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5

Nothing inherently wrong in the math, just in the model you are using. As it turns out, Greg Nuckols just published an article on Muscle Math, which sheds some light on why it is simply not feasible in practice to go from 300x3 to 840 lbs in 1 year (52 weeks). Some of the major take-aways are: Recovery activities have a power law distribution (i.e. the ...


4

As far as I know, the fastest movements and possibly the biggest acceleration are due to eye saccades, that is rapid movements of the eye as it scans the environment. Those are involuntary and have to do with perception. Wikipedia quotes the speed at 900 degrees/second (2.5 revolutions, for comparison with ADAM). As for acceleration, "Unsupervised ...


3

Your math is fine. The problem is you're just plotting your current progress. From Aimee Avaya Everett: New people come on the scene, their lifts continuously go up week after week, and they are the fucking bomb! Their confidence is through the roof! Do we have the next World Champ? [They think,] 'At the rate I am PRing in my snatch and clean & jerk, ...


3

Is my friend, who lifts 3 times more weight than I do, stronger? He's stronger than you at certain things. There is no universal single benchmark for strength. Numerous things can be used: squats, snatches, atlas stones, deadlifts, overhead press, pulling a car up a hill, etc. Your body adapts to what you do it. Your friend doesn't concentrate on ...


1

I would try something like Couch to 5k or hiring a trainer at a gym. You need a lot of guidance. Progressing from not-fit to a serious routine takes a lot of knowledge and a willingness to pay for your mistakes in injury.


1

Walking and Weightlifting Walking is a fine starting point for overall fitness, and to combat the problems associated with sitting at a desk for long periods. If you're completely new, just about ANY sort of resistance training is going to get you results. Once you've been at it for a few dozen sessions, you can start looking into more complete lifting ...


1

My arm is ~84 cm long. Earlier this evening, I timed myself doing arm swings at 20 circles/(10 seconds). That's 2 revs/second. With a 84 cm radius, my fingertips were therefore moving 2*[2*pi*(0.84m)]/sec ~ 10 m/s. Centripetal acceleration = v^2/radius. (7.54m/s)^2/(0.6m) ~ 120 m/s^2 ==> 12 G. My fingertips were being accelerated back to my ...



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