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9

Any training can cause injury I am wary of bodyweight training just as much as I am wary of barbell training. Both have their risks, including tendonitis, shoulder trouble, and back problems. Overtraining is an issue under any overzealous progression. What you are looking for is not marked by any particular tool, but by cautious progression. Workout ...


8

It really depends on what you are after. If you are running the Starting Strength program or some other beginner program, they take the stance of take as much rest as you need--even 10 minutes between sets! The goal for those programs is to increase the weight on the bar as quickly as you can. Trade offs for Rest Times Longer rests provide more recovery ...


7

I will give you the same answer that I give people when they ask me if they should hire a coach for [insert sport here]. If you are progressing towards your goals, and you are happy with your progress, then there is no real need to hire a coach/trainer. Now, that being said, even if you are progressing, then there are some valid reasons to hire a ...


6

Are there disadvantages to longer rests between sets? Sure. I cool down if I wait longer than five or so minutes between heavy squat sets, and that can be a problem if my mobility is iffy and I really need to be warm to get good form. It's also annoying to have the two-hour-plus workouts that result from 10-minute rests between sets of, say, heavy ...


6

A big portion of it is simply the mechanics of the lift. Just try to stand on one leg in a conventional deadlift stance (sumo would be impossible). You run into the big question of what to do with the leg you aren't using. If you stick it in front of you like a pistol, grabbing the bar becomes nearly impossible. If you stick it behind you there is a high ...


6

Physiotherapists usually make you do several light sets every day in order to strengthen your healing injuries. Yes. If reducing the volume to one only set per exercise obviously reduces the chances of over-training and injury It doesn't obviously reduce the chances of over-training and injury. why not training a single set per exercise, every ...


5

Your suspicion that locking out your shoulders might be detrimental to your shoulders, I would say, is a correct assumption. Our shoulders are one of the joints that, I think, are most prone to injury due to incorrect technique in a wide variety of exercise, so I would say that, you should always try to look up proper technique beforehand as well as listen ...


5

The shoulder is deemed to be a joint of the ball and socket type, as is the hip. The major difference is that in the hip, there is actually a bony socket on the pelvis (Called the acetabulum) that the head of the femur fits into. There really is no such structure in the shoulder, the "socket" in the shoulder is made up of tendon and cartilage structures. ...


5

It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), and is a natural consequence of changing either intensity or volume on anything you are doing. It's temporary, and once you get used to the new regular workload you won't get it anymore. It has no effect on your ability to train or carry any risk of injury. It's simply uncomfortable. A little ...


5

Ain't nobody can tell you who you are, son. Powerliftin' is three things, you see? It's the squat, the deadlift--yep, just picking it up off the floor--and the bench. Right there, that's powerliftin', ayup. You squat? Deadlift? Bench? Yeah? All right then, yer a powerlifter if you want it. Hell, I'll give y'a pass on one o' the t'ree if you got yrself some ...


5

Right now, today, I could back squat 100kg for five. But if I were starting a per-workout linear progression like StrongLifts, it would be a terrible idea to start with 100kg. Even 90kg would be ill-advised. I don't want to start lifting at my 5RM or even a high percentage of it. I want to leave some space as a buffer so that I can continue to add weight. ...


5

If cost is an issue, Why not see a Personnal Trainer once a month when your program needs changing, or every other week. If you get a good one, you will benefit greatly, not only from their motivation, but from their vast knowledge bank. Personal trainers vary greatly,(some are definitely better than others, and may specialise in areas of training you are ...


5

In order to understand how to pick the implements, you need to know what they are doing for you. I'll rank the implements in order of difficulty--assuming you have the same total weight, they will feel progressively less difficult: Kettlebells (KB): Because each hand is loaded separately, you have to work harder to stabilize the KB. Additionally, the KB ...


4

Bodyweight Cannot Replicate Barbells Is bodyweight training effective for strength and muscle gain? Yes. So are barbells, dumbbells, kettlebells, bands, and any other form of resistance. That does not mean they are equally effective. Are there muscle groups that such a training plan does not properly address? Any training modality can omit muscle ...


4

Keep running. Your legs have all the strength they need to run. What you need to develop is muscular endurance. Squats will build strength, but they won't give you the endurance. You should also give your muscles a bit of rest after you 6k runs if they really tire your legs out that much. Alternate days that leave your legs feeling tired, exhausted, or ...


3

Basic Beginner Lifting If I were new to weight training and doing yoga (or almost anything) four times a week, I'd either: A) Reduce the yoga (or sport, or hiking, or whatever) to three times a week and weight train twice a week for a while, focusing on achieving a basic standard of strength (see footnote) B) Keep doing yoga four times a week and strength ...


3

I'm starting out by saying Dave Liepman's answer is pretty spot on. There are plenty of programs out there that are good, including Gray Skull, Hepburn, Wendler 5/3/1, Big-15 (Paul Carter), etc. Take a look at them and figure out what fits your desires best. As to the knee pain, there are a couple things to consider: Foam rolling or LaCrosse ball ...


3

Yes, there are disadvantages in that you won't be stressing your muscles enough to get all the growth that is possible out of each session. Muscle growth is a combination of two different types of hypertrophy, sarcoplasmic and myofibril. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy produces more size, but less strength (This is what is stimulated by the 8-12 rep range), while ...


3

You're right that this program has a lot of volume. You'd be better off choosing from one of many well-known beginner programs (ie Westside For Skinny Bastards, PHAT, Strong Lifts, 5/3/1). If you're insistent on doing these exact exercises it would make more sense to organize them into a push/pull or upper/lower split, as this is a standard practice for ...


3

The shoulder joint is designed for flexibility and motion rather than for stability. Its stability comes largely from coordinated muscle control rather than its bony structure. The shoulder blade or scapula is a foundation of the shoulder complex. When the scapulae are well stabilized against the chest wall, the rotator cuff and other shoulder muscles ...


3

I'll start with the overall theory. Greg Nuckols wrote an excellent article on increasing work capacity, which is at the core of getting stronger. It provides a great framework to understand everything else. Option 1: Same weight, but increase reps. This is essentially how the Doug Hepburn training routines are designed. Another example of programs in ...


3

The website Exrx publishes Weight Lifting Standards, which are recommended strength goals for people of different bodyweights who have been training for different lengths of time. They only cover a handful of major lifts (press, bench, squat, deadlift, clean). You may find it useful. I believe that this information is derived from Lon Kilgore, who is a ...


3

I have had back issues my whole life - mainly lower back. When I was lifting heavy, squats and deadlifts threw me fits. You getting close to about double your weight. This is where it gets a bit tricky for some. What surprises me is that you are not having the same back issues squatting. I think you need to take a step back here and think long-term ...


3

There are several reasons why you would where a weight belt and the best reason is: To protect your lower back. It depends on what weight you are lifting, if you are lifting something that require some effort then you would need a weight belt. Please have look at this links with more information. All of the upsides to wearing a belt come down to the ...


3

This question might be more suited for the parenting stack exchange, however there are a few things you can try. First of all, holding and moving a baby (or any deadweight) relies less on raw strength and more on static holds of a load and leg and core strength. Also, this will be one of the more ridiculous things I've written, ever... Note : Always use ...


3

The time of day that is most beneficial to lift weights is the time of day you can do it consistently. There's a few things that you need to know about circadian rhythms: The effects of hormonal cycles during waking hours are minimal They adapt to your pattern of life If you can more consistently train in the afternoon, your body will adjust to make it ...


3

I tried doing squats about 3 years ago for the first time and experienced the same problem as you - couldn't balance, knee position, etc. I posted a couple questions with exceptional answers on the topic: Is it normal when starting squats to not have flexible enough ankles? Excercises to try correct knees pointing inward I avoided them for another year ...


3

Per a 5/3/1 article by Jim Wendler on T-Nation, you're supposed to have supplemental cardio two or three times a week: The Triumvirate uses three exercises per workout, one of which is a core lift. Before each workout, do a warm-up that includes mobility, flexibility, something to raise your core temperature and heart rate (like rope jumping), and foam ...


3

The yellow part is referred to as the yolk. It's actually not as bad as the rap it gets, although eating 12 egg whites at a time is bit high. But I'll leave that alone for now. A google search for "cheap sources of protein" will give you a whole flood of answers, pretty much all of which are cheap in part because they are whole or less wasteful. A post from ...


2

I relax fully at the bottom of the pull-up. This ensures that I work the maximum amount of muscle. Mark Rippetoe suggests the same approach: If you relax your arms at the bottom and let your shoulders slide down, the muscles that have to pull you back up from that position are the lats and upper back muscles. Since we want to work them, use the full ROM ...



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