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13

First off, ask your trainer how many athletes he or she has trained that have won national, regional, or international titles. Personally, my belief is that unless you have trained someone that's made the Olympic team (or around there), you should probably put your ego in check and emulate what the Olympic trainers are doing. Training isn't an art project ...


10

I know that it's not effective to train the same muscle group every day because the muscle needs time to recover. Indeed, the key parameter here is that training the muscle essentially involves damaging it (micro-tearing the muscle fibers) and then letting your body act as the repair man; this is a process that as you noted takes time. With streching ...


7

Harvard Medical School recommends stretching every day, and at least 2-3 times per week. As with all types of exercise, you need to engage in stretching regularly in order to reap lasting benefits. If you only stretch occasionally, the effects are shortlived. One study found that the greatest increase in hamstring length occurred right after the stretch ...


7

Here's something that might help a bit. From a 2009 study: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the long-term effects of two different stretching techniques on the range of motion (ROM) and on drop jump (DJ). DJ scores were assessed by means of a contact mat connected to a digital timer. ROM was measured by use of a goniometer. The ...


6

You're sore Wednesday because you squatted Monday. Soreness from lifting can easily last two or three days, and even get worse on later days. It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. Since waking up this morning, my lower back is very sore. It is as if I did a heavy workout. I don't understand why this happened. This wasn't as sore yesterday. ...


6

Flexibility is training just like any other training. There is no gene for flexibility. And, just like any other training, it will follow the same sort of timeline as any other exercise regimen. Nobody can tell you with any certainty how you will respond to stretching, unfortunately. If you want to increase your flexibility, you need to be working all the ...


5

Static stretching very slightly decreases the chance of injury at a strong detriment to strength. Its not necessarily wrong but if you want to lift heavy may be wrong for you. Cardio before lifting worries me though, as its likely that you will tire out many of your weakest muscles (much of your abdominals for example) before you even start lifting, causing ...


4

No static program will bring constant improvement. If you want to continue increasing flexibility over time, you need to do something like regularly attend a yoga class, where the exercises used progress over time and you're exposed to a wide variety of movements.


4

I'll preface this by saying this is purely my opinion based on many years of training and experience as a trainer. I, personally, would not perform “one more set with heavy weight stretching my pectorals as long as I can “ after 4 sets of regular flyes. Assuming hard work with heavy weights, your shoulders and pectoral muscles will be pretty exhausted. ...


4

Currently, there's no credible studies that show static stretching during exercise is helpful. In fact, as a result of some recent studies, the opposite seems to be true. That is, static stretching before and during a training session can have a negative effect. A study by the Journal of Strength and Conditioning, Chronic Effect of Static Stretching on ...


3

I haven't had problem with calf "heel" raises before, but I would take the writer's advice, calf raises are not my expertise. I do not know of whether pelvic tilts are safe or not, they didn't look extremely unsafe to me but it looked like it could possibly cause strain on certain areas(lower back, hip, etc.). Overall, instead of answering your third ...


3

As in my answer here, I'm a fan of Craig Ramsay's Anatomy of Stretching, which offers, along with a long list of stretches, both an hour-long comprehensive routine and a 15 minute "essentials" routine. Here is a low-res scan of the latter:


3

I could recommend some 'flows' like the 4 movement closed System from ido portal. https://youtu.be/D8QxbtcA5hU I like those kind of stretch and mobility drills highly effective and timesaving also are more fun then static stretching routines.


3

I danced for a long time and have a BA in it and was part of a modern dance company. I would look at really some general yoga stretching to begin with, this is something that we always did. A big key is to make sure you get the blood moving first to avoid injury. A simple way is to just make the class do jumping jacks, but that is boring. Since its ...


3

I have no strength or stretching exercises for this purpose, but I do see this: I have been spending one afternoon a week practicing cartwheels, handstands, backbends, and walkovers. Gymnastics skills benefit from frequent practice. Even a quick few minutes of practice every day could make a huge difference versus once a week.


2

On this site there should be every stretching exercise imaginable. Just do a couple each day, keep at it, be consistent and eventually It'll show: http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/finder/lookup/filter/exercisetype/id/3/exercisetype/stretching


2

Despite some answers naysaying stretching, it depends on what physicals activities you are going to do and -- what I read -- was consistency. The people who had fewest injuries were those who either regularly stretched before their workout -- OR -- regularly didn't stretch. Those that stretched inconsistently were the most like to achieve the "injured ...


2

Pain in the back of the knee (‘popliteal’ region) does have some common causes. The most common being a popliteal cyst caused by the buildup of synovial fluid in the knee that migrates to the back of the knee. The underlying cause is usually related to arthritis, or, acute cartilage injury to the knee. A popliteal cyst, also known as a Baker’s cyst, ...


2

I would like to supplement with the suggestion to implement SMR (Self-Myofascial Release) techniques to your flexibility (stretching) routine. SMR helps to release hypertonicity (tightness) in the connective tissues and muscles in the body (In Clark, In Sutton, In Lucett, & National Academy of Sports Medicine, 2015, p. 133). It helps to do SMR first ...


2

The reason is, that when you use a towel to pull your leg, two things happen at the same time: your hamstring is stretched, as you flex the hip and extend the knee but it is also contracting, as the pull of the towel has to be balanced by the same amount of push from your leg, that means both your calf and hamstring will have to work Stretching and ...


2

It's a little hard to tell, but since you have ruled out the scalene, trapezius and levator scapulae, my first suspects would be the sternocleidomastoid, or possibly (if it is towards the front of the neck), the platysmus muscle. This website, innerbody.com has a face muscle interface that is pretty nice, you can either hover over the muscle or the name, ...


1

It sounds like the pain in your hip is coming from your hip-flexors. This group is comprised of the: Illiopsoas; Sartorius; and Rectus Femorus. Their purpose is to: Flex your hip joint; Flex your trunk forward; Pull your thigh upward; and to help stabilize your lower body (at the pelvis). This picture doesn't do a great job of showing the weight ...


1

The position is pretty extensive on the knees. This video suggests to use a block under the hip not to damage the knees here where the practioner sits inbetween the heels (not on top of the heels). However, there are many different varieties to the position such as internal thights wide and sitting on heels here and sitting on heels with thighs side-by-side ...


1

Stretching chest for any long wont make it look better or bigger. Ppl do it bc how these exercices make'm feel after. I do stretchs for warm up. With elastics or low weight. 15-20sec. Little advice. If you keep doing your 15sec don't hold breath for that long. If you do it standing, stretch abs and keep'em contracted all along these 15 secs. Then you will ...


1

It sounds like you are doing everything that can be done to help your condition. The best I can do is to give you ideas for inspiration. 1) Get the right chair. Since you are sitting down all the time, there might be some special chairs that can help sit in a better position. 2) Change setting position every so often. Maybe once every 30 to 60 minutes 3) ...


1

I'll assume it's tendons, as I can't imagine that you're loading up your ligaments with a standard hamstring stretch, but I guess it's possible. Either way, there's a lot of connective tissue in there and no relevant muscle so the distinction between ligament and tendon might not be of much material relevance. The anterior knee pain you're experiencing is ...


1

It could be the inner and outer head of the gastrocnemius, but if you're doing the stretch where you lean forward into a stretched out leg, then that pain is perfectly normal. In my experience, it feels more like semimembranosus. But yeah, I experience the same thing, so I do another hamstring stretch, which doesn't require full extension of the leg. I ...


1

I hate to be the one who has to tell you this, but I have to agree with John P, at least to a degree. Football players have to be packed with a lot of muscles, which is easier attainable with weights. Some exercises that would enhance arm and hand strength probably include bicep curls, bench press, shoulder press, and dumbbell rows. I would honestly be more ...


1

The best way to learn is by doing. Of course, the risk with flips is that a) if you don't do them right, it's possible to severely injure yourself and b) doing them repeatedly is risky, because eventually, you will get tired and it makes the odds of doing the flip wrong more risky. You can reduce the incidence of the first case by practicing the flips in a ...


1

I found myself in a very similar situation as yours. I work 8 hours a day, commute an hour, and end up watch TV a couple hours a night (after cooking dinner). I consider myself in decent shape. My back was slightly sore, but I ignored it. It's getting slightly worse and I hear of much more serious (pain down leg) from other co-workers, so I decided to find ...



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