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9

If you can't increase the weight on the bar, then you have to settle for moving the bar faster (good for strength and power), reducing rest periods between sets (good for conditioning, hypertrophy (sometimes), and endurance), increasing the number of reps per set (good for endurance, conditioning, and hypertrophy), increasing the number of sets (good for ...


8

This is sort of a complicated question from a physiological point of view. Muscle is made of myocytes (muscle cells), which are made of a few things of interest in relation to your question. Let's look at a diagram: The myofibril (called out above) are the packs of fibers in the muscle, which are responsible for contraction of the tissue. They're ...


7

"Beginner gains" is a useful abstraction for what I conjecture is an interrelated set of physiological processes. Part of it is the systemic hormonal response to the first time someone does resistance training, part of it is easy improvements to neurological efficiency (i.e. you get better at the movement, so can lift more weight independent of your ...


6

You're sore Wednesday because you squatted Monday. Soreness from lifting can easily last two or three days, and even get worse on later days. It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. Since waking up this morning, my lower back is very sore. It is as if I did a heavy workout. I don't understand why this happened. This wasn't as sore yesterday. ...


6

First we need to understand what strength is and what types of strength there are (Ross Enamait describes it nicely on this page http://rosstraining.com/blog/strength-training-for-fighters/): However, he is talking about fighters and their need for strength but the concept is the same. Maximal Strength – Maximal strength is defined as the amount of force ...


5

Disclaimer: I was certified as a personal trainer from the organization I mention below. The term you're looking for is Certified Personal Trainer (CPT). I strongly recommend, given your training history and comments, that you seek out a trainer certified by a reputable organization. I emphasize “certified” because they are required, usually through ...


5

mitro's answer is really good, but I'd like to add on it. It's going to be hard to really build strength without weight, but there are a few things you can consider in the meantime: Volume progression - good strength/powerlifting programs (Sheiko, Juggernaut, etc.) use volume as a main training stimulus rather than intensity. By increasing your training ...


5

Most of the respected strength training programs focus on exactly that: strength. In general the rep ranges are your biggest lever to play with with strength vs hypertrophy vs endurance. There's also relationships between muscle cross-section size as it compares to strength. Boiled down, the idea is that 2 square inches of muscle can generate more force ...


4

You can definitely build strong legs with bodyweight squats, but you're going to hit a wall with diminishing returns pretty quickly aiming for 20-30 range reps...as far as strength is concerned, anyway. If you're looking for absolute strength gains, and you're dead set on bodyweight movements, I think you'd see much better results taking a 5x5-type (sets x ...


4

May I suggest the plank hold? It works your entire chest, back, abs, and delts. This allows pressure more on elbows than wrists. Also when in plank position, I suppose you could lower yourself up and down as a substitute for regular push up?


4

You know, it looks pretty damn decent. The program you are currently following is well and beyond sufficient for you to constantly improve as far as your strength goes. I'm sure you know that you'll improve on conditioning and lower your bodyfat at the same time and just a suggestion maybe add some sprints into the mix, not a requirement however, what you ...


4

There's a few things to consider. First is where you are on the strength spectrum. A novice doing "5x5", while probably not the smartest idea in the world, isn't nearly as damaging as an advanced athlete doing "5x5". The stronger you get the more damage you can do to yourself and, as a result, the longer it takes to heal. But even in the popular StrongLifts ...


4

I would suggest you skip the DVDs and get the StrongLifts app. It's a beginners strength program and the app makes it super easy to follow. If you're just switching to strength training I'm certain you'll see some really nice gains the coming months. Should you also want to keep your metcon up while using SL, then just throw in the odd Tabata workouts. Five ...


4

Taking your questions one by one: (1) The eccentric portions of lifts are known to both cause more soreness and be more prone to injury. Combined with the extreme weights that are lifted during a deadlift, it creates a lot of incentive for people to neglect the eccentric phase and just drop the weight. It is good to note however that in a competition ...


4

It is a misconception that strength and hypertrophy are somehow mutually exclusive things. Keep in mind that the strongest powerlifters train like bodybuilders most of the time, where the main difference appears when peaking for a competition, where the powerlifters peak towards maximal strength rather than maximal leanness. The strength of a lifter depends ...


4

The key to continued progress ...is variation. Like TestWell said in a comment, "after a year of any program, it's time to switch it up", and that's honestly the best answer. But allow me to elaborate. Options There are enough options out there to fill entire volumes of books. It's not really a case of choosing the right one. It's more a case of finding ...


4

I haven't heard of any reliable sources recommending not squatting barefooted. The only reasons I can think of are probable imbalances (the one Alec suggested) , hygiene issues (some gyms may not like you squatting barefooted due to cleanliness) and dropping the weights on your toes (which even with shoes wouldn't make too much difference to the health of ...


4

Deadlift properly It's almost impossible to remotely determine what the trouble is, but: during deadlift, while pulling, my upper back is rounding but once I reach the top most position, everything is locked and I attain perfect 'chest up' That's not good. For a strong back, you want a perfect, tense, straight, shoulderblades-retracted position for ...


4

There's the answer in the general case, and there's the answer for this case. First this case, then the general. You Are Fucking Around Starting Strength, but with carrying exercises...StrongLifts, but with Olympic work...no, wait, pull-ups...then planks and front squats...plus overhead squats...and now round-backed deadlifts? I don't say this to be mean, ...


4

Like Alex L mentioned in a comment, your program completely lacks progressive overload, which is how we actually get stronger. Progressive overload is the increase of intensity that we place on our body, and we do this in two ways; increasing the resistance by using more weight increaseing the volume by doing more sets and repetitions Unless you go to ...


4

I'll preface this by saying this is purely my opinion based on many years of training and experience as a trainer. I, personally, would not perform “one more set with heavy weight stretching my pectorals as long as I can “ after 4 sets of regular flyes. Assuming hard work with heavy weights, your shoulders and pectoral muscles will be pretty exhausted. ...


4

light weightlifting This will not build muscle for you. Lift heavier weights. some cardio excerise This fights your effort to gain muscle. Consider doing less cardio if you want to grow muscle. traditional Indian diet You're not giving much detail here, but more food, particularly more protein, would almost certainly help. To recap: to grow ...


3

Use Your Body (or someone else's) This is where a buddy is great. Have them provide the resistance by grabbing your forearms. It may take some finagling, but you'll get a good position. You can do this for just about any free-weight exercise. Curls? Done. Bench press? Done. Flys? Done, done, done. The great thing is, with a little bit of adjustment, your ...


3

If you want to get stronger you need to get muscle and you need to make sure to use all the potential the muscle has. A bigger muscle has more potential, a smaller muscle can however still be stronger. Muscle growth is achieved by hypertrophy, Strenght is achieved by training the lift you want to be stronger at and train them in the couple of reps you want ...


3

The biggest problem I see with this approach is that you spend a lot of time in opposite ends of the volume spectrum. Look at total reps over time: 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 That's eight workouts in a row of fairly high volume, followed by a dropoff to extremely low volume that's sustained for two workouts. Depending on the number of workouts ...


3

If you cannot currently perform two sets of 30 bodyweight (air) squats, then yes: air squats will build muscle and strength quite well. If you are looking for an alternative to barbells for strength training your squat, the goblet squat is probably the best answer: Some gyms also have "safety squat bars" that don't require reaching behind one's back to ...


3

Yes.....but Body weight squats will increase your leg strengths initially. If you don't run or play sports that require running, you should experience some strength in your legs (quads, glutes, and calves). However, if you do perform these sports, you won't really experience an extra benefit to body weight squats. Frankly, body weight squats is more of ...


3

Start out like everyone else Obviously, you're not excused from working your entire body, because if you just train certain areas, you're messing up your body, so first things first, get a regular training program, and start from there. Rock climbing specific training The one area where rock climbers simply excel beyond anyone else, is the ratio between ...


3

It seems that you either started too low on StrongLifts, or you are indeed a beginner based on continuing to make progress on the program. You'll only benefit from exhausting your beginner gains in a linear based program like this. You'll be able to go back much stronger for your Olympic lifts. In the meantime, to avoid losing technical proficiency, I'd ...


3

Forty minutes of gym time is an unrealistically low expectation if one is looking for the same effects as a multi-exercise program. If 40 minutes is a hard cap--which I'd advise against having--then first I'd only do one work set. Warm up with the bar, add weight in logical big-plate increments (e.g. 20kg, then 40kg, then 60kg, then 80kg, then 100kg), then ...



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