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7

I've seen you ask and answer questions, so I'm certain you have most of the theoretical answers you seek. Now, to make them realistic (aka broscience that's working for me). Don't eat when you are hungry. Eat when it's appropriate. Don't eat because you feel like it; eat because you don't want your body clinging to the fat you have. It's not just about ...


6

Your training really depends on your goals. There are several factors that program writers have to consider: Training effect: will this help you achieve goal X? In this case increase in muscle mass. Recovery: how quickly can someone train again if they do this routine once. Or what can they do while the body is recovering from some earlier work. As ...


5

Bent over rows are not bad for your back when you are used to handling the weight. However, when your bent over row (AKA Pendlay Row) is pretty close to your deadlift weight, as happens on SL5x5, then it's hard to balance it all out. For example, I'm an over 500 lbs deadlifter and can comfortably row 200 lbs for reps. Get too much over that and and I'm ...


5

Hopefully, I can help you sort through some of the information. I think you have every right to be skeptical of the claims on the Stronglifts site, Medhi does tend to overstate things and not dig deep at all. However, broscience is still useful when actual science doesn't have any information on the subject. The good news is that there is still some ...


5

Right now, today, I could back squat 100kg for five. But if I were starting a per-workout linear progression like StrongLifts, it would be a terrible idea to start with 100kg. Even 90kg would be ill-advised. I don't want to start lifting at my 5RM or even a high percentage of it. I want to leave some space as a buffer so that I can continue to add weight. ...


4

First, understand that stress in any form depresses your immune system. Lifting weights is a training stress, and in particular deadlifts can really push you over the edge. The goal is that when the stress is lifted and you recover you are at a stronger position. I have no idea what your current stats are with the squat, bench, deadlift, overhead press, ...


4

One of my other issues is my diet I believe. My TDEE is calculated to be 2439 calories/day, How do you know that? What source? which if you take off 20% makes it 1952. I eat below 1952 every day but don't see any weight loss and I think it's because my body is used to what I eat. I don't think it works that way. If you are not getting ...


4

That's a very overarching question, but I'll do my best to answer it: First off, the activity you do does not matter that much if your goal is to lose fat weight. Although it does matter if you want to keep lean body mass (i.e. muscle weight), so let's dive a bit deeper into this. Basically, every diet is calories in vs. calories out. If you use up more ...


4

My advice will be a bit different, but there's some preliminary things to understand first: Determine the nature of your soreness first: Back pump (where there is an uncomfortable tightness in the lower back) is normal and nothing to be concerned about. Sharp pain, or even a dull pain that is different from general tightness is a symptom of bad form which ...


3

Lower back pain is commonly caused by improper form. Squats, DL's, and rows will do this to you if you allow your lumbar to go into flexion during any parts of the lifts. Film yourself when squatting, deadlifting, etc, and see if you are maintaining extension or going into flexion. My experience is this is why low back pain persists. Also, word to the ...


3

The thing that concerns me is this: Here is my problem. 2 weeks ago I got squeezed by the 142.5kg (314lbs) barbell while doing squats. Nothing really bad happened because I have squat rack, but I felt a little needle pinch in my left upper belly (just under my ribs). I have a mental picture of your upper body folding forward creating an impingement. ...


2

I started 5x5 in May 2014, and the workouts have lengthened to 1.5--2 hours depending on which workout I'm on (shorter for Deadlift day). For reference, my current lifts: Squat: 240 Bench: 160 OH Press: 95 Deadlift: 285 I switched to 3x5 on squats on 10/1. I will be 62 in December. I've deloaded three times on squats, 4 times on OH press, but not on ...


2

The StrongLifts report, page 48, says the 5x5-to-3x5 switch often occurs around a squat of 200 pounds: My own analysis of hundreds of training logs and surveys of StrongLifts Members shows that most guys usually need to switch from 5x5 to 3x5 once they hit the 200lbs mark on the Squat. Now before you fix on this number – many StrongLifts Members got way ...


2

It depends on what you're going for, really. You can't just alter your workout and expect the exact same results. With that said, you can of course keep the overall volume by dropping weight and adding reps. But due to the change in rep-range you would be focussing not on maximum strength anymore, but on hypertrophy (8-12 reps) or endurance (12-25 reps). ...


2

Step 1: consult a doctor to determine: If it's really hemorrhoids The severity if it is And the protocol to remedy it. If the hemorrhoid was caused by lifting, then know it won't get any better if you continue lifting the way you do. You can work through minor hemorrhoids, but refine your technique. Step 2: fix your form You'll find that you need to ...


2

You aren't telling us about your diet or sleep schedule. Both these factors are important when considering illness. [This part should be a comment, but I can't comment yet] Answer: If it is directly related to going to the gym you might want to make sure you are washing your hands thoroughly after a gym session. The gym is a great place for germs to spread. ...


2

The Rippetoe video is fairly comprehensive, and I use it as the basis of my setup. The bar should feel almost like it's locked into your back when you find the spot. When you squeeze the shoulders together and get the bar in the right spot, there's sort of a groove that forms (or will form after some delt development). I take my grip, squeeze my shoulders ...


2

IMO, a belt shouldn't be necessary until you get to a weight about 2 times your bodyweight, if even then. Fix your form, don't try to patch the problem with a belt. If your back is hurting, you're probably leaning forward and rounding your back to compensate for tight hip flexors or limited ankle dorsiflexion. Video or have someone else video you while you ...


2

First off, and most importantly - A belt should not be a fix for bad form! That said, a sore back is common when deadlifting. You should get a professional - a real professional - not your local gym-head or 5 $ a hour trainer to coach you. Good form is crucial, especially on heavy exercises. The money you invest in learning the basics will come back ...


2

It's a little hard to write this out, but when benching "power lifter style", I usually approach like this: Try to drive your shoulder blades into the bench. You want lots of positive and balanced contact between your upper back and the pad. You will be on the toes / balls of your feet, which helps to arch your back. Your feet will be nearly under your ...


1

This schedule looks pretty good! On the SL site he discusses how to break up rest when adding in intense cardio here. Assuming your core days are not too much, everything looks in order, though I'm a little curious about what that work consists of. Your core strength will be tremendously increased if you follow the SL plan with correct form. Just don't wear ...


1

pass, Since your goal is to develop functional strength, StrongLifts is a great program for that. To get the best of StrongLifts, it's recommended to perform them 3 times a week. One of the reasons is because since you're starting with a low weight (empty bar), it would take a longer time for you to start lifting heavy weights. Since core days are recovery ...


1

I don't think a high or low bar squat should necessarily cause knee pain: both are okay when performed correctly. As such, I wouldn't look at that as the cause of your issue. The low bar squat is "better" because you can push more weight. There are a lot of competitive level crossfitters that never low bar squat: their knees are fine. Regardless of all of ...


1

1) Some people (especially women) seem to have much more pronounced arches even when trying to be neutral. Bret Contreras has linked that a bit to more of an illusion resulting from differences in body composition (larger hips, larger butts, usually less back muscle tissue). But it's pretty common to see these crazy arched backs. Try standing up "straight" ...


1

Judging by your height and weight, you seem like you require a more beginners approach to weight lifting and power lifting is not recommended. Since you dont have a solid base, it will be very tough for you to mantain a proper form. I recommend you to start using machines for all the mentioned exercises, the machines prevent unwanted injuries and also ...


1

The routine you posted, as well as the one in the link you provided in the comments, take some ideas of High Intensity Training (HIT) to make single sets work. The general idea behind HIT is going as hard as you can, often using intensity techniques. Once the set is done, you gave it your all and there's nothing more to do, so you move on to the next ...


1

Hi Iain, Do you take multi-vitamins? If not, you need to add multi-vitamins to your daily intake. Vitamin C is especially needed for immune system boost. Since you've already sought medical help and nothing obvious could be found, I would start with taking the multi-vitamins. Our bodies can't produce all the nutrients it needs; that's why ...


1

If your depth is fine and the knee cave is moderate then don't worry about it. Maybe stay for a few extra sessions at this weight so you feel more comfortable with it. But a little knee cave isn't too much to worry about if everything else is copacetic. If you deload then ten or twenty pounds and working back up is fine.


1

I do not think you should drop the weights down and “focusing on really opening my hips up.” As long as you are not bowing the knees in to much I believe that this is somewhat of a natural progression once someone move beyond being a novice and really has to grind and work for every pound. Bowing the knees in slightly help you get out of the hole (the ...


1

I found it helpful to drop the weight and focus on good form and after a short while you can try to put on more weight. Some ligaments and muscles just need more time to adapt. An assistance exercise can not work the weak link the way your main exercise would and if you already can do this exercise in good form with less weight I see no reason why to train ...



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