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-1

Depends, yes, it has to be mantained. The longer you have been working on that muscle the more difficult it will be to lose it and the faster you will regain it by training after you've lost it. Think about it as a habit, you do something many times and it becomes automatic and an addiction, it's difficult to stop doing it, for your cells it's the same.


1

To an extent. As long as you're progressing in volume it would be hard for you to lose mass when going back to low rep/heavy weight training. I enjoy doing both. So for instance training 5x5 on a monday. Doing high rep work on a wed and then heavy weight, low rep on friday.


3

YES, both muscle size and strength need to be maintained. However, you need to provide much less stimulus to maintain said size/strength gains than you needed to grow them initially. E.g. going from a 5x5 protocol to a 3x10 or vice-versa shouldn't see any kind of strength or size loss, so long as you're keeping the same intensity and eating properly. That ...


2

I started 5x5 in May 2014, and the workouts have lengthened to 1.5--2 hours depending on which workout I'm on (shorter for Deadlift day). For reference, my current lifts: Squat: 240 Bench: 160 OH Press: 95 Deadlift: 285 I switched to 3x5 on squats on 10/1. I will be 62 in December. I've deloaded three times on squats, 4 times on OH press, but not on ...


2

It's a little hard to write this out, but when benching "power lifter style", I usually approach like this: Try to drive your shoulder blades into the bench. You want lots of positive and balanced contact between your upper back and the pad. You will be on the toes / balls of your feet, which helps to arch your back. Your feet will be nearly under your ...


5

When I was coached for the deadlift, I was advised that the first inch is the most important, followed by the distance up to the knee line. Past that you're generally in the clear. That's anecdotal, but it's been true for me and most people I've talked to. Answering your question showed me that at (or around) that point, the quads become less dominant and ...


2

Adding 5% weight (rounding-up to the nearest 5 kilos) every 8 weeks of training to any given lift for any given rep-range is a reasonable goal. 10% would be aggressive, but do-able. These numbers assume you're past the novice/untrained stage of gains. A couple other bits of unsolicited advice: 1.) Don't forget that weighted pull-ups is a good way to ...


2

There are strength standards out there that define the progression from untrained to novice to intermediate to advanced to elite. Just as an example, at your body weight your squat needs to go up to 113 kilos (1RM) to hit intermediate. You'll need to do the conversion to kilos, but these give pretty clear numbers on what you should be able to do. Even ...


0

Your question is very subjective. The short answer is, there is no magic formula for setting goals. However, there are guidelines. Try to be realistic. For example, if at the moment, you can't bench press 300 lbs, don't set that as a goal. Rather, set the goal to be increasing the amount you can currently lift. Sometimes, goals have nothing to do with ...


2

Stretching doesn't build muscle. But it does have an important effect on your muscles that makes it useful both post workout and after any period of being still (sitting, sleeping, etc.). The muscle spindles are accustomed being at a "resting length". Say, if you sit in a chair for hours on end, your hamstrings become accustomed to being shortened. The ...


0

If you wanted to continue with push up/pull up's also, a lot of people have found gains supplementing their normal workout routines with a PLP routine. Starting at 10 reps each, do your push ups, lunge, pull ups, and each day increment the number of reps by one. So "Day One" do 10 pushups, 10 pull ups, 10 lunges (each leg), "Day Two" do 11 of each, "Day ...


1

I ran ambulances for a period, and also spent 3 years working primary ambulance response in an Air Force ER. The other answers are good but kind of need to be all combined, since for first responder type of ambulance work, the correct answer is that you need an overall body weightlifting and conditioning program. During a normal year, and depending on ...


0

If you want definition in your biceps, you need to train them like a body builder would: lots of isolation work, moderate to high rep range, and lots of volume. Personally I can't stand training that way and although I don't have studies in front of me to prove it, anecdotal I know it causes a lot of injuries. Isolation work is a terrific way to develop ...



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