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4

Indeed, the answer is no. To be strong, you need to lift heavy weights, there is no way around that. You will never get strong if you limit yourself to light weights with high reps : that will just build up your endurance. For instance, marathon runners have a lot of endurance, but cannot compete with 100m athletes (which have a lot more power). In order ...


3

Minor story detour before my answer. I am 5ft5, 80kg, and I work out regularly and have respectable lifting ability compared to the average joe. My friend is 80kg, 6ft and cannot lift their bodyweight in any lift. We did some archery last week, after half a hour I look over and my friend is struggling a lot to keep his shoulders level, chest flat, arms ...


3

All of the exercises you listed are good, and of course, reducing body weight is helpful as well. However, the most difficult part of the strict muscle up is the transition between the pull-up and the dip, and the best way to train this movement is to do it. Like any other exercise, you will improve by working through a progression. If you wanted to increase ...


2

What you've laid out actually looks like a well laid out plan for your goal, so good job for that. I'll just throw my few cents in for additional tips. Losing weight will certainly help you with pretty much every bodyweight exercise, however it's very important that you maintain most of the muscle you already have. Consume adequate protein (about a gram ...


2

There are 2 basic ways to progress training. More reps or more weight. Both work to some extent. You could try doing say 30 reps with 20lbs or 5 reps with 60lbs and get some strength gains as a beginner. But in general keeping the reps in the 4-10 range gives better strength results than doing more reps. For fun try lifting a 40lb weight for reps. You can ...


1

Yes... to an extent, but even then it's very ineffective. Any work under about 15 reps will build your muscle size which will help strength. But not much, and only noticeably whilst you're a relative beginner. It will be FAR easier, faster and more effective for you to work up to using 100lbs as your maximum weight for low reps, and at that point 60lbs will ...


1

No you will not be able to lift 60 pounds by practising with 20 and 40 10 miles pounds, Just continue with the 60 pounds, it doesn't matter for 5 times in the beginning, slowly improve the number of times you lift it. I can't run 10 miles by walking 20 miles a day, If I want to run, I have to start running, it might start with 1 mile but slowly I can ...


1

The problem here is what you are defining your "maintenance" as. I assume you've found a magic maintenance calculator, plugged in your details and got a number? In that case you want to add calories burned through training on top of that. What you need to worry about is total calories burned in your day. If you go above that you gain weight, if you go ...


1

Few principles at play here. I'll keep it in simple English to make this as useful as possible. Before that, yes your muscles are rested and ready to perform better. Doing physical effort for long periods of time is good to maintain your musculature but it won't directly help your sport. It basically means that the negative effect of time you spent off from ...



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