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Minor story detour before my answer. I am 5ft5, 80kg, and I work out regularly and have respectable lifting ability compared to the average joe. My friend is 80kg, 6ft and cannot lift their bodyweight in any lift. We did some archery last week which I we enjoyed. After half a hour I look over and my friend is struggling a lot to keep his shoulders level, ...


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Indeed, the answer is no. To be strong, you need to lift heavy weights, there is no way around that. You will never get strong if you limit yourself to light weights with high reps : that will just build up your endurance. For instance, marathon runners have a lot of endurance, but cannot compete with 100m athletes (which have a lot more power). In order ...


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The problem here is what you are defining your "maintenance" as. I assume you've found a magic maintenance calculator, plugged in your details and got a number? In that case you want to add calories burned through training on top of that. What you need to worry about is total calories burned in your day. If you go above that you gain weight, if you go ...


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Short answer: you have to consider the actual calories (the remaining amount after burning calories off). Example: Let's say I ate 2800kcal, burned 500kcal off and I need calculated 3100kcal to gain weight. On this day I won't gain muscle theoretically, because 800kcal are missing for that goal. But one day does not matter. Always talke your weekly ...


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I do a full-body, two-hour workout twice a week. I progress at a normal rate. With that said, I can lose about two to three pounds of fat a month (roughly 240 to 360 calories loss a day). It's not much, I know, but it's better than nothing. All you need is 1 gram of protein per lean body weight, and just enough carbs for workout days to get you through. ...


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Yeah I was wondering the same thing a few years back. But let's just reason this out here. So, in order to build something, anything, you need something to build it with. That's obvious right? You can't build a brick wall without bricks or a staircase without stairs. Now, let's say you order 1,000 bricks and you want to build a wall with 900 bricks. Assume, ...


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6'4 and 180 lbs sounds VERY lean (so you probably just need to eat more to be honest, more complex carbs to be concise). Assuming it's not an injury since you didn't describe pain, the most likely cause of this is that your ATP or glycogen levels are low. If you are depleted in glycogen, your first set will always be more or less regular, and then you will ...


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Few principles at play here. I'll keep it in simple English to make this as useful as possible. Before that, yes your muscles are rested and ready to perform better. Doing physical effort for long periods of time is good to maintain your musculature but it won't directly help your sport. It basically means that the negative effect of time you spent off from ...


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What you've laid out actually looks like a well laid out plan for your goal, so good job for that. I'll just throw my few cents in for additional tips. Losing weight will certainly help you with pretty much every bodyweight exercise, however it's very important that you maintain most of the muscle you already have. Consume adequate protein (about a gram ...


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All of the exercises you listed are good, and of course, reducing body weight is helpful as well. However, the most difficult part of the strict muscle up is the transition between the pull-up and the dip, and the best way to train this movement is to do it. Like any other exercise, you will improve by working through a progression. If you wanted to increase ...



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