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14

In a sense, yes it does. It's not a permanent increase, you simply keep on burning more calories than your resting rate until your body returns to baseline. The type of exercise (the shorter, higher intensity workouts are better) also influences how long this occurs. In this study : ...


13

We get a lot of this type of question: "we know X, but can we scientifically prove X?" The answer, almost invariably in the field of strength training, is no. Science is dead; long live science There's an enormous number of variables in strength training: nutrition, hormones, time of year, mood, prior training, genetics, exercise selection, proper form, ...


10

Weight training has been going on for well over 100 years using basic tools like barbells, dumbbells, and kettlebells (originally cannonballs with handles attached). The reason you don't see much active research on the matter is a combination of the following factors: What works has been handed down from coach to student over the years. Research is only ...


10

Ways To Get Less Information The first edition of the book is much more coach-focused than the second. Perhaps you have the wrong edition for your situation? (The rest of my answer assumes that you have the second edition.) If you're looking for less information as you get started, you could try StrongLifts 5x5 instead, or look through the Starting ...


10

Deload Deload. Significantly. 10% at a minimum, more likely 20% for such a significant break. I tried to start back where I had left off after a one-week break, and it messed up my progress significantly in the short and long term. Think of it this way: say you started with a 1RM of 135, and squatted, say, 95x5x5. By squatting increasingly heavy weights ...


10

The problem with body weight exercises In the world of free weights, you have something called a one-rep max (ORM) which defines the maximum amount of weight you can lift at your current level of strength. Using the ORM you can calculate the intensity of any workout with a simple formula, which if I recall correctly is (reps * weight) / orm. What's ...


10

Optimal Jump Training Without Restrictions "Arioch" recommends squats, plyometrics, and speed work with submaximal weights to improve jumping height: An athlete wishing to improve his vertical jump should not only squat, but perform a variety of assistance work specific to both improving squatting strength as well as specifically improving jumping ...


10

I'll answer this question in the context of a popular strength program (Starting Strength) that I happen to be doing. Why only a few exercises? Because as a novice, you don't need complicated training to make general strength gains. A well chosen, small set of full-body barbell movements trains you in almost every way you need to be strong as a human ...


9

If it helps, I do about 1 hour 3x per week. You might be able to get away with 1 hour 2x per week and still make some gains--albeit a bit more slowly. The key to being efficient with your time is to perform exercises that recruit as many muscles at the same time time as possible. That also means no machines. We're talking free weights here. A beginner's ...


9

If you are on StrongLifts 5x5, a beginner program, then the problems associated with endurance training and max effort training won't be severe enough to worry about. First, a 5K takes less than an hour to complete. Second, you haven't gotten to the place in your training where you really have to choose which way you need to go. Now, to keep your 5K ...


9

This is a complex question, and no one has the complete answer, but a recent study compared the metabolic rate of a hunter gatherer culture still in existence with the metabolism of sedentary westerners and found that "daily energy expenditure of traditional Hadza foragers was no different than that of Westerners". Similarly, a study found that the ...


9

I've asked this implicitly of two qualified personal trainers. (One of the two usually trains Olympic athletes, so I trust his judgement.) Each time I said that I was interested in weight training to balance out the extra workout that my quads get (not just in the lower body, but to bring up my upper body strength too). Both of them said it was a reasonable ...


9

Any training can cause injury I am wary of bodyweight training just as much as I am wary of barbell training. Both have their risks, including tendonitis, shoulder trouble, and back problems. Overtraining is an issue under any overzealous progression. What you are looking for is not marked by any particular tool, but by cautious progression. Workout ...


8

Properly performed full squats are not unbalanced. (Also, I doubt that a medicine ball is heavy enough to produce any muscular imbalance anyway.) I worry somewhat that the 90 degree angle you describe is not deep enough, so I advise you to read this history of squat depth recommendations. Squat deep, with the crease of the hip getting lower than the top of ...


8

Getting out of bed is a muscle-building exercise for someone recovering from a coma. Tabatas and other High Intensity Interval Training, or jogging, or walking, or anything can build muscle, if the person doing it is unadapted to the activity. So yes, "cardio" exercise is an effective muscle builder, for a limited amount of time, in some circumstances. 1. ...


8

"Feeling a burn" during a workout just means that you're working endurance instead of strength or power. From my layman's understanding, which may be wrong, it's because you're no longer producing force anaerobically. Notice that you'll rarely experience that sensation on the first few reps, which is when (if you're using a challenging weight) you're doing ...


8

This tip won't help for getting the first plate on, but for subsequent plates you can roll the bar-with-first-plate onto another plate (even a 5 or 10 will work) that's laying flat on the ground. This will give you just enough clearance to load on more plates without having to lift the bar. As for that first plate, you might be able to just rest the plate ...


8

Body-building is an individual pursuit that requires specific understanding of the individual in question. A general beginner's course would be so simple as to be useless - there is no sense in writing a body-building guide for average height adult males under 60 kg; they have much more fundamental problems. Likewise, 120 kg average height females should not ...


8

Pick a goal Why do you want to lift? To look good, to be healthy, to improve athletic performance, to win a bodybuilding competition, to challenge yourself? Your goals determine the kind of lifting you'll want to focus on. I'll assume that you want a basic combination of health, fitness, and looking good. Beginner weightlifting Any beginner program should ...


8

It really depends on what you are after. If you are running the Starting Strength program or some other beginner program, they take the stance of take as much rest as you need--even 10 minutes between sets! The goal for those programs is to increase the weight on the bar as quickly as you can. Trade offs for Rest Times Longer rests provide more recovery ...


7

It's best to understand the the concept of stress and recovery. Stress includes activities such as training (Starting Strength in your case) as well as emotional and pressure related sources. Recovery is the process of adapting to deal with that stress. It includes both rest and nutrition. You can't maintain linear growth forever. The Starting Strength ...


7

Starting Strength is an AB alternating workout, so if you were to do it once every week (or every other week) then you'd have almost a full month before you did the same workout again. This is definitely not optimal. However, since Starting Strength is such a balanced routine, it won't be the end of the world. Now, some strength training will always be ...


7

Your body is telling you it's in trouble, and you're asking for ways to get stronger while continuing to do the thing that's causing the trouble. That sounds backwards. Fix your squat form, figure out what the pain in your knee is, and continue squatting with 5/3/1 or a similar intermediate program. (Or, start doing conditioning or gymnastics or Oly lifting ...


7

I will give you the same answer that I give people when they ask me if they should hire a coach for [insert sport here]. If you are progressing towards your goals, and you are happy with your progress, then there is no real need to hire a coach/trainer. Now, that being said, even if you are progressing, then there are some valid reasons to hire a ...


6

The biggest outcome you should be worried about is the potential for injury. Someone with overdeveloped quadriceps and underdeveloped hamstrings will constantly pull their hamstrings when they play sports. In a rather extreme case of this, I'll recount the story of one of my classmates on the basketball team. He started doing bench presses, and it seemed ...


6

You will be severely limiting your strength gains. Note that I am talking about the amount of strength you will be able to gain, not just the rate of gaining strength. In order to understand why, you have to understand a bit about General Adaptation Syndrome. Essentially, to disrupt homeostasis (the body's current happy place) to build strength you need ...



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