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9

I would recommend a balanced and proven strength training program. The typical office job tends to provide numerous posture issues and strains from being in awkward positions for hours at a time. Good strength training will simultaneously strengthen and provide flexibility across all your major muscle groups, including your shoulders, neck, and upper back. ...


7

I cant diagnose you but a doctor might be able to identify if you have any of the following: I think you may have Thoracic Kyphosis/Forward Head ("Computer Guy" Hunchback): Upper cross syndrome is another posture issue caused by sitting while hunching forward (at a computer, over books, etc). The pectorals and the upper back/next tend to be tight, while ...


7

This is very much an individual question, as everyone has different requirements and reacts in different ways to fluid and food intake when running. It's just very much trial and error to find what works for you. However, what you can do is start tracking your runs, time of day, how you feel, what you ate, things like that. Over time, you will get data such ...


5

The first routine is low on overall weekly volume in terms of sessions in the gym and I would recommend if you chose this route to achieve hypertrophy what you understand that as you develop into a intermediate/advanced lifter that the time you spend in the gym during these 3 session will increase to a significant amount. Whole-body programs are designed to ...


3

Psychological issues aside (as requested), there is the big, BIG issue of physiological restitution. You've probably heard of the muscle group rest period of 48-hours since both your layouts seem to follow it. But your central nervous system (CNS) is going to be taking a hit 6 days in a row if you follow the second routine. While your muscles may be ...


2

Time-under-Tension is when you are moving, holding and otherwise doing work to keep the weight in a particular position. Think of doing a slow bodyweight squat, this will get hard if you repeat it because your muscles are under a constant strain, building up lactic acid and creating a few micro-tears. This principle is why doing a plank works out your abs, ...


2

You've mentioned both strength and LBM development, and these aren't all that related as you might think. An untrained individual will have greater muscle growth simply due to the fact that they are untrained. As in, their body has never been introduced to this external stress and stimulus caused by weight training and as a result, it adapts to these new ...


2

I wanted to join the commentary because I too started having upper back problems around my shoulders and neck when I entered my 30s**. I spent a full year trying a number of different things including going to a chiropractor, seeing my doctor, and going to numerous physical therapy sessions before I finally found a regimen that worked for me. Here is what I ...


1

I used to have a lot of neck problems from playing the saxophone. Two things helped. Don't bend your neck to do your work, adjust your screen and your chair until you can sit comfortably. Take time to do this properly. Adjust and use the armrests. Read the ergonomic guides and believe them. Ask the fitness studio guy for exercises to help your special ...


1

Is 6 days better? Yes. You can bring more energy to each workout and get the same work done to higher quality which leads to better progress. Also you have more room for variation to keep you progressing. But you need to lay out the routine correctly. There are no black and white answers. Can you give an example of the routines? Ideas for setting it up ...


1

You could load up the bar on the Smith machine, put it on your traps like with squats (never directly on the cervical spine!) and do them like that. A wooden board, plates or step plate can be used to put the balls of your feet on to reach proper depth. However, at 180 kg you may find that the load on the spine and whole upper body could be too much. ...


1

Specific tempo advice for maximizing strength, power, hypertrophy and endurance will depend on: Your exercise of choice (sqauts for example require a much greater recovery time than curls) Your level of training (beginners and those who have been lifting for many years recover at very different speeds) Generally, I will say that strength and power ...


1

I agree with most of the above. But please remember to Enjoy life. There is no reason to live a long and healthy life if you spend all of it being worried about making it healthy or long enough. Live life for life's own sake, life is not a Travelling Salesman Problem to be solved. So, if I were to be so bold, I'd amend Neria's answer a little: Go ...



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