Hot answers tagged

10

After reading your comments to John P's quite accurate answer, I think the question you're really asking is "why are deadlifts so much more taxing than squats" (maybe rename the title if I'm accurate on that). If that's the case, I'd offer these up: Deadlifts put much more load on your thoracic spine, arms, shoulders, rhomboids, and hands. You can see ...


7

Squat - 110 lbs BP - 75 lbs Row - 80 lbs OHP - 55 lbs DL - 165 lbs As you can see the barbell row and the OHP are lagging behind. Your row is stronger than your bench press which is actually really good, I think your numbers look terrific to be honest. Just keep on the program. The overhead press is probably one of the toughest lifts out there. ...


7

If physique is your primary goal, then your changes are not bad. However, it does require some adjustments to how you approach progression. First and foremost, volume is the #1 determiner of how much muscle you put on (citation). There are a wide variety of ways to increase volume. One strategy is to maintain the same weight while you increase volume: ...


6

You're sore Wednesday because you squatted Monday. Soreness from lifting can easily last two or three days, and even get worse on later days. It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. Since waking up this morning, my lower back is very sore. It is as if I did a heavy workout. I don't understand why this happened. This wasn't as sore yesterday. ...


6

"almost a month ago" - Almost? ALMOST A MONTH?! I'm going to be harshly honest here; come back in a year, and give me the new numbers. If you can't stick with the program for at least a year, this just isn't for you. In terms of health and fitness, nothing of value happens in a month. If it did, there'd be no fat people, and everyone would have rippling ...


6

The bottom line is you want your shoulder in a neutral position. That doesn't necessarily mean full scapular retraction, but it's a cue that helps a lot of people. Considering your level of experience, and the fact you came off of injury I would advise you to use that scapular retraction, but only to the point where your shoulder is in a neutral position. ...


5

5×5 stands for five sets of five reps. These are the sets and reps you do on every exercise except Deadlifts. Deadlift is only one set of five reps (1×5) because doing more would beat you up. Plus, Squatting three times a week will get you stronger at Deadlifts since it works similar muscles. Read more: http://stronglifts.com/5x5/ From the page ...


5

Is my 5x8 adaptation a good or bad idea? I don't think it is a good idea. The 5x5 format is for a purpose, to do heavy lifts for many sets, to add strength. Increasing reps per set will lead to more work yes, but you will lift less on the next sets, leading to a more endurance focused workout. What difference will 5x8 have on my ...


4

There's the answer in the general case, and there's the answer for this case. First this case, then the general. You Are Fucking Around Starting Strength, but with carrying exercises...StrongLifts, but with Olympic work...no, wait, pull-ups...then planks and front squats...plus overhead squats...and now round-backed deadlifts? I don't say this to be mean, ...


4

Deadlift properly It's almost impossible to remotely determine what the trouble is, but: during deadlift, while pulling, my upper back is rounding but once I reach the top most position, everything is locked and I attain perfect 'chest up' That's not good. For a strong back, you want a perfect, tense, straight, shoulderblades-retracted position for ...


3

5x8 changes the program drastically. It will be harder to add weight regularly, and the stimulus will tend more towards endurance and hypertrophy than strength. I'm not sure that's a good idea but you're free to see how it goes. I would say that you're dramatically changing the character of the program by doing that while also adding so many assistance ...


3

If you're overhead pressing as much as you're deadlifting, either something is wrong (like a deadlift-preventing injury) or you're not challenging your deadlift. The way humans are built make them able to lift more--a lot more--with some lifts than with others. So yes, the ratios between different lifts matters in StrongLifts. If you look around, you can ...


3

A 1200 pound deadlift would be a world record in any category (raw/equipped etc), so yeah he's lying. There doesn't seem to be a world record in standing military press, but the highest numbers I'm finding is around 500 pounds.


3

It seems that you either started too low on StrongLifts, or you are indeed a beginner based on continuing to make progress on the program. You'll only benefit from exhausting your beginner gains in a linear based program like this. You'll be able to go back much stronger for your Olympic lifts. In the meantime, to avoid losing technical proficiency, I'd ...


3

I really disagree with knocks against strength programs that they don't do anything for size. You simply cannot overhead press your bodyweight, or squat twice your bodyweight, without being big and powerful. I've never done a curl in over a decade and my arms are bigger than 90% of the people in a gym (which isn't saying much, to be honest). Because ...


3

How have you done the chin-ups? Take care that you keep tension all the way during the repetition especially at the bottom of the exercise. Also if you go to wide you can injure your rotator cuff. Here is some good advice on chin/pull-ups: http://jasonferruggia.com/the-shocking-truth-about-chin-ups/ it simply says that the best way to do those exercises ...


2

If doing a program similar to StrongLifts is important to you, consider buying the Starting Strength book and following its program. It is similar to StrongLifts, but more detailed and includes the power clean. Also consider following an Olympic-lifting-specific program, like something from Catalyst Athletics (see other resources from them) or the Glenn ...


2

Train hard, and recover harder. This is a very complete schedule, but I would warn you to be careful of the other part of the equation that is recovery. Your body is a machine that is tuned to respond to external stress (dieting, strength training, aerobic training are all stressors) and that stress needs to be increased slowly so as to not cause yourself to ...


2

Squat: It seems like the weight is really light for you, you're bouncing around pretty fast. Your depth is great. Read up on butt wink, because you've definitely got that going on. I can see your toes dancing around a bit which is great because it means you're driving through your heels. Bench: As Dave said, you're really light on that lift. I think a ...


2

These all look fairly correct. Minor Corrections Squat: Mostly fine. Stay tight. Keep your chest up. Barbell row: Mostly fine. Bench: can't really tell, mostly fine. Overhead press: mostly fine, can't really tell. Deadlift: Mostly fine. I'd focus a bit more on setting your lower back position before each rep. Also, there is no reason for you to alternate ...


2

Use some calculator to calculate your macros, a simple one like this There are three major macronutrients, or macros for short : Protein, Carbohydrates and fats. Using the macro calculator you can calculate how much of each do you need daily. Fill those needs, and you will lose weight, if that is what you want. Use a site like myfitnesspal to track your ...


2

A regular training program will eventually encounter head colds, bad sleep, and other curve balls of life. Do your warmups and make sure you have the mental wherewithal to handle your coordination and strength. Worst case scenario, get in there and do ~75% of your weight or something of the sort. Unless you have a real injury I'd just throttle back the ...


2

Don't. The issue is not "weak abs" but that you haven't been properly engaging your abs during squats. Heavy squats, unlike light squats, require a locked trunk, which requires abdominal engagement. This doesn't mean you need to do ab-specific work. It means you need to set up your squats correctly. Additional ab work can be OK, or it can distract. I ...


2

I think that without seeing your posture and movement, it really is difficult to say what the issue could be, but incorporating Overhead-Squats (even Front Squats) are forcing you to keep the upper back tense all the time and breast up, and with focusing on Barbell Rows you can strengthening your (potential) weak areas. I would start the Overhead-Squat ...


1

I'm going to differ from Dave's answer and throw out some ab exercises, because I feel that done right they'll accomplish two things: Your abs will get stronger, which is important but not so much as the next item. You're gaining motor unit recruitment, and learning specifically how to engage them. A good example of this for me (and others I've seen) is ...


1

You are putting yourself at a higher risk. There's always the chance for injury to happen whether you slept for 12 hours or none. What most likely will happen is that you'll feel tired sooner and won't be able to lift as much as you usually do.


1

You can, and you may, there's not much need to start that low unless you are new to that particular lift, just start at a weight which you will achieve in the fourth week. Which means, if you are currently lifting 225, you should start from 160-165 (5 pound increase each workout), that'll be more than enough.


1

Will it harm my body proportions to lift 36kg on EVERY exercise in Stronglifts, or must they absolutely have a difference in ratio? I don't think it will harm your body at all, especially since the other answer seems to be "stop exercising so often". Dave Liepmann's answer is correct in that ratios matter because they mimic the strength of the human ...


1

Make sure to eat enough, you're very light for that height, thin people often have a hard time eating enough to add weight, but when they do, they tend to add lean mass and strength.


1

As long as your form is good, then you are more unlikely to injure yourself. For rows, some 'body English' is fine to help drive progressions, especially since it is not a competitive movement, so being strict with momentum isn't inherently necessary. If doing Pendlay rows (as advocated by Mehdi), you can have a bit of thoracic extension to aid with ...



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