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5

Most of the respected strength training programs focus on exactly that: strength. In general the rep ranges are your biggest lever to play with with strength vs hypertrophy vs endurance. There's also relationships between muscle cross-section size as it compares to strength. Boiled down, the idea is that 2 square inches of muscle can generate more force ...


4

I'll preface this by saying this is purely my opinion based on many years of training and experience as a trainer. I, personally, would not perform “one more set with heavy weight stretching my pectorals as long as I can “ after 4 sets of regular flyes. Assuming hard work with heavy weights, your shoulders and pectoral muscles will be pretty exhausted. ...


2

People don't accidentally gain a lot of muscle, even by strength training. Gaining a lot of muscle requires hard work in the gym and at every meal. This is not something you should worry about. It is important, however, to make sure that the sources you are reading and watching focus on strength training, not bodybuilding. Strength training is for athletic ...


1

I have been climbing and competing in this sport for a long time. I am not a mountaineer but I have done a lot of sport climbing in the past and have been primarily bouldering for the last 8 years. For hand strength I suggest being very cautious in how hard you push yourself in this regard. Always use open hands when doing training specific to finger ...


1

I do 5x5 and IF and have no problem with recovery. If you are concerned with fatigue and CNS recovery than the answer really is it depends on how well your body recovers and how you feel. This will obviously be impacted by the type of workout you do also. So try it and see what happens. There is no right answer. If you're feeling fine and you are just ...


1

I used to train in a powerlifting orientated gym where several UK champion powerlifters (both male and female) called home. I can distinctly remember talking to one of the female lifters about her deadlift, and how at a bodyweight of about 60kg, she pulled a 170kg deadlift, but could only bench 60kg, whereas some of the guys I knew could bench around 150kg ...


1

You'll need to do both to some extent, and as always it depends on context. Notes on the articles linked Firstly the Arnold article also mentions he recommends doing higher reps at a lighter weight (8-12 reps) for some exercises so the "going heavy" recommendation isn't absolute. Secondly the VERDICT in the Flex article is an example of misconstrued ...


1

You want to increace the size of your muscles, this process is called muscle hypertrophy and it involves an increase in size of skeletal muscle through a growth in size of its component cells. Two factors contribute to hypertrophy: sarcoplasmic hypertrophy, which focuses more on increased muscle glycogen storage; and myofibrillar hypertrophy, which ...



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