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5

If you're overtraining or near overtraining, taking a rest week (or two, or three) often results in a performance increase. Since you've had issues with overtraining before, this may be the situation. Taking time off is not helpful in all situations but it can work. Many workout programs (for instance, 5/3/1) recommend a 'deload week' or a complete rest ...


3

I wouldn't sweat the difference in weights you can do on one versus the other, there can be a lot of good reasons for that. The angles, range of motion, and muscle involvement all shift. On heavy barbell rows, despite your best efforts, your chest will drop a bit to meet the bar. On the lever machine, you can't get away with that. On a pure row, the weight ...


3

yes it does leave out the lower back, hips and hamstrings you use to help generate power resulting in far less weight used BUT... you get more stimulation on the target areas like the middle traps and lats no you have not Simply put if you want to gain lots of mass in your genral back then go with the pendaly or normal bent over rows but if you want to ...


2

The Informed Sport website describes it's registration process, which can explain why a number of products are not registered. Essentially, the manufacturer has to actively seek them out. The major issue with the supplement market is that it is unregulated, and any voluntary regulation like this costs money. Unless the companies who are registered get a ...


2

I don't see the point in switching up your program instead of fixing your nutrition and sleep. Moreover, I don't see the point in doing this specific hybrid. If you want rows, try Phrak's GSLP: As is, you're making a lot of changes to parts of the program that have nothing to do with your stated desires for customization. Many seem both arbitrary or ...


2

I've done this, and I found that it may have helped improve my overhead press by five or ten pounds over the course of a month. It also stressed my shoulder joint (through both overuse and under-warmup) to the point where I had to take time off training.


2

Sprinting sessions typically are once to twice a week. When sprinting, you want to work with either low intensity (<75%), or high intensity (>95%). Don't try and skirt the middle, as you won't ream any real benefit from it. Low intensity will be good for development of improved sprinting form, active recovery, and improved endurance. High intensity ...


1

Any exercise program is going to require calories to support building strength and muscle. While you make no reference to the exercises, sets, and reps you are performing, let’s assume that you are fueling your body sufficiently for the three training days. You can check that by using one of the many online calorie estimators. While they can approximate ...


1

If I understand your question, you could look at it a little more basically and ask: Is someone who's doing a bit more physical work during the day going to have better strength than someone who doesn't? If you hopped up from your desk and tried to 1RM a deadlift after sitting on your butt for a couple of hours, that would probably be a bad idea. ...


1

What volume would I have to work with in order to see any positive benefit? If you are going to incorporate an exercise into a frequent daily routine then you need it to be very low volume, otherwise you will over stress your body without giving it time to recover and build muscle. This concept of low-volume exercises throughout the day is called ...



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