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If you're seeing uneven wear, it is worthwhile seeing a doctor. It's not out of the question for there to be a fundamental unevenness. I had a mild case of undiagnosed scoliosis as a child and, possibly as a result, my arms are slightly different lengths, which means I have to modify my bench-press and push-up motions slightly. I do not advise seeing a ...


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Ditch the cables and machines and pick up a barbell. Squat, press, bench and deadlift should suffice in developing your whole body. These big compound movements (if used with good form) should help your body account for imbalance. Unilateral: For example, my left arm is weak so I do a set to failure of bicep curls on my left arm first, counting the reps. I ...


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First of all, given we don't know much about the exact situation - have in mind there could be an underlying medical condition so you should consult a doctor if you have any such doubt. That being said - having more strength on your right side, especially in the beginning is not unlikely. Your strength is not solely determined by your muscle shape and size ...


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Late to the party, but as per James's answer, there's a good chance this is tied to your tendons. You may have some variety of golfer's elbow. You mention that you were using dumbbells. One of the easy ways to inflame that tendon is putting it under stress while gripping something tightly, especially if you curl your wrist. Which, as you might guess, is ...


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To get strong, lift heavy By constantly moving on you elevate your heart rate and fatigue takes over. Don't think of your muscles getting fatigue but instead think of your whole body. For example, deadlift and bench press use completely different muscle groups but you won't find anyone going to do a set of heavy deadlifts after a heavy bench set. What you ...


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Others have already pointed out the obvious paradox. I disagree with some of the answers (esp. regarding the horse riding). I thought I'd add my opinion: Horse riding should build muscle because the core stabilization and leg muscles are used a lot while you try to stay on the horse and giving the horse signals by pressing together your legs etc. If this ...


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Dieting is sort of like a passive workout in that you get more physically fit by not doing something -- ie, not eating. After I lost 100+ lbs by by tweaking my diet, physical activity suddenly became fun. Now I look forward to going to the gym to lift weights. Beyond that, if you live a sedentary lifestyle like I do (being a software developer) I would ...


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As the others have indicated, the best return on exercise involves concerted effort, pushing yourself to the limit. That said, casual exercise can also be worthwhile, at least for the purpose of staying relatively healthy. It's not "lying in bed and doing nothing", but it's also not "8x5 strong-lifts of maximum weight" or even "10 push-ups and 10 pull-ups ...


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Assuming you have no physical limitations, your problem seems to be a lack of motivation. Rather than doing things you don’t like, you should find an activity that can keep your interest for a minimum of twenty minutes or more. Setting achievable goals may help with improving motivation. Ask yourself, “What do I want out of exercise?”. Once you’ve ...


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Your problem A passive way of working out sounds like a paradox. If you want to become stronger, you need to exert your muscles. And exertion of the muscles is an "activity", which is an antonym to "passivity". If you want to get in shape by lying in your bed, you'll be disappointed. In the end, the problem isn't that you're lazy. Most of us are. But we ...


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I'm fighting with this problem too. In front of a computer 12 hours / 7 days of week / round year. You could take my way. As you have mentioned: hit the weight room 5 or 6 days a week The background theory of my way: Why does neck hurts? Muscles too light to keep it properly straight. Because of lack of physical job. I'm not a hard worker, not a red-...


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My top three guesses: You don't squat right. You go down to about 60 degrees and call it a rep. When you deadlift you are beyond the point where your squat ends. You haven't done enough deadlifts. It will take a few months of doing a lift before your helper muscles adjust. A person never doing deadlifts can't just naturally deadlift more if they haven'...


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For starters, bench is going to exhaust you less because less muscle is being used. This means it makes a smaller metabolic impact. Also, if your deadlift is lower than your squat it isn't the end of the world, it just means you have a strength imbalance. Deadlifts can exhaust you faster for many reasons. It could be form issues, it could be that you are ...


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Some study has shown that if you do both heavy with few repetitions and lighter with higher repetitions, the muscles grow more than doing just one kind of workout. Also variations in sets can be used, like stripping weights lighter, then doing more reps. You should start with warm up movements. That can contain various exercises and stretching. Some people ...


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What exactly do you mean by "wise"? It has its ups and downs depending on what your goals are. If your goal is weight/fat loss then yes it is fine. You will burn through your glycogen stores via weights and most of the calories you burn via cardio will have to come from fat. If your goal is strength, it's not the best. It's been shown that there is a ...


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YES The weights they use in those videos are still geared towards "cardio with resistance". IT is fine to mix both, "les mills body pump classes" do exactly this and have been effective for people wishing to increase their cardio activity.


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There is a problem with mixing them if you are going above 50-60% max. Your tendons get stretched during cardio. When you lift you want them tight. This can lead to numerous injuries but I would be most concerned about my knees. I am sure someone can give you a lengthy explanation but for the most part leave your cardio to after weights.


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Go to a proper Registered Massage Therapist instead of someone at a nail salon. Often they will be covered by extended medical (in the same category as physios probably) and they actually know what to do to help with longer term relief. Additionally, THEY will be able to tell you what exercises and stretches to do to release tension and perhaps improve ...


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You can easily fix your neck problems by "HOLISTIC" methods, which include massage, chiropractic, rei-ki, osteopathy, etc ... You DON'T want (or need) surgery or pills (especially pain-killers !!), or other pharmaceutical drugs. They will only upset your body-chemistry and aggravate the problem !! Instead of drugs or pills, try herbal teas. They are very-...


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"mid-30s now", "Gone are the days".... Your body has a long way to go (hopefully). It is a good idea to make the time now to set up an exercise/recreational program that increases your chances for a healthy, long-term active lifestyle. Your neck is a warning sign, the "canary in the coal mine", pointing to more musculo-skeletal problems as you age. "...


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I wanted to join the commentary because I too started having upper back problems around my shoulders and neck when I entered my 30s**. I spent a full year trying a number of different things including going to a chiropractor, seeing my doctor, and going to numerous physical therapy sessions before I finally found a regimen that worked for me. Here is what I ...


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I used to have a lot of neck problems from playing the saxophone. Two things helped. Don't bend your neck to do your work, adjust your screen and your chair until you can sit comfortably. Take time to do this properly. Adjust and use the armrests. Read the ergonomic guides and believe them. Ask the fitness studio guy for exercises to help your special ...


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I cant diagnose you but a doctor might be able to identify if you have any of the following: I think you may have Thoracic Kyphosis/Forward Head ("Computer Guy" Hunchback): Upper cross syndrome is another posture issue caused by sitting while hunching forward (at a computer, over books, etc). The pectorals and the upper back/next tend to be tight, while ...


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I would recommend a balanced and proven strength training program. The typical office job tends to provide numerous posture issues and strains from being in awkward positions for hours at a time. Good strength training will simultaneously strengthen and provide flexibility across all your major muscle groups, including your shoulders, neck, and upper back. ...



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