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5

There is a very useful analysis of a selection of multiple studies to be found here: http://www.strengthandconditioningresearch.com/exercises/squat/ I'll start out by assuming that you adjust your feet angle to your stance width (or vice-versa) to keep the femurs and tibias in the same plane as the line from mid-heel to mid-toe. I know this isn't exactly ...


2

As others have mentioned it increases IAP. An effect of it is that it may also allow your core muscles to fire harder by giving your CNS a reason to reduce limits on certain muscles. It probably isn't cheating I disagree with the apparently common belief that wearing a belt will reduce the opportunity for the lower back to get stronger. Numerous studies ...


2

Two major issues for me were core and flexibility in my Lats. I would say that you should focus on more core work which have a variety of different exercises that can help. First I would foam roll lats before attempting any front squats. Not sure what you're currently doing, but a huge reason why my front squat was lagging so much. Usually as I got the ...


1

In your specific situation, I would suggest to go with the latter, 3x5 routine or even consider 5x5 depending on your ability. There is a lot to be said for doing splits but in your case, because of the weight being lifted and the goal of wanting to lift more that you focus on doing the lift in a consistent way with progressive overload. I would also ...


1

Previous answers all missed a crucial aspect... the belt works by allowing you brace your abdominals against it. It doesn't "support" the back. It allows YOU to better support your midline/trunk/core/fad-name-for-that-area more effectively. Generally, you should do as much work as you can without the belt (get used to generating that intra-abdominal force ...



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