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13

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is not something you should use to gauge the efficiency of your workouts. It's mostly only experienced when your body gets put through something it's not used to. In essence, it's not anything you need to aim for. But in terms of getting variety into your workout regimen, it's a good indicator of "hey, this is new", ...


12

The underlying basic principle to exercise is the concept that in order to force your body to get stronger, you have to demand more from your body than you have in the past. This same principle is at work whether you are a beginner or very advanced. When the body adapts to the increased demands, it does so with a little room to spare. This is called ...


6

You started squatting more so you would get better at squatting. It sounds like your plan is working. You're better at squatting since you squat more. One part of being better at squatting is that squatting doesn't make you sore. Two concerns: one, it's not clear what you mean by "attempted squat 5 failed attempts", which sounds a bit reckless. Two, if your ...


5

The soreness that you experience is called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). So by definition it is delayed. What causes it? When you exercise, the muscles get damaged. That damage is a signal for the muscle to grow and get stronger. That signal stimulates inflammation. Any inflammatory process produces local pain. Why is it delayed? It takes a day ...


4

The reason why people recommend that you do not workout the same muscle group 2 days in a row is to lower the risk of you damaging your muscles whilst they are rebuilding and strengthening from your training. Having said this... this is a recommendation not a rule. Therefore, workouts such as your Smolov squat program are perfectly okay to attempt baring ...


4

What's going to happen with front squats is that your upper back and quads will get stronger when compared to a back squat (high or low bar). That is due to the slightly different leverages involved with the lift. 225 lb front squats are really good. As to spine compression, consider the following: The musculature you build up braces your spine in ...


4

If your goal is to make your legs strong, then squats are without a doubt the best exercise you can do to achieve that goal. Squats are a universal exercise that both men and women can do with equivalent results and success, so there is no reason to be worried about results depending on your gender. Now, any exercise is better than none, so it's good that ...


4

I'm not sure what the rest of your workout looked like, and how close you were to your 1RM max, and those matter. 90 kilos doesn't mean much, since that might be 80% or 40% of your max, which is much more relevant. Either way, 10 sets of 10 reps is a lot of volume. That's 100 weighted squats, whereby most programs that are volume heavy will come in around ...


4

Lower back soreness can be indicative of bad form or it can be indicative of heavy barbell squats. It's impossible to tell which from just the information that it makes you sore. This is because heavy squats are not a leg exercise: they are a legs, butt, lower back, and upper back exercise. The lower back is generally the point of failure in maximally ...


3

You could try goblet squats, where you hold a single weight in front of you. Or you could just to bodyweight squats, and work on getting low (ideally, you want to have your upper legs parallel to the ground or slightly lower. )


3

They're probably approaching it from a hygeine and impact-safety prospective. Two rather reasonable concerns regarding barefoot lifting: In the same way you wouldn't walk barefoot around in a locker room so as to avoid foot fungus, now that problem is extending to the deadlift platform and squat rack (and wherever else you're barefoot lifting). Sure, you ...


3

As commented by others, without seeing a video of your form or knowing a bit more information it is hard to say if you are doing proper form 100%. Even then, sometimes what one person feels is proper form and causes 0 pain, someone else might have a different reaction. I find this true especially with squats. You might want to pay attention to how straight ...


2

The Rippetoe video is fairly comprehensive, and I use it as the basis of my setup. The bar should feel almost like it's locked into your back when you find the spot. When you squeeze the shoulders together and get the bar in the right spot, there's sort of a groove that forms (or will form after some delt development). I take my grip, squeeze my shoulders ...


2

Because the rails restrict the sled to a single degree of freedom, I would think not: loading the machine asymmetrically should not result in any noticeable change in the forces on the user or the effort needed to perform the exercise. This, of course, assumes that the friction of the sled on the rails is not significantly altered by the asymmetrical ...


2

Hip thrusts and glute bridges are glute (butt) specific. I suggest checking out Brett Contreras aka The Glute Guy for training advice based on both appearance and performance goals.


2

Can you define "immobile"? If you have an injury or condition you need to address that first. Otherwise Squats are a really technical exercise if you want to do them right. Most people have to start with a lot of flexibility and technique work before they can get serious. Stretching your hamstrings, gluts, quads and ankles is probably where you need to ...


2

I found plie squat kind of deceiving because watching someone do it from the front makes it looks like their legs are near 180, but every instruction I found online has you put your feet out at 45-degree angles. I'm not sure it's necessary to do more even if you can.


2

The general answer towards rep ranges has been written about previously, and it's fairly proven. But since you're asking about squats in particular, I'd offer this up: The Madcow 5x5 (non Olympic lift version of the Bill Starr 5x5) program has a set of eight reps to finish up the intensity day. So even on classic "5x5" programs, you'll still run into reps ...


2

Personally, I think doing many reps of squats is so tough on your general endurance that the endurance will be the limiting factor, not muscle strength in the muscles I want to target, it will also make you much more tired during the rest of the workout, which is bad if it's part of a whole-body workout. Also, deadlifts, and to some extent, squats, are so ...


2

I like the tree analogy. Spot on. There is no right or wrong answer. Everyone has their own way. Some work better then others. I train arms with legs. Sort of an upper lower. I also do a push pull routine. Change my routine every two months. I go heavy on compound movements then meduim to light on isolation movements such as arm work etc. just work hard not ...


2

Have you considered double kettlebell front squats? http://breakingmuscle.com/kettlebells/the-2-kettlebell-front-squat-the-best-exercise-youre-not-doing Two 53's would give you 106lbs..


2

The only thing I have been able to find is that the squat depth could affect your vertical jump ability - but I have no idea if you even remotely care about that. Anyway, this study (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2013/11000/Effect_of_Back_Squat_Depth_on_Lower_Body.11.aspx) proved that parallel squat has a higher postactivation potentiation ...


2

Just stand on a simple, cheap wooden block. Just that simple. You can make it out of several thick wooden boards glued together.


2

The Problem 5kg is waaaaaay too much to add in a single jump for most lifts for most people after the very beginner stages. It's appropriate sometimes, but many times it's too significant an increase to be ready for the higher weight with good form. Some Solutions Fractional or otherwise smaller plates. Two 2.5kg plates should not be the smallest thing ...


2

You should also look at doing some mobility work. There's a "Limber 11" video by a guy called Joe DeFranco on youtube. i started doing this a few times a week and my back feels much better on leg days.


1

Beginner level is to start at a railing or counter that you can rest your fingers on as you squat to get comfortable with the maneuver. Stand close to a railing, begin with a slight hip hinge to get your hips behind you then begin to lower down. Start slowly lowering only slightly, feel your weight move into your heels, then push through your heels to stand. ...


1

I would check out kelly starretts stuff on youtube (mwod). He is a technique and mobility guru. It is possible for everyone(normal situation) to back squat without problems when you acquire the necessary mobility.


1

For reference, here's a 2013 meta analysis from Chris Beardley on the various muscle recruitments (checked by EMG) during squats. There's not much there that really answers your question directly, but it's still a worthwhile read on the topic, especially because it graphs different levels of involvement across individual muscles in different squat stances. ...


1

It sounds like you've done a lot of solid research. Your exercise selection and daily schedule looks sound. I'd personally switch incline bench with pull-ups, because 1) I have no desire to incline bench and 2) pull-ups would balance pulling with pushing exercises, which is desirable for a number of reasons, including shoulder health. Your program's ...


1

Only the squats are heavily focused on your glutes, the others are more focused on quads, which would explain your gains on legs but not glutes. How come you have to get the bar above your head to do squats? No squat rack or such? I'd recommend squats or lunges with dumbbells to increase weight if you don't have a squat rack. There are also exercises ...



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