Hot answers tagged

9

Do slow negatives, start at the top and lower yourself slowly, this is the way most people get strong enough to do their first, clean pull/chin-ups. If you have a rubber band to attach to the bar, that can work too.,


8

This is sort of a complicated question from a physiological point of view. Muscle is made of myocytes (muscle cells), which are made of a few things of interest in relation to your question. Let's look at a diagram: The myofibril (called out above) are the packs of fibers in the muscle, which are responsible for contraction of the tissue. They're ...


7

There's a very common misconception here. Many people think that certain types of exercise will give you one body shape or the other. The reasoning is (more or less explicitly), that since power lifters are bulky, working out like a power lifter will make you bulky, and since dancers are fit and lean, "working out" like a dancer will make you fit and lean. ...


7

"Beginner gains" is a useful abstraction for what I conjecture is an interrelated set of physiological processes. Part of it is the systemic hormonal response to the first time someone does resistance training, part of it is easy improvements to neurological efficiency (i.e. you get better at the movement, so can lift more weight independent of your ...


6

Overhead work does tend to be more difficult to progress in than anything else. First thing you'll need to understand is the concept of equivalent effort. It's one way that many lifter's track progress, and decide if that 8 RM (Rep Max) was really a better effort than last month's 5 RM. All of these are roughly equal effort to a 1 rep max: 95%, 2 reps ...


5

Frequency Can be used to describe how often a particular movement is performed. If Lifter A squats once per week and Lifter B squats twice per week, then Lifter B squats more frequently than Lifter A. Intensity Used to compare sub-maximal efforts to a person's max effort for a particular exercise. In terms of lifting this tends to be given as a percent of ...


5

Taking a couple weeks off won't hurt your strength and could actually be beneficial over the long run as it will give your body some really good rest. I like doing a small deficit when I have to take time off of lifting, you could expect to lose a few lbs over that time. Be aware if you do go on a deficit during your time off you will probably have to drop ...


5

Your first mistake was expecting progress after 1 day. Your second mistake was doing the same exercise two days in a row. After that, I can only guess about your form, but standing overhead press is usually something that doesn't come very naturally, so you will most likely have some mistakes there if you haven't recieved any guidance.


5

Most of the respected strength training programs focus on exactly that: strength. In general the rep ranges are your biggest lever to play with with strength vs hypertrophy vs endurance. There's also relationships between muscle cross-section size as it compares to strength. Boiled down, the idea is that 2 square inches of muscle can generate more force ...


4

Performing a proper two-hand kettlebell swing is a whole-body workout as opposed to isolating single muscles. However, the main muscles that go into swinging a bell are glutes, hamstrings, lower back + abs (core). What you should aim for in a swing is to send your hips back (similar to deadlift form) with the bell, and then drive your hips forward to get ...


4

Freeletics are great. I myself sadly cannot stand doing those exercises (tried, failed), some of us are just better suited to be gym-rats. As a beginner these exercises will have a great impact on you. The main point being that you are a still a beginner and that means you need some quick and consistent results to keep you hooked on exercising. Begginers ...


4

You know, it looks pretty damn decent. The program you are currently following is well and beyond sufficient for you to constantly improve as far as your strength goes. I'm sure you know that you'll improve on conditioning and lower your bodyfat at the same time and just a suggestion maybe add some sprints into the mix, not a requirement however, what you ...


4

Read Charles Bronson's book named Solitary Fitness Charlie Bronson has spent three decades in solitary confinement, and yet has stayed as fit as a fiddle, gaining several world strength and fitness records in the process. Now, in this no-nonsense guide to getting fit and staying fit, he reveals just how he's done it. You have time in your hand so it would ...


4

Apart from your general protein need, you need some to repair muscles after training, so your protein intake should be slightly increased. This website states a need of 1.2 to 1.4 gram per kg bodyweight. That is not much, the average western diet easily covers even the strength athletes protein need. So don't worry about it.


4

I'll preface this by saying this is purely my opinion based on many years of training and experience as a trainer. I, personally, would not perform “one more set with heavy weight stretching my pectorals as long as I can “ after 4 sets of regular flyes. Assuming hard work with heavy weights, your shoulders and pectoral muscles will be pretty exhausted. ...


3

A 1200 pound deadlift would be a world record in any category (raw/equipped etc), so yeah he's lying. There doesn't seem to be a world record in standing military press, but the highest numbers I'm finding is around 500 pounds.


3

Your bouldering training schedule should be dictated by your previous climbing years (that translates into how strong are your hands' tendons) and goals. If you are a beginner I suggest to have one day of rest between hard bouldering session otherwise it's easy to go too hard on your finger (tendons are slow to strengthen). After a couple of years (or if ...


3

Quite frankly, your best bet is to consult a physical therapist so as to avoid injury. Outside of that, one physical therapy site recommends the following: Avoid overstretching Avoid positions or activities involving extreme ranges of motion in the hips Strengthen muscles surrounding the hips, pelvis, spine, and knees (best to be advised by a physical ...


3

Extensive bodyweight exercises and repetition of their art for hours at a time is basically the answer. As noted by Dave above, Christopher Somner's writings are generally considered to be the fundamental word on it. His website can be found here. It's prohibitively expensive to get an actual copy of his seminal work, Building the Gymnastic Body, although ...


3

If you can perform 4 sets of 30 reps using a machine, it's time to Increase the weights on the machines. Performing 30 reps of any weight-based exercise isn't recommended as it doesn't really serve any useful purpose. Ditch the machines and use dumbbells and barbells. Using machines solely usually gives you the impression of being stronger than you ...


3

Regarding fat loss, I'll point you towards some info on how "abs are made in the kitchen" (ie: diet is the biggest factor) and strength training is superior to cardio for fat loss. You're not going to be able to use one of the truly kick ass strength training programs because they are all about barbells, primarily because of the compound nature. What I ...


3

Let's start with some basics: Dianabol is a known anabolic steroid, not a vitamin Creatine is not a steroid, nor does it function like one An excellent article at Examine.com explores the difference. Genetic Differences Even if your friend did not resort to using dianabol, there can be genetic differences that affect how quickly you can get good at the ...


3

Eric from Power Dojo states: The ratio that I give in my Ultimate MMA Strength and Conditioning Program is that you should be able to perform a Reverse barbell lunge at a minimum of 1/2 of your max Back squat, but I’d prefer you get that up to 2/3 your max Back squat. [...] basically you should be able to do a Reverse Barbell Lunge with at least your ...


3

Maybe I can help out a little. This kind of grip strength can be achieved by strengthening your forarms, wrists, thumbs, fingers and by learning to recrute more muscle as you do right now for opening a jar as example. There are three types of grip strength: The Crush Grip is the grip between your fingers and your palm—the one you use for shaking hands and ...


3

The best thing you can do, is to forget about trying to consciously tense your abs during daily activities. There is nothing inherently wrong with relaxing the stomach muscles, especially during normal activities. For example, consciously keeping your abdomen pulled in all the time can restrict basic bodily functions like breathing or digestion. If you ...


2

There doesn't appear to be anything out there that exactly meets your requirements eg. in, Who is Strongest? Adjusting Lifting Performance for Differences in Body Weight, Dan Cleather, MA, ASCC, CSCS it states: despite the wide use of the Wilks formula, it has never been fully supported by published data. An alternative method for comparing the ...


2

I sadly cannot find any resources explaining the coefficients. My best guess is that it is interpolated using a large amount of data from official powerlifting events, and fitted using some "best fit" approach like the Method of Least Squares. This would explain where the coefficients come from. The roots of the quintic polynomial would of course cause an ...


2

If we're controlling for bodyfat and muscle strength per unit size, then the only downside to adding as much muscle as possible is the square-cube law. (And the limits of human digestive capability, I suppose.) This is, of course, absurd: no athlete (even in a non-weight-class sport) simply chooses to continue adding muscle mass ad infinitum. The disconnect ...


2

The Problem 5kg is waaaaaay too much to add in a single jump for most lifts for most people after the very beginner stages. It's appropriate sometimes, but many times it's too significant an increase to be ready for the higher weight with good form. Some Solutions Fractional or otherwise smaller plates. Two 2.5kg plates should not be the smallest thing ...


2

Your physical therapist would probably be the best one to answer that question. Because there are different causes of kyphosis, the results of doing your corrective exercises may very well depend on the cause. If the cause of your kyphosis is postural, then strengthening the upper back and scapular muscles while adding flexibility to the shortened muscles ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible