Hot answers tagged

10

Definitely think you can go sub 25 minutes. The key with running is "Accumulated fitness". The more often you run and the more consistently (say 4 days a week for an entire year), the better you will become. So how do you get there? 1) Run often - minimum 4 days a week but slowly see if you can fit 5 or even 6 days a week into your schedule 2) Run ...


7

Yeah you should rarely, if ever, plan on adding more than 10% in either distance or speed per week as a general rule. More to the point of your question is whether you want to increase aerobic speed (how fast can you run 10k) or burst speed (how fast can you run < 1k). If the latter, then yes, bodyweight exercises like squats, one-legged squats, box ...


6

Realistic is very subjective, but I think that the numbers of the German Sports Badge could count as realistic, as they are considered to be achievable by every more or less avid athlete. For a 5k run the numbers are: 18-29 30-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 men: 23:00 25:30 28:00 30:30 33:00 35:30* *) this activity is not recommended for ...


6

To summarize from a study published in the nlm.nih, lifting at a moderate tempo will allow you to lift more than you can at a slower tempo. This is very intuitive, as the slower you lift the more strength you exert and the sooner you will reach exhaustion. The study also concluded that there is no discernible difference in hormonal response for slow/fast ...


6

With the exception of a track event, most everything else will have hills. I've heard hill repeats referred to as "speed work in disguise". What they have in common is rather than the steady-state output you can build up on the flats, you need the ability to generate a lot more output, and then recover quickly back to your steady-state maintainable race ...


5

First of all, you should switch to referring to different pace units. Try min/km or min/mile. In the running world speed in km/h is nearly meaningless, as you'll hardly encounter these units. Now, if you want to meet your goal, you should look for a training plan that will take you to your end goal over several weeks. Such training plan should have a ...


5

If you want to win a 5k, walking is a great start, but will probably not get you there on its own. Fast walking will help you build a strong base level of aerobic fitness. Your heart and lungs will develop and improve your capacity for running. After you build this base, your cardiovascular system needs to learn to function efficiently as you approach (or ...


5

Nowadays, most training plans for Marathons, includes both lots of LSR and later a fair bit of speed work. The common idea is to first build up your ability to run long distances on fat and later add speed. As the first part will inevitably slow you pace a bit over time, the later part is needed to get the speed back into the run. E.g. the first 8-12 ...


5

Basic speed workouts have these benefits: Fast twitch muscle fiber recruitment: speed work is one of the only ways to recruit fast twitch muscle fibers. If you do sprint training, your body will learn how to recruit those muscle fibers for faster running in workouts and when finishing races. Puts a large amount of stress on the central nervous system: by ...


4

Shuttle runs, short wind sprints, lateral shuffle sprints are good exercises. For short burst speed, you need to practice short burst speed. Work into it though, simply going out one day and hammering a bunch of shuttle runs is a good way to pull muscles. The more you do it, the faster you will be. Also practice form drills, such as high knees and butt ...


4

Anderson Silva, who is what one could conservatively call one of the most successful counter-punchers in modern mixed martial arts, includes two elements in his training that I would say are vital to that success: Copious sparring, focusing on technique and defense Dodging a racquetball thrown at his head Other than footwork drills for agility, ...


4

Concept 2 actually have a page that may help you. Some of the better times are around the 33 -34 minute mark. The page is dynamically generated depending upon criteria you enter. Below I've selected a few men age 19-29 heavyweight (>75Kg) world ranking for Concept 2 Rowing: 1 Eric Murray 29 Cambridge, New Zealand NZL 31:17.2 IND_V D 2 ...


4

It would likely be dependent upon your machine but I did find this. Elliptical machines calculate average speed based on thousands of readings taken throughout your workout. Most machines measure your speed every few seconds and record the information in the elliptical's computer. Average speed is typically available in real time and as a final ...


4

Specifically for speed, plyometric jumps onto something are good (start low and get higher), and doing your 40 yard sprints dragging something like a tire or a weighted sled; that will get your acceleration going. For stamina, probably intervals. Get a round timer for your phone, that way you can listen to music, and get the timer signal as you run. Going ...


4

As far as I know, the fastest movements and possibly the biggest acceleration are due to eye saccades, that is rapid movements of the eye as it scans the environment. Those are involuntary and have to do with perception. Wikipedia quotes the speed at 900 degrees/second (2.5 revolutions, for comparison with ADAM). As for acceleration, "Unsupervised ...


4

A standard go-to for improving speed is wind sprints. Basically, you repeatedly go from 0 to as fast as you can and sustain it for a short distance, recover for a few minutes, then repeat. It develops explosive power and, if you have an external starting signal like a friend with a whistle, it helps you develop reflexes so that you start moving as soon as ...


3

According to multiple sources a good estimate is about 2 seconds per pound per mile (This is something around 2.7 seconds per kg per km). Note that it is not a linear formula, there is a point where losing more weight will result in loss in muscle mass, which is likely going to hinder performance. Unfortunately I couldn't find any scholarly research on this ...


3

Basic running concepts are as follows: Certain running intensities cause certain adaptions within your body (VO2max, lactate threshold, etc). Therefore, when training, runners often either Run at a constant pace/intensity Run at a constant pace/intensity with breaks in between, known as interval training (used for high intensities that can't be maintained ...


3

Unfamiliar exercises are harder than familiar exercises. The 8x400 zonked you because you're used to 20k runs. A sprinter used to 8x400 would be zonked after a 20k run. Things we're not good at or that we don't do are more exhausting.


3

Exercises that require increased cardiovascular activity should all help improve stamina, and exercises that require explosive muscle movements should all help improve power, acceleration and speed. For instance, swimming is a great total-body exercise that can improve both. It's worthwhile to note, however, that other exercises probably can't help you ...


3

Besides plyometric and dragging, I would also work on reaction speed exercises. For example, lay on the ground, wait for a signal, get up and sprint shorter distances. The reason is that your goal is to use the sprint in a team sport context where reaction speed is important. Typical reaction & sprint drills from basketball (where the distance is ...


3

No. If your fastest pace for 1 mile is 5.30. Unfortunately the further you go the pace will drop off. There's various websites that will predict your race times based on other distances, ie I guess it works out your potential. Here's one http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/4/4_1/96.shtml You can help reduce the drop of pace by interval training and a long run ...


2

It's a bit difficult to give you a time to aim for if you are alternating between 500 hard / 500 easy. Work up to sustaining consistent effort over 10,000m on a setting 4 (good for giving you a reasonable feeling of what rowing actually is) and with your background anything under 40mins is solid. When my team train we target 1:40min/500m hard then ...


2

i ve been building up my pace for 6 months, i started at 34 mins for 5k. i am 39 and weighed 217lb when i started. I read a lot of stuff from the web,(there is loads of it) took on board what i thought was relevant and now i can run it in 25 mins and weigh 185lbs. The most improtant thing is to keep it up, you don t want to be trying to do your best run ...


2

It's always nice to see people getting into running :) I personally run my 5k's around 15-17mins. However, I think that time really doesn't matter, it matters whether or not you pushed yourself. I vomit after every race, but I always feel good, physically as well as mentally because I know that I did my best. Don't worry what your time is, just do your ...


2

You can find a deep-level answer to your question by studying D.T. Suzuki's book Zen in Japanese Culture and he goes even deeper in his essay in Zen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis (by Fromm, Suzuki, and De Martino). The picture is filled out by Eugen Herrigel in Zen in the Art of Archery. Thinking to ourselves in words gets in the way of responses that have ...


2

Given that you seem to be very experienced in the field, i.e. know all the technical aspects of the situations back and forth, and assuming that you are fit, it might make sense to focus on meditation. Over time, meditation can help you with of seeing the situation as it really is and that might be better for reaction speed and timing than basing the ...


2

(This is lifted from another answer I gave, so it may get flagged; I'm okay with that.) Here's a quick list. Sled/tire pulls and/or chute runs (also improves stride length). If you don't have equipment, have a partner apply resistance throughout the run. Skips (aiming for either vertical or horizontal max) Falling starts (lean forward until you lose your ...


2

If you are looking for ways to increase your speed at a given distance, I would suggest running over distance. We raced 5k, so we ran anywhere from 1.5x to 4x that distance. If that is a problem for you (because of injuries or whatnot), look into other forms of cardio that are lower impact. Cycling, swimming, rowing come to mind. Keep in mind the injury ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible