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27

Stop Making Excuses "I have six [to] eight years of trial-and-error evidence to show that I am incapable of building strength to any measurable degree from any form of exercise." Either you have a serious medical issue or I call bullshit. I bet the reason you're not getting results is that you "have [never] been satisfied with results from any workout ...


7

Forward head posture (called gravity induced kyphosis) is pretty common nowadays. The first thing you should do is begin stretching your neck with an exercise called neck retraction: You'll be amazed at how great this exercise feels. If you've been stuck in forward head posture for a long time, you'll feel as though your entire upper spine is waking up. ...


7

Strength training builds muscle. In other words, the forcible contraction of your muscles against resistance is what stimulates them to get stronger or more firm. While stretching has a role, it's not to build or tone muscle. NOTE: the amount of body fat you have can accentuate or hide muscularity, so a certain amount of "toning" is done in the kitchen. ...


6

Question 1: Does hypertrophy training assist for a greater eventual neural output? Hypertrophy training probably does not help to increase neural drive. That is because of the anatomical properties of the muscles. Muscle fibers are innervated in groups, called motor units, by a single motor neuron (above figure shows a single motor unit). By doing ...


6

Rule #1: keep it simple Rule #2: make a plan and stick with it (at least for 2-3 months) Rule #3: don't hurt yourself I've been using a combination of my home gym and the local YMCA for many years AND actually get more of a workout at home. I tend to go to the Y for more 'social' aspects. Given that, I think you need to include some 'social' aspects to ...


6

I'd go with either a dumbbell set or a squat rack and barbell. Those give the most bang for your buck. Free weights are manageable. You can do it. Research basic strength programs. A good sign that you've accidentally found a bodybuilding program (which you don't want) is if you're doing three variations of the same movement (EZ-bar curl...and a ...


6

Jim Wendler, a big strong weight lifter, says this: I believe [high schoolers] should be at least to do the following before they even lift weights; 50 push-ups with proper form (no A-Frame or saggy ass) 10 strict pull-ups 100 sit-ups 25 parallel dips Be able to hold various bridging positions for at least 30 seconds. Have some kind of ...


6

There are several methods of increasing grip strength, and some of the principles that work the best you should already be familiar with due to the bodybuilding background. First, let's look at what causes grip to fail: Sweat. The sweatier your hands, the more the bar wants to slip out of them. Effective bar thickness. The thicker your bar, the tougher it ...


5

Jim Bathurst, known for his web site Beast Skills, says in his human flag tutorial: If you can do several full range handstand pushups against the wall, then you’re well on your way to getting the flag. Overcoming Gravity, a popular book on gymnastic training for adults, has a chart comparing the difficulty of various skills. In the chart, a full human ...


5

Right now, you're underweight, so the first advice has to be that you should eat more. For this you might want to track everything you eat for a week or two, to find out how much you do eat right now. From there, you will most likely want to increase your calorie consumption to provide a caloric surplus (depending on what work/sports you do that could be ...


5

"Programs? I don't follow any, but any decent regimen of training should increase strength. People got stronger before "strength programs" existed, so I will not consider any." Welp, have fun then! If you refuse to train in a successful manner then I expect you will keep seeing the results you have been seeing.


5

If that's your whole diet, then that's the reason you are having problems. The diet is very unbalanced, and does not support your desire to get strong and have a great physique. Eat enough Protein: 1.8g/kg body weight. If you are vegetarian, you'll have to get creative. Oats and quinoa have a decent amount of protein in them. If you can eat meat and ...


5

My nutrition is standard low carb diet (about 40% protein / 60% fats, I eat cake/sweets max 2 times a week no more than 100g). Ding ding ding! We've found the culprit. Your body relies on carbohydrate for most of its energy. If you go low-carb, you're relying on transitioning from using carbs to ketosis, where you're using fats. Many people report ...


5

When I was coached for the deadlift, I was advised that the first inch is the most important, followed by the distance up to the knee line. Past that you're generally in the clear. That's anecdotal, but it's been true for me and most people I've talked to. Answering your question showed me that at (or around) that point, the quads become less dominant and ...


5

Nothing inherently wrong in the math, just in the model you are using. As it turns out, Greg Nuckols just published an article on Muscle Math, which sheds some light on why it is simply not feasible in practice to go from 300x3 to 840 lbs in 1 year (52 weeks). Some of the major take-aways are: Recovery activities have a power law distribution (i.e. the ...


4

As far as I know, the fastest movements and possibly the biggest acceleration are due to eye saccades, that is rapid movements of the eye as it scans the environment. Those are involuntary and have to do with perception. Wikipedia quotes the speed at 900 degrees/second (2.5 revolutions, for comparison with ADAM). As for acceleration, "Unsupervised ...


4

Given your context (child, disabilities, beginner), I would aim for kettlebell(s) combined with focused, timeboxed workout routines, e.g. tabatas A kettlebell is simple, robust and can be used for a variety of functional exercises that match your need in terms of a relatively heavy disabled child. No moving parts, can be left outside and inexpensive ...


4

Deload and rest weeks are two very different ways of giving your body, and your central nervous system (henceforth CNS) some time-out. In your example you'd go pretty much all out on 3 weeks out of 4. So naturally, you'd want to cut yourself some slack during the fourth week, so the CNS doesn't break down and you don't go into overtraining (joints will ...


4

Wendler 5/3/1 is designed around certain assumptions, and until you know how your body responds to the stimulus that the program provides you really don't have a foundation of knowledge of what the program isn't doing for you. There's already a great deal of flexibility in the program, but training 7 days a week is not within those constraints. Wendler ...


4

What you're looking for are strength or fitness standards. Generally these fall into two broad groups: Strength-biased evaluations, which will generally look at things like your back squat, deadlift, bench and overhead press, and maybe chin-ups. Many examples of this will delve into evaluating power or athleticism by including exercises like the Olympic ...


4

The answer is "sure". You have a given capacity - based on training - to buffer lactic acid out of your system. To do so requires oxygen. If you are running at a rate that generates lactic acid faster than you can buffer it out, you will accumulate it, and after a while, you'll have to slow down. When your aerobic system cleans up enough of the lactic ...


4

Keep in mind lactic acid generation itself is actually a good thing - it's just directly correlated with other fatiguing mechanisms. Lactic acid (via the "lactate shuttle") allows for eventual further extraction of ATP via aerobic mechanisms. When you do hard cardio, you generate ATP anaerobically, which produces lactate as by product of breaking down ...


4

Lifting gloves get in the way and make your job harder. I recommend going without. Chalk helps enormously to prevent sweat from making the bar hard to grip. Buy a block of rock climber's chalk for a buck. Before each set, use the chalk to "paint" your fingers and the inside of your palm where it meets your fingers. Rub your hands together to work it into ...


3

As a 50+ athlete, I can tell you that gains are still possible. However, they are harder to achieve and less frequent. It's just part of the aging process. That doesn't mean you can't train with gains in mind. You just need to train smarter.


3

I'm going to caveat this answer by informing you I am not a physical therapist. The routine I'm linking to is from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: Rotator Cuff Shoulder Conditioning Program. Some high points are: The rotator cuff needs to heal. If your client has pain dealing with any of the exercises outlined, don't do them. Strengthening ...


3

They are both correct, however, the way they are stated is the source of confusion. 1) There is no correlation between the number of fibers and the energy system used. There is actually an exogenous explanation. The increased recruitment of muscle fibers occurs due to an increase in tension of the muscle. I.e. the force production is increased. When you are ...


3

It's easy to blame genetics, when the truth of the matter is the work you were doing wasn't the right kind of work for your goals. The truth is nothing comes easy to everyone. While genetics are a factor, the biggest limiting factors really don't have much to do with that. SAID Principle Exercise is subject to the SAID principle, or Specific Adaptations ...


3

None of the exercise you do or the equipment you use matters for acquiring a "ripped" body. A ripped body is just a body that has a low percentage of body fat. You can be ripped but still be emaciated or malnourished. Of course, I am just illustrating a point to make my initial claim more clear. If you wish to lose weight you can do so by creating a caloric ...


3

I'm a big fan of freeweights, but I recently picked up a set of resistance bands from Amazon and I have been very impressed. You can get up to 200 pounds of resistance for very low cost. What got me interested in looking at resistance bands is their use by trainers of professional athletes. I have seen videos on youtube of football players, who weigh far ...


3

You say you're stuck at your lat-pulldown, but you want to be able to do chinups. Well, lat-pulldowns don't make good pull ups, pull ups do. So let's just take a look at the bigger picture and concentrate on your upper back instead of just lats. With that said here are some ideas on how to overcome your plateau: Plan for a dedicated 'upper back day' and do ...



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