercise in ...


3

I'm going to assume by "ab exercises" you mean things like crunches, sit ups, leglifts, etc. Things that isolate the abs. Ab exercises do very little to help you burn fat, because they are essentially using 1 muscle group (abdominals). Ab exercises, when done properly, can help strengthen your core, which provides benefits across the board. However, many ...


3

The short answer? Keep doing it! The idea of these programs are to get you to a point where you can do all these push ups and sit ups. Same with the Couch-to-5k/10k programs. Building up your stamina and your strength sensibly is only part of the battle. The remainder is to keep it up. Now, I don't know about you, but the idea of doing a bunch of push ...


2

This goes for almost every place people gather fat. YOU CANNOT SPOT REDUCE. Almost no amount of crunches or "ab exercises" are going to make your abs look better if you don't have the fat loss to back it up. You WILL make your abs stronger, but if you don't shed the fat with a complete exercise and diet plan you will never see all of the hard work you are ...


2

You are getting older and need to augment your muscle mass to compensate for a slowing metabolism and/or extra weight carried from your youth. The body will adapt too well to any routine, and you've already hit a plateau with your cardio burpee routine. Focus on building some lean mass, which means you need some strength training (lift weights). ...


2

Yes, situps are incredibly harmful. Why? Dr. Stuart McGill said so. Why is that important... Stuart McGill is a respected academic on spinal mechanics, and most definitely not a chiropractor! If you look at that his profile which you linked, he is the Director of the University of Waterloo's Spine Biomechanics Laboratory. The paper you mentioned is ...


2

Crunches won't destroy your spine, situps will. This isn't hearsay or 'broscience', this is based on the extensive research of Dr. Stuart McGill who has made his living studying abdominal movements from the frail to elite sports people. Situps require an unnatural flexing of the spine under tension that dramatically increases the risk of spinal damage. ...


2

Crunches overdevelop the top 4 ( or crown ) of your 8 pack abdominal muscles, unless you are compensating by doing a lot of lower abdominal exercises. A sit up is also not the best abdominal exercise for core strength. Try V-Ups, Jack knifes, Leg Raises, Weighted Planks, Front Levers, etc.


1

Given that Dr. McGills complaints are around the spinal compression during a situp or crunch, given the similary of the movement I say a lot of the risks carry across to the Abmat situp. For example, consider the below image taken from the AbMat Situp page: You can see it encourages a forward flex of the abdominals to force the body up, and while the ...


1

Short term programs and diets often lead you back to where you were - or worse. I would recommend finding a sport/activity that you would be interested in long term and setting your goals to be good at that (golf, volleyball, swimming, hiking, etc.). You can alternatively focus on the results you're seeing/feeling now and imagine what it would be to ...



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