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11

The underlying basic principle to exercise is the concept that in order to force your body to get stronger, you have to demand more from your body than you have in the past. This same principle is at work whether you are a beginner or very advanced. When the body adapts to the increased demands, it does so with a little room to spare. This is called ...


9

Starting from the bottom position is quite differen from 'normal' squats, as you're not using the stretch-shortening cycle. This means your muscles and tendons are not already pre-loaded when you're going up, which will result in the getting up being much harder than it normally would be. The main benefit of starting from the bottom position is that you'll ...


6

You can try Smolov method for squating How Smolov Works The Russian Smolov Squat routine is split into 3 phases for a total of 13 weeks. As always, start with a weight you're 100% sure you can Squat instead of starting too heavy and hitting plateaus. The 4 Smolov cycles. Weeks 1-2 - introduction cycle to prepare your legs. Week 1 you Squat 3 day in a row ...


4

The reason why people recommend that you do not workout the same muscle group 2 days in a row is to lower the risk of you damaging your muscles whilst they are rebuilding and strengthening from your training. Having said this... this is a recommendation not a rule. Therefore, workouts such as your Smolov squat program are perfectly okay to attempt baring ...


4

What's going to happen with front squats is that your upper back and quads will get stronger when compared to a back squat (high or low bar). That is due to the slightly different leverages involved with the lift. 225 lb front squats are really good. As to spine compression, consider the following: The musculature you build up braces your spine in ...


4

I'm not sure what the rest of your workout looked like, and how close you were to your 1RM max, and those matter. 90 kilos doesn't mean much, since that might be 80% or 40% of your max, which is much more relevant. Either way, 10 sets of 10 reps is a lot of volume. That's 100 weighted squats, whereby most programs that are volume heavy will come in around ...


4

If your goal is to make your legs strong, then squats are without a doubt the best exercise you can do to achieve that goal. Squats are a universal exercise that both men and women can do with equivalent results and success, so there is no reason to be worried about results depending on your gender. Now, any exercise is better than none, so it's good that ...


3

Have you considered trying a hip belt squat? My wife has mild scoliosis, and the barbell back squat was also too much for her nerve wise. Hip belt squat has worked out well for her. Has the advantage of being more incrementally loadable, and not really having a weight limit, compared to what you are doing. You will need something like this ...


3

To start, if you notice that you feel pain rather than a burn or soreness in your hamstrings, it may have to do with your squat stance, rather than lagging hamstrings. However, the hamstrings are more often underdeveloped compared to their quad counterparts found in front of them for most trainee's, so a muscle imbalance isn't out of the question. And while ...


3

My checklist, roughly in order, of what to look for when I have a bad workout: Food. Am I hungry? Was I hungry yesterday? Did I eat enough protein after my last lifting session? Did I eat enough carbs today? Have I been eating enough fats the past few days? Other exercise. Was my warm-up really long today, or did I muck with the order I do my lifts? Did I ...


3

I think you are worrying too much. Even babies can do squats: While I agree that the correct form is required, it sounds like you are fixating on that fact and overcompensating on a few things. For example, you are falling backwards because your center of gravity is behind your heals. I would guess that you're worrying too much about your knees not going ...


3

There are several things you can do, just know that in a raw squat (no squat suit or compression briefs) the glute involvement is primarily at the bottom, and the hamstrings are only moderately used. With a squat suit, the leverages change and loading the hamstrings is more important. That said, the glute and hamstring activity is still ...


2

These are independent variables. The barbell should remain positioned in space in the plane defined by the line between the mid-point of each foot being extended vertically upwards. Without changing that well-agreed fact, there is a cue to keep the weight in one's heels while squatting, in order to prevent shifting onto the balls of one's feet. Notice that ...


2

It's difficult to say for sure without watching you, but it sounds as if you could be stiff in the lumber spine. You are keeping your heels down and sitting back, but because you are stiff in the lumber spine, you need to lean your shoulders further forward than you should be. Continue to work on your form. Try not to lean so far forward, and work on ...


2

I like the tree analogy. Spot on. There is no right or wrong answer. Everyone has their own way. Some work better then others. I train arms with legs. Sort of an upper lower. I also do a push pull routine. Change my routine every two months. I go heavy on compound movements then meduim to light on isolation movements such as arm work etc. just work hard not ...


2

The Rippetoe video is fairly comprehensive, and I use it as the basis of my setup. The bar should feel almost like it's locked into your back when you find the spot. When you squeeze the shoulders together and get the bar in the right spot, there's sort of a groove that forms (or will form after some delt development). I take my grip, squeeze my shoulders ...


2

Hip thrusts and glute bridges are glute (butt) specific. I suggest checking out Brett Contreras aka The Glute Guy for training advice based on both appearance and performance goals.


2

Because the rails restrict the sled to a single degree of freedom, I would think not: loading the machine asymmetrically should not result in any noticeable change in the forces on the user or the effort needed to perform the exercise. This, of course, assumes that the friction of the sled on the rails is not significantly altered by the asymmetrical ...


1

The answer to this question really depends on your goals and available resources, so I'll give a few answers depending on some possible scenarios. Assuming, for some reason, you can only (or only want to) do bodyweight exercises and are stuck indoors: Any/all of the following: Jump squats Pistol squats Burpees Weighted vest (backpack may result in a ...


1

An excellent squat variation is the goblet squat. This helps build the upper back as well as your legs. Holding a dumbbell or kettlebell in front of you, perform your squats while keeping the implement up. I find it much easier to keep the weight over your center of gravity, which will be your major limitation on using a backpack to weight the squats. ...


1

1) Some people (especially women) seem to have much more pronounced arches even when trying to be neutral. Bret Contreras has linked that a bit to more of an illusion resulting from differences in body composition (larger hips, larger butts, usually less back muscle tissue). But it's pretty common to see these crazy arched backs. Try standing up "straight" ...


1

Walking is not leg work (unless you are morbidly obese) and getting sore after squatting a 50lb barbell would imply you need to develop more strength in your legs. If this is all you can squat - which would be weird considering you said "I only care for strength and nothing else as part of my workout" - I have to disagree with Macedon93. You should be ...


1

In one word, yes. If you receive StrongLift's periodic emails, Mehdi, the program's creator usually advises that cardio or leg exercises should be reduced on resting days because that'll prevent the legs from obtaining their required rests, especially as the weights increase. So, if you're cycling 40 mins daily, your legs will have a harder time recovering ...


1

LarissaGorilla, Reading and anecdotal experiences have shown that weight squatting helps with knee pains. While i can't give a resource-backed answer at the moment, my theory is that: Squatting improves the strength of your body, including your thighs, overall legs, and body. Because the legs are now stronger, the muscles are more able to sustain the ...


1

If your depth is fine and the knee cave is moderate then don't worry about it. Maybe stay for a few extra sessions at this weight so you feel more comfortable with it. But a little knee cave isn't too much to worry about if everything else is copacetic. If you deload then ten or twenty pounds and working back up is fine.


1

I do not think you should drop the weights down and “focusing on really opening my hips up.” As long as you are not bowing the knees in to much I believe that this is somewhat of a natural progression once someone move beyond being a novice and really has to grind and work for every pound. Bowing the knees in slightly help you get out of the hole (the ...


1

I found it helpful to drop the weight and focus on good form and after a short while you can try to put on more weight. Some ligaments and muscles just need more time to adapt. An assistance exercise can not work the weak link the way your main exercise would and if you already can do this exercise in good form with less weight I see no reason why to train ...


1

Anaroebic training does have a positive effect on VO2, or oxygen consumption. The body adapts in this way for a few reasons. Firstly, intravascular pressure increases during heavy lifts, like when performing squats. Because you have to hold your breath (pretty much) and engage your core, your cardiovascular system responds by increasing blood pressure and ...


1

More than a year has passed since I wrote the question. In the meantime I became a serious runner (basically because a shoulder surgery forced me to either running or staying a couch potato). My experience now is as follows: It is running (and NOT squatting) what puts stress on my knees (Kate was right, I now know). In fact I often have to insert some ...


1

Here's one thing that happened: I went on a 2 week vacation When you're doing a novice progression, a 2-week break can set you way, way back. I think you should be working at around 175. Don't try 205 again without working your way back up. That said, there are some things. Your first squat rep was a tad high but the rest were okay. Good job! Yes, ...



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