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1

The principles behind 5/3/1 are still pretty sound, although the rep ranges aren't the best for everyone. Here's the good: It's an example of micro-periodization over a month ** High(ish) reps, Medium reps, Low reps Average work load for the month is between 75-85% My coach had me do something 5/3/1 like for a while and it worked well for me. It was ...


1

If I do a push/pull split my workout will be shorter (in time) and my wrists will have more time to recover, but I will have to cut down the total number of pull sets, otherwise my writst will suffer. Not necessarily. More time between workouts could mean that your wrists fully recover and are ready for the increased volume. If I do a ...


3

The biggest problem I see with this approach is that you spend a lot of time in opposite ends of the volume spectrum. Look at total reps over time: 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 That's eight workouts in a row of fairly high volume, followed by a dropoff to extremely low volume that's sustained for two workouts. Depending on the number of workouts ...


1

Well, yes. DOMS isn't only experienced after focusing on exercise, but whenever your muscles have been subjected to strenuous work which it's not accustomed to. It's very possible that cardio is the culprit, but for someone who doesn't exercise at all, even taking a flight of stairs could cause DOMS. It's sometimes hard to pinpoint the exact reason, given ...


2

The Problem 5kg is waaaaaay too much to add in a single jump for most lifts for most people after the very beginner stages. It's appropriate sometimes, but many times it's too significant an increase to be ready for the higher weight with good form. Some Solutions Fractional or otherwise smaller plates. Two 2.5kg plates should not be the smallest thing ...


0

This is as close as I know of, from a 2001 study. When all subjects were pooled together, absolute RMR significantly increased by 7% (5928 +/- 1225 vs 6328 +/- 1336 kJ.d-1, P < 0.001). Furthermore, ST increased absolute RMR by 7% in both young (6302 +/- 1458 vs 6719 +/- 1617 kJ x d(-1), P < 0.01) and older (5614 +/- 916 vs 5999 +/- 973 kJ x ...


2

Initially, what you're doing is just fine for starting out, but the problem will arise that you won't be progressing past a certain point. You have a set of dumbbells and that's great, but what will you do when you should be increasing the weight? You're already managing 10-20 reps with the weight you have, but in order to stimulate progress in strength and ...


-1

Deadlifts on their own would not add muscle even though they are often attributed to it. In order for you to pack on muscle, you would have to eat more to sustain enough energy to warrant muscle group. If you deadlift and your nutrition is off point and your not eating enough, you won't build muscle.



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