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9

Any training can cause injury I am wary of bodyweight training just as much as I am wary of barbell training. Both have their risks, including tendonitis, shoulder trouble, and back problems. Overtraining is an issue under any overzealous progression. What you are looking for is not marked by any particular tool, but by cautious progression. Workout ...


7

I will give you the same answer that I give people when they ask me if they should hire a coach for [insert sport here]. If you are progressing towards your goals, and you are happy with your progress, then there is no real need to hire a coach/trainer. Now, that being said, even if you are progressing, then there are some valid reasons to hire a ...


6

Physiotherapists usually make you do several light sets every day in order to strengthen your healing injuries. Yes. If reducing the volume to one only set per exercise obviously reduces the chances of over-training and injury It doesn't obviously reduce the chances of over-training and injury. why not training a single set per exercise, every ...


6

The time of day that is most beneficial to lift weights is the time of day you can do it consistently. There's a few things that you need to know about circadian rhythms: The effects of hormonal cycles during waking hours are minimal They adapt to your pattern of life If you can more consistently train in the afternoon, your body will adjust to make it ...


6

In order to understand how to pick the implements, you need to know what they are doing for you. I'll rank the implements in order of difficulty--assuming you have the same total weight, they will feel progressively less difficult: Kettlebells (KB): Because each hand is loaded separately, you have to work harder to stabilize the KB. Additionally, the KB ...


6

Basically, you want to do compound exercises before isolation exercises. Why? Because compounds give you the most 'bang for your buck'. You could do 5 isolation exercises for your legs, or you just squat and hit all the muscles at once. Compounds also have a much better effect on the release of anabolic hormones and central nervous system activation. Some ...


5

Ain't nobody can tell you who you are, son. Powerliftin' is three things, you see? It's the squat, the deadlift--yep, just picking it up off the floor--and the bench. Right there, that's powerliftin', ayup. You squat? Deadlift? Bench? Yeah? All right then, yer a powerlifter if you want it. Hell, I'll give y'a pass on one o' the t'ree if you got yrself some ...


5

Right now, today, I could back squat 100kg for five. But if I were starting a per-workout linear progression like StrongLifts, it would be a terrible idea to start with 100kg. Even 90kg would be ill-advised. I don't want to start lifting at my 5RM or even a high percentage of it. I want to leave some space as a buffer so that I can continue to add weight. ...


5

If cost is an issue, Why not see a Personnal Trainer once a month when your program needs changing, or every other week. If you get a good one, you will benefit greatly, not only from their motivation, but from their vast knowledge bank. Personal trainers vary greatly,(some are definitely better than others, and may specialise in areas of training you are ...


5

"Programs? I don't follow any, but any decent regimen of training should increase strength. People got stronger before "strength programs" existed, so I will not consider any." Welp, have fun then! If you refuse to train in a successful manner then I expect you will keep seeing the results you have been seeing.


4

Wendler 5/3/1 is designed around certain assumptions, and until you know how your body responds to the stimulus that the program provides you really don't have a foundation of knowledge of what the program isn't doing for you. There's already a great deal of flexibility in the program, but training 7 days a week is not within those constraints. Wendler ...


3

There are several reasons why you would where a weight belt and the best reason is: To protect your lower back. It depends on what weight you are lifting, if you are lifting something that require some effort then you would need a weight belt. Please have look at this links with more information. All of the upsides to wearing a belt come down to the ...


3

I have had back issues my whole life - mainly lower back. When I was lifting heavy, squats and deadlifts threw me fits. You getting close to about double your weight. This is where it gets a bit tricky for some. What surprises me is that you are not having the same back issues squatting. I think you need to take a step back here and think long-term ...


3

I would advise to not use your child for weight resistance training. Who will spot you? How about just play with your kid.


3

This question might be more suited for the parenting stack exchange, however there are a few things you can try. First of all, holding and moving a baby (or any deadweight) relies less on raw strength and more on static holds of a load and leg and core strength. Also, this will be one of the more ridiculous things I've written, ever... Note : Always use ...


3

I tried doing squats about 3 years ago for the first time and experienced the same problem as you - couldn't balance, knee position, etc. I posted a couple questions with exceptional answers on the topic: Is it normal when starting squats to not have flexible enough ankles? Excercises to try correct knees pointing inward I avoided them for another year ...


3

Per a 5/3/1 article by Jim Wendler on T-Nation, you're supposed to have supplemental cardio two or three times a week: The Triumvirate uses three exercises per workout, one of which is a core lift. Before each workout, do a warm-up that includes mobility, flexibility, something to raise your core temperature and heart rate (like rope jumping), and foam ...


3

The yellow part is referred to as the yolk. It's actually not as bad as the rap it gets, although eating 12 egg whites at a time is bit high. But I'll leave that alone for now. A google search for "cheap sources of protein" will give you a whole flood of answers, pretty much all of which are cheap in part because they are whole or less wasteful. A post from ...


3

First, congratulations for taking the time to exercise. It's an achievement by itself (considering many people want to, but don't end up doing it). Second, If you really want to follow the StrongLifts 5X5 program, no, you cannot use dumbbells. You need to use a barbell and weights. Why? For one, you cannot squat with dumbbells. The core of the program ...


3

First off, most routines are not created for one person specifically, so they won't address that person's specific needs, prior injuries, disbalances etc. So some adjustments will most likely have to be made by each individual person to suit their needs. In your case, your shoulder takes probably more time to regenerate than the creator of your routine ...


3

When I work the Starting Strength program, I always include pullups. A few suggestions for increasing reps: First, I would also suggest ditching the band. I find the bands helpful for working up to a single rep of a pullup variant, but after that I find that greasing the groove and speed variation are better for actually adding reps. To move up from a ...


3

Food plus lifting equals get bigger It seems like you're saying that when you walk a lot, eat moderately, and do nothing else that you lose a little bit of weight--likely fat, but perhaps also muscle. It also seems like you're saying that when you add heavy lifting and a lot of eating that you gain weight. Nothing about that is surprising: (Lots of ...


3

Everybody loves anecdotes so I'll start with one. I got to pick the brain of this great bodybuilder named Bernie Cooper once on Christmas Eve in a bar in Edinburgh. The man obviously did have some "assistance", but he told me the only thing he ever changed when "cutting" was that he added some cardio to his routine. Anyway, the fact is this: You'll only ...


3

5/3/1 is a very specific program with a very specific goal. If you want to build strength consistently it's one of the go-to-programs. Wendler himself expressly forbids you to tinker with it, though, and for good reason. Once you start increasing frequency, you will probably not be able to keep up with the intensity, which was the whole point of 5/3/1 to ...


3

For future viewers- BodyPump: 60 minute program aimed at high repetitions on common weighted exercises BodyAttack: 45-55 minute class focused on cardio exercises and done without weights Your feeling after the BodyPump session is congruent with the types of exercises; you'd have to drop the weight a significant amount to see the workout shift towards ...


2

I could do a front lever when I was 20-22 years old. Haven't tried but I don't think I have a chance now. I find that it is a tendon/balancing exercise. One of the great things about it is that it really picks on your least acclimated body part. It shows you where you need to work. Practicing Get a partner who will take some body weight off of you ...


2

A lot of body builders I have worked with wear athletic tights and shorts. For deadlifts I prefer people to wear warm-ups. Example would be you basic nike/adidas basketball/soccer style warm-ups. These have a little sheen to them and the bar glides up the leg better. Athletic tights are great too. I can't convince kids to buy/wear these though so I ...


2

Deadlift with less volume, a bit more frequently, and increment more slowly. You're might be deadlifting with too much volume per workout (5x5). Deadlifts could be trained with less volume at the work weight. 1 set of 5 (after warm-up sets at lower weights). This will allow you to deadlift every 4 days, rather than once a week. However, as part of Bill ...


2

What my new therapist uses to prescribe in order to help healing not very severe tendon problems is slow eccentric exercises, aka negative phases, with very light weights, two or three sets, three times a day, everyday. Now, I think that you don't need to be a rocket scientist to understand that, whatever is useful to heal and strengthen an injured tendon, ...


2

Sets are primarily a method of controlling volume. More volume means more training stimulus, which means a harder but hopefully more fruitful recovery period. I don't know of any relevance the total volume has to tendon health. A moderate weight done for 8 to 12 reps in a slow, controlled fashion is the important part for tendon health. I would increase the ...



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