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8

I've read that I should do warm-up before running and stretch after running. Is that correct? Yes. Do that. Warm up by running slowly and gradually increasing the pace, or with dynamic stretching movements like lunges, air squats, leg swings, running sideways or backwards, swinging the arms, and trunk rotations.


7

Strength training builds muscle. In other words, the forcible contraction of your muscles against resistance is what stimulates them to get stronger or more firm. While stretching has a role, it's not to build or tone muscle. NOTE: the amount of body fat you have can accentuate or hide muscularity, so a certain amount of "toning" is done in the kitchen. ...


5

Check out Limber 11 by a guy called Joe DeFranco. It's a few exercises/stretches which really helped me with my squat form. I used to have pain in the front of my hip when squatting but I started doing this 3 times a week and I noticed improvements after only a few days. Your lower back will also thank you for doing this. Some of the exercises require a bit ...


4

When you have reached a certain point of stretching a muscle, it will start to tense because of the stretch reflex. Stop at the first sign of muscle tension and stay there until you can relax, and the tension and discomfort is completely gone. Focusing on slow, smooth breathing helps. Once relaxed, you can go further into the stretch until you feel tension ...


4

The type of stretching that involves "bouncing" or lunging in a repeated pattern is called ballistic stretching. While there are a few, very limited uses, it has been contraindicated as a stretching method for many years. Every tendon (structure that connects muscle to bone) has what is known as a stretch reflex, that when triggered, causes the muscle ...


4

First, a point on definitions: Stretching - To lengthen a muscle. (Sit ups would not be considered stretching.) Strengthening - To contract a muscle against resistance. Cardio - Any exercise to raise your heart rate. All I can do for activity now is to lie down and come up and touch my toes without moving my knees. Actually, you have a lot of ...


3

I roll my eyes a little bit at "core" exercises, because your body works as a full whole so if you're doing proper full body exercises your "core" (which isn't some agreed-upon anatomical term) will not only be trained, but will be trained proportionately. This is a huge deal and can't be overstated: a lot of training is down right dangerous and counter ...


3

Because you are risking a hamstring tear and/or lower back injury, for little or no gain. Both are very painful and take a long time (months) to recover. First of all, as others have pointed out, you should not do ballistic stretching. In addition, you should always keep your spine straight when stretching the hamstrings. When you reach the limits of your ...


3

I don't believe that there is a universal list of stretches, but there are certainly guides out there. I'm personally found of Craig Ramsay's Anatomy of Stretching which has both an hour-long comprehensive set of stretches and a 15 minute essentials one, the latter of which also comes on a poster that comes with the book.


3

If you have not stopped growing, then you may add some additional height. However, the only real way to tell this is to have x-rays done of your growth plates. If they have closed, then you will not be able to naturally add height. Stretching and yoga may help the slow shrinking that everyone goes through as the spinal cartilage and discs slowly compress ...


3

You are basically looking at the difference between static stretching, which is the traditional "sit, reach and hold" type that everyone is familiar with, and dynamic stretching, which is movement gradually increasing in amplitude that mimics the activity about to be done. What Dave and Michael are suggesting is dynamic stretching. Absolutely do this if you ...


3

Deep squats performed properly with decent weight will open up your hips. Your squat stance ends up being wide, and the weight causes your "hip" muscles (hamstrings, adductors, etc) to get pulled on like a rubber band, which stretches them. Back squats really are just that magical.


3

When the upper outer front part of my leg feels tight or painful during squats, I find the best results from stretching my glutes. Stretches like yoga's pigeon pose: ...or pushing my knees out from a deep 3rd world squat: ...seem to help the most. Foam rolling the area that actually hurts can help too.


3

Quite frankly, your best bet is to consult a physical therapist so as to avoid injury. Outside of that, one physical therapy site recommends the following: Avoid overstretching Avoid positions or activities involving extreme ranges of motion in the hips Strengthen muscles surrounding the hips, pelvis, spine, and knees (best to be advised by a physical ...


3

I have no strength or stretching exercises for this purpose, but I do see this: I have been spending one afternoon a week practicing cartwheels, handstands, backbends, and walkovers. Gymnastics skills benefit from frequent practice. Even a quick few minutes of practice every day could make a huge difference versus once a week.


2

So the "shin" muscle everybody usually refers to is the anterior tibialis. Here are some stretches: http://walking.about.com/od/stretching/a/shinstretch.htm http://healthyliving.azcentral.com/stretch-anterior-tibialis-muscle-8489.html


2

Stretching doesn't build muscle. But it does have an important effect on your muscles that makes it useful both post workout and after any period of being still (sitting, sleeping, etc.). The muscle spindles are accustomed being at a "resting length". Say, if you sit in a chair for hours on end, your hamstrings become accustomed to being shortened. The ...


2

Focus on performing a dynamic warm up first. It is involves activating the working muscles and taking them through a full range of motion. Running with high knees, jumping jacks, mountain climbers, duck unders. These are a lot more effective than static stretching.


2

Warming up is performed before a performance or practice. Athletes, singers, actors and others warm up before stressing their muscles.A warm up generally consists of a gradual increase in intensity in physical activity.So WARM UP is ALWAYS DONE BEFORE WORK OUT. On the other hand Stretching is a form of physical exercise in which a specific muscle or tendon ...


2

It is not true. It is not necessary to stretch your arms after a run. Out of all the physical interventions we utilize today, stretching has the least amount of evidence behind it. This is secondary not only to our poor understanding of the mechanism through which a muscle may or may not be lengthened, but also our generally poor in vitro measurement ...


2

The machine you show is actually another type of elliptical trainer typically meant for light exercise or cardio work. I would suggest you look at performing some active stretching following a specific program for the hamstrings. For example, following a program designed for the target muscle. You may also want to search the ExRx site for stretches.


2

This exercise is commonly utilized in yoga practice. Your body alignment, breathing, and head movement are all important. Make sure to begin with your shoulders stacked directly above your wrists, and hips directly above knees (as shown in the images above). As you inhale, let your gaze trace up to the ceiling and backwards; your upper back should follow as ...


2

This happened to me when I started doing vigorous yoga again after an extended period of absence. My flexor muscles would cramp in simple things like child pose, but my base foot would always cramp during balance postures. It went away after a few weeks, in combination with the exercise and corrective measures. My primary training is as a massage therapist ...


2

You're describing two different types if stretching: ballistic, when you push with momentum, and static, when you push slower and hold the stretch steady for 30 seconds or more. Static is safer because you are much less likely to push too far when you know you're going to have to deal with the pain for the next 30 seconds or more. With ballistic, there is ...


2

Your back is probably hurting because you are immobilized in one position, something that a simple fidget can help. What actually happens is when muscle is immobilised in a shortened position (your hip flexors when you drive for example) for some time there is a loss of some muscle sarcomeres. GOOD NEWS is that this can be reversed once you are starting to ...


2

There is debate over how beneficial stretching actually is, but for these hard to stretch areas a foam roller (or similar tools for reaching smaller areas, such as the spikey balls) can be very useful for releasing tension short term, similar to a massage. They are pretty straight forward to use, but guides can be found online through a quick search. ...


2

Firstly, bad sitting will lead to bad posture, which will also be evidenced by a weak core. Secondly, no exercises will let you sit properly; all they can do is to strengthen your core and give you good reasons to sit properly. You have to make a conscious effort to sit properly. After practising it for a while, it might become second nature to you; ...


2

As far as I can tell, the word for the sound is Crepitus, although this not only describes "popping", but also "grating" and "crackling". While not necessarily pathological itself, many conditions actually do lead to that kind of sound. If it's especially the "popping" that interests you, the wiki on cracking joints seems to adress this. Different processes ...


2

Don't choose my answer. Wait for more knowledgeable people. I just want to give some suggestions. First, building muscle is very difficult. You shouldn't fear becoming bulky, it will not happen unless you do a very specific training and nutrition during a long time. Just exercise and forget about that fear (your muscles may become denser and harder in the ...


1

If you feel that your method works and is giving you the results you want, just keep doing it. It really doesn't matter what anybody thinks about it. If your ancle flexibility is stopping you from doing a proper squat then you should look into buying weightlifting shoes with an elevated heel. It will allow you to squat more upright without great ancle ...



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