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8

I've read that I should do warm-up before running and stretch after running. Is that correct? Yes. Do that. Warm up by running slowly and gradually increasing the pace, or with dynamic stretching movements like lunges, air squats, leg swings, running sideways or backwards, swinging the arms, and trunk rotations.


7

Strength training builds muscle. In other words, the forcible contraction of your muscles against resistance is what stimulates them to get stronger or more firm. While stretching has a role, it's not to build or tone muscle. NOTE: the amount of body fat you have can accentuate or hide muscularity, so a certain amount of "toning" is done in the kitchen. ...


4

When you have reached a certain point of stretching a muscle, it will start to tense because of the stretch reflex. Stop at the first sign of muscle tension and stay there until you can relax, and the tension and discomfort is completely gone. Focusing on slow, smooth breathing helps. Once relaxed, you can go further into the stretch until you feel tension ...


4

The type of stretching that involves "bouncing" or lunging in a repeated pattern is called ballistic stretching. While there are a few, very limited uses, it has been contraindicated as a stretching method for many years. Every tendon (structure that connects muscle to bone) has what is known as a stretch reflex, that when triggered, causes the muscle ...


3

You are basically looking at the difference between static stretching, which is the traditional "sit, reach and hold" type that everyone is familiar with, and dynamic stretching, which is movement gradually increasing in amplitude that mimics the activity about to be done. What Dave and Michael are suggesting is dynamic stretching. Absolutely do this if you ...


3

Good question- according to the American College of Sports Medicine, a good warm up will get your heart rate to about 50-60% of maximum. This increase in HR will increase blood flow to skeletal muscle and joints (and to address your question in the comments, if you are doing almost any kind of warm up, that should put your joints through plenty of ROM... ...


3

First of all, if your fingers are constantly under stress and they are not recovering properly, this can lead to nerve damage in the wrist and elbow which is known as a repetitive stress injury. Much of your 'finger' strength in rock-climbing and tennis is generated by your forearm. So increasing forearm strength will increase the strength of your fingers. ...


3

You would probably benefit from having a physical therapist's or chiropractic evaluation. If you prefer to try to figure it out on your own search the site for piriformis for more information. Since you've identified the bumps as the PSISs, and you reproduce your pain by rotating your foot (actually the hip into internal or medial rotation), look at the ...


3

The ankle is a gliding joint and only really operates along 2 axes of movement. This limits your options for movement. Ultimately, the stretch you want to do is determined by what muscles you want to stretch. If you want to stretch the muscles in the inferior aspect of your foot (sole), you're options are pretty much limited to dorsiflexion (pointing your ...


3

If you have not stopped growing, then you may add some additional height. However, the only real way to tell this is to have x-rays done of your growth plates. If they have closed, then you will not be able to naturally add height. Stretching and yoga may help the slow shrinking that everyone goes through as the spinal cartilage and discs slowly compress ...


3

Because you are risking a hamstring tear and/or lower back injury, for little or no gain. Both are very painful and take a long time (months) to recover. First of all, as others have pointed out, you should not do ballistic stretching. In addition, you should always keep your spine straight when stretching the hamstrings. When you reach the limits of your ...


3

I don't believe that there is a universal list of stretches, but there are certainly guides out there. I'm personally found of Craig Ramsay's Anatomy of Stretching which has both an hour-long comprehensive set of stretches and a 15 minute essentials one, the latter of which also comes on a poster that comes with the book.


2

Cycling has been shown to shorten the rectus femoris. This happens because its range of motion is smaller than in for example running. The same thing happens to any muscle that is used across a shorter range of motion, so I presume that the exact same thing happens to the hamstring. There is another factor that plays a role there as well. The hamstring has ...


2

I will add some cues to Larissa's. When you are in the hole (the bottom position of the squat) don't strain your neck by looking up and leading with the head when rising to the standing position. Lead with your chest, not your head. This will help you maintain your upright position and mitigate the tendency of your butt rising faster than you chest when ...


2

The best stretch I've found for the posterior chain (touching your toes) is a dynamic stretch called the flexibility rollover or half reverse roll. It's fun and really gets you deep into the stretch. You'll be able to touch your toes in no time. Here's a video of the stretch in action (another video here). Starting position: Ending position:


2

Deep squats performed properly with decent weight will open up your hips. Your squat stance ends up being wide, and the weight causes your "hip" muscles (hamstrings, adductors, etc) to get pulled on like a rubber band, which stretches them. Back squats really are just that magical.


2

So the "shin" muscle everybody usually refers to is the anterior tibialis. Here are some stretches: http://walking.about.com/od/stretching/a/shinstretch.htm http://healthyliving.azcentral.com/stretch-anterior-tibialis-muscle-8489.html


2

Stretching doesn't build muscle. But it does have an important effect on your muscles that makes it useful both post workout and after any period of being still (sitting, sleeping, etc.). The muscle spindles are accustomed being at a "resting length". Say, if you sit in a chair for hours on end, your hamstrings become accustomed to being shortened. The ...


2

I asked about this on Reddit. Ballet dancers call your ability to rotate your hips like this "turnout". Suggestions for improving your turnout include: The frog stretch (there are many variations of this by the same name, pick your poison) Lying clam shells with a band to strengthen your external hip rotators This site describes an exercise from the ...


2

Focus on performing a dynamic warm up first. It is involves activating the working muscles and taking them through a full range of motion. Running with high knees, jumping jacks, mountain climbers, duck unders. These are a lot more effective than static stretching.


2

It is not true. It is not necessary to stretch your arms after a run. Out of all the physical interventions we utilize today, stretching has the least amount of evidence behind it. This is secondary not only to our poor understanding of the mechanism through which a muscle may or may not be lengthened, but also our generally poor in vitro measurement ...


2

Warming up is performed before a performance or practice. Athletes, singers, actors and others warm up before stressing their muscles.A warm up generally consists of a gradual increase in intensity in physical activity.So WARM UP is ALWAYS DONE BEFORE WORK OUT. On the other hand Stretching is a form of physical exercise in which a specific muscle or tendon ...


2

This happened to me when I started doing vigorous yoga again after an extended period of absence. My flexor muscles would cramp in simple things like child pose, but my base foot would always cramp during balance postures. It went away after a few weeks, in combination with the exercise and corrective measures. My primary training is as a massage therapist ...


2

You're describing two different types if stretching: ballistic, when you push with momentum, and static, when you push slower and hold the stretch steady for 30 seconds or more. Static is safer because you are much less likely to push too far when you know you're going to have to deal with the pain for the next 30 seconds or more. With ballistic, there is ...


1

There is something called a hollow position: http://maxwellsc.com/maxwellsc2/images/pro-cert-04.jpg This should be your position while doing pullups. Bracing your abs and contracting your glutes would probably end your pain.


1

Generally the hamstrings are the biggest restriction in bending to touch your toes, but essentially anything on the back side of the body can restrict the motion of bending forward. A short achilles tendon, tight gastroc/soleus muscles, tight back extensors etc. can all add to limitation in forward bend. Stretching: To stretch the gastroc and soleus ...


1

Marty Liquori, in his 1982 book Real Running, discusses both warming up and stretching. He says that stretching is "overrated, period," except in the case of an injury area. This was at least a view held by many elite distance runners at the time of the book's publication. But Liquori does stress the importance of warming up before a run. Even an elite ...


1

I know that my most frequent running injury was my right hip. Never had a problem with my left side at all. I think you usually end up injuring one side early in life, then compensate or lose flexibility somehow, then start developing imbalances. I'm a huge barbell fan, but bodyweight single-left stuff is awesome for identifying imbalances. I would imagine ...


1

You might want to ask a trainer or physical therapist type person. Even just asking a personal trainer for 30 seconds of free advice in a gym would probably be fine. I'll hit those guys up sometimes when I need someone to check my form. Generally when you feel pain in your knee during a stretch it's because you're performing it incorrectly. Some very ...


1

I searched some more and found this post by Mark Lauren, the author of YAYOG, himself (emphasis mine): There are key components that an effective workout should contain. Among these is a proper warm-up.The intent of a warm-up is to prepare the body for the physical activity that is about to follow. [...] The cool-down is often neglected despite its ...



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