New answers tagged

1

Is 6 days better? Yes. You can bring more energy to each workout and get the same work done to higher quality which leads to better progress. Also you have more room for variation to keep you progressing. But you need to lay out the routine correctly. There are no black and white answers. Can you give an example of the routines? Ideas for setting it up ...


5

The first routine is low on overall weekly volume in terms of sessions in the gym and I would recommend if you chose this route to achieve hypertrophy what you understand that as you develop into a intermediate/advanced lifter that the time you spend in the gym during these 3 session will increase to a significant amount. Whole-body programs are designed to ...


3

Psychological issues aside (as requested), there is the big, BIG issue of physiological restitution. You've probably heard of the muscle group rest period of 48-hours since both your layouts seem to follow it. But your central nervous system (CNS) is going to be taking a hit 6 days in a row if you follow the second routine. While your muscles may be ...


0

All studies what I have found (mentioned in other answers) are using only the world records to validate the Wilks formula. What does not really make sense for the purpose how it is used today (for comparison of ordinary lifters at competitions). See the following post about this issue: http://physical-preparedness.rhcloud.com/view/validation-wilks-...


2

You've mentioned both strength and LBM development, and these aren't all that related as you might think. An untrained individual will have greater muscle growth simply due to the fact that they are untrained. As in, their body has never been introduced to this external stress and stimulus caused by weight training and as a result, it adapts to these new ...


0

First, I want to make sure you're not making the same mistakes that most people make when it comes to calves. Doing calf specific work won't necessarily make your calves bigger, unless your chemically enhanced via steroids. When you're a natural lifter, most of your muscle growth (except for when you first start lifting weights for a few months) will happen ...


0

Great question. Before you can understand the answer, you need to understand some of the principles involved in how "tempo" relates to performance. Performance relating to either hypertrophy and endurance or power/strength. It is generally well known and accepted that to invoke proper hypertrophy, you need to introduce enough stimulus to the muscle to ...


1

You could load up the bar on the Smith machine, put it on your traps like with squats (never directly on the cervical spine!) and do them like that. A wooden board, plates or step plate can be used to put the balls of your feet on to reach proper depth. However, at 180 kg you may find that the load on the spine and whole upper body could be too much. ...


2

Time-under-Tension is when you are moving, holding and otherwise doing work to keep the weight in a particular position. Think of doing a slow bodyweight squat, this will get hard if you repeat it because your muscles are under a constant strain, building up lactic acid and creating a few micro-tears. This principle is why doing a plank works out your abs, ...


1

Specific tempo advice for maximizing strength, power, hypertrophy and endurance will depend on: Your exercise of choice (sqauts for example require a much greater recovery time than curls) Your level of training (beginners and those who have been lifting for many years recover at very different speeds) Generally, I will say that strength and power ...


7

This is very much an individual question, as everyone has different requirements and reacts in different ways to fluid and food intake when running. It's just very much trial and error to find what works for you. However, what you can do is start tracking your runs, time of day, how you feel, what you ate, things like that. Over time, you will get data such ...


1

I agree with most of the above. But please remember to Enjoy life. There is no reason to live a long and healthy life if you spend all of it being worried about making it healthy or long enough. Live life for life's own sake, life is not a Travelling Salesman Problem to be solved. So, if I were to be so bold, I'd amend Neria's answer a little: Go ...


0

I agree with Neria answer, but he missed one crucial point: Cold showers (cold exposure in general) has immunostimulating effects. You can see for example this study http://jap.physiology.org/content/87/2/699.short The cold showering is often overlooked, because it is way too painful in comparison with exercise and diet.


5

Though it's a very general question, here's a few guidelines I follow for a healthy life: Go active. The Western culture have become way too inactive, a way of life our body is not accustomed to. Especially if you spend hours in a deskjob, make sure you exercise or perform some jogging on daily basis. Saying that, you shouldn't go hard & heavy everyday....


1

So you want something universal, with validations, easily measurable and repeatable as well as measuring endurance and strength. Why not just use standard military training fitness tests? A basic one is the US Army Physical Fitness test, which includes pushups, situps, and a 2-mile run. http://usmilitary.about.com/od/army/a/afpt.htm You can also look at ...



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