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Eccentric (lengthening of a muscle) causes strength increases, but if it was more valuable than the concentric (tightening) activities people would just sit around doing negatives all day and then show up and bench 1000lbs without ever having pushed the bar off their chest before: it's ridiculous. I'd answer your question by saying that there are three ...


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The eccentric phase of a lift is classically part of mass gaining but there are other practices which skip almost all eccentric training and produce large mass gain. One group are Olympic Weightlifters, who drop the majority of their lifts. They do not lack for mass! ...


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Ditch your routine and go with the Starting Strength program. It will be much more effective in the short and long term. Buy the book. Follow the program. Become strong and powerful. You're wasting time doing isolation exercises, missing out on hormone bumps that come from compound lifts, getting yourself out of muscular balance, not on any kind of ...


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There's nothing wrong with the order of exercises you're currently performing. However, to avoid a training plateau, you should consider changing up your routine on a regular basis. Typically, that's every 6 to 8 weeks. For example, as you've asked, perform all chest exercises first, then biceps. Or, perform biceps first, then chest. You should base it ...


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Depends, yes, it has to be mantained. The longer you have been working on that muscle the more difficult it will be to lose it and the faster you will regain it by training after you've lost it. Think about it as a habit, you do something many times and it becomes automatic and an addiction, it's difficult to stop doing it, for your cells it's the same.


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What you say about the release of muscle contraction is called eccentric contraction. It is proved that when controlling this eccentric contraction is when more miofibrills are damaged and as we know, this is what we want to achieve to get the muscle gain. Also, as @Peter says, when doing the eccentric contraction slowly (between 2-4 seconds) you ...


1

To an extent. As long as you're progressing in volume it would be hard for you to lose mass when going back to low rep/heavy weight training. I enjoy doing both. So for instance training 5x5 on a monday. Doing high rep work on a wed and then heavy weight, low rep on friday.


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YES, both muscle size and strength need to be maintained. However, you need to provide much less stimulus to maintain said size/strength gains than you needed to grow them initially. E.g. going from a 5x5 protocol to a 3x10 or vice-versa shouldn't see any kind of strength or size loss, so long as you're keeping the same intensity and eating properly. That ...


3

Days off from lifting, known as "rest days", are designed to let your body heal from the damage you do during training. Oddly enough, the more progress you make in strength training the less frequently you can train at maximum because you get very good at damaging your body. Putting it another way, the cumulative exercise (a.k.a. damage) a trained athlete ...


4

Usually this would be called an active rest day, and is something that I find very effective. I lift 6 days a week then do cardio whether it be riding my bike, jogging, running, or soccer drills. I find it quite helpful. It gives your muscles time to recover but you are still getting your daily dose of exercise. As you said, it is important to avoid using ...



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