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7

I've seen you ask and answer questions, so I'm certain you have most of the theoretical answers you seek. Now, to make them realistic (aka broscience that's working for me). Don't eat when you are hungry. Eat when it's appropriate. Don't eat because you feel like it; eat because you don't want your body clinging to the fat you have. It's not just about ...


6

Presuppositions The presuppositions in this question are mistaken. A) It is possible to gain muscle and lose fat at the same time if the conditions are right. B) It's not true that one should not change one's training program while cutting--one should still do some heavy lifting, but the program should change. The point of heavy lifting during a cut is to ...


6

Your training really depends on your goals. There are several factors that program writers have to consider: Training effect: will this help you achieve goal X? In this case increase in muscle mass. Recovery: how quickly can someone train again if they do this routine once. Or what can they do while the body is recovering from some earlier work. As ...


5

Right now, today, I could back squat 100kg for five. But if I were starting a per-workout linear progression like StrongLifts, it would be a terrible idea to start with 100kg. Even 90kg would be ill-advised. I don't want to start lifting at my 5RM or even a high percentage of it. I want to leave some space as a buffer so that I can continue to add weight. ...


5

Hopefully, I can help you sort through some of the information. I think you have every right to be skeptical of the claims on the Stronglifts site, Medhi does tend to overstate things and not dig deep at all. However, broscience is still useful when actual science doesn't have any information on the subject. The good news is that there is still some ...


4

That's a very overarching question, but I'll do my best to answer it: First off, the activity you do does not matter that much if your goal is to lose fat weight. Although it does matter if you want to keep lean body mass (i.e. muscle weight), so let's dive a bit deeper into this. Basically, every diet is calories in vs. calories out. If you use up more ...


4

One of my other issues is my diet I believe. My TDEE is calculated to be 2439 calories/day, How do you know that? What source? which if you take off 20% makes it 1952. I eat below 1952 every day but don't see any weight loss and I think it's because my body is used to what I eat. I don't think it works that way. If you are not getting ...


4

First a couple of points to consider: 6-8 weeks is not long enough to lose all of your strength It is long enough to lose a little of your strength You will be sore the first week back doing Stronglifts. The answer will essentially be the same as the question you pointed to, it's just a matter of degree. Nothing is more demoralizing than trying to work ...


4

Pain during a lift is indication of injury. We can't diagnose what that injury is, but you need at minimum a rest week, a 20% deload, and mandatory form checks before allowing yourself to progress to heavier weights.


4

Stronglifts 5x5 is best suited for healthy people who can at least handle an empty bar. You are starting from an unhealthy point, so it's probably not the best option for you. The bottom line is that you want to start with something you can do properly without joint pain. Your muscles may get sore and that's OK, but you don't want sharp pain after ...


4

Octagonal plates interfere with proper strength training Octagonal plates have no reason to exist, and are actively counterproductive to working out properly. Octagonal or otherwise non-round plates make many fundamental barbell exercises from the floor--including cleans, snatches, and most importantly deadlifts--awkward. Upon putting plates down, the bar ...


4

First, understand that stress in any form depresses your immune system. Lifting weights is a training stress, and in particular deadlifts can really push you over the edge. The goal is that when the stress is lifted and you recover you are at a stronger position. I have no idea what your current stats are with the squat, bench, deadlift, overhead press, ...


3

You were lifting for "about" 12 weeks and now you are taking a 6-or-more week break. That's a lot of time off compared to the amount of time lifting. It's almost as if you're doing the program for the first time. You should deload by 25 to 75 percent, then restart the program just as you were. Assuming that you followed the program exactly and had no ...


3

Lower back pain is commonly caused by improper form. Squats, DL's, and rows will do this to you if you allow your lumbar to go into flexion during any parts of the lifts. Film yourself when squatting, deadlifting, etc, and see if you are maintaining extension or going into flexion. My experience is this is why low back pain persists. Also, word to the ...


2

While I cannot compete with the wisdom and experience of Berin, I want to add my point of view on StrongLift 5x5 and similar programs. I am in rehab for having pushed too hard and injured my shoulders. This has given me the opportunity to a lot of personal research. I know now what I am going to do when my rehab is over, and it has little to do with ...


2

It's important to realize that rowing is primarily a leg exercise, it's like a horizonntle power clean, arms and back just carry through the power generated by the legs. Given the high volume of squats in the 5x5 program, intense rowing is likely to wear out your legs, but light rowing is probably ok if it is absolutely needed. This is from the standpoint ...


2

It's easy to make the argument that a plate has only one requirement: to weigh a certain amount. However, round plates enable a range of exercises that are impractical with any weight that has straight edges. Any floor exercise: i.e. rows, deadlifts, cleans Any exercise that requires rolling: i.e. barbell ab rollouts The difference is significant enough ...


2

Personally I would do the rehab exercises exactly as prescribed, perhaps after warming up and before the StrongLifts workout on days when I have that scheduled. I'd then do StrongLifts as prescribed for the lower body, but reduce the upper-body progressions to add weight every two weeks instead of every workout. Therefore my barbell row, bench press, and ...


2

Since you are still in the midst of rehab, and the other stuff will help you get stronger, I'd recommend starting with 3x5 instead of 5x5. The whole reason Stronglifts has 5x5 at the beginning is really for more practice. The problem is that it's more practice while you are still zeroing in on how your body performs the lift. My recommendations are: ...


2

Doing something like StrongLifts 5x5, Starting Strength, or Madcow on a calorie deficit is like running into a headwind. It will be harder to make good progress with the weights. Essentially, you will run out of energy before you feel like you are really challenging your strength. There's nothing magical about any of the programs I listed, but the lot of ...


2

The thing that concerns me is this: Here is my problem. 2 weeks ago I got squeezed by the 142.5kg (314lbs) barbell while doing squats. Nothing really bad happened because I have squat rack, but I felt a little needle pinch in my left upper belly (just under my ribs). I have a mental picture of your upper body folding forward creating an impingement. ...


2

The StrongLifts report, page 48, says the 5x5-to-3x5 switch often occurs around a squat of 200 pounds: My own analysis of hundreds of training logs and surveys of StrongLifts Members shows that most guys usually need to switch from 5x5 to 3x5 once they hit the 200lbs mark on the Squat. Now before you fix on this number – many StrongLifts Members got way ...


2

It depends on what you're going for, really. You can't just alter your workout and expect the exact same results. With that said, you can of course keep the overall volume by dropping weight and adding reps. But due to the change in rep-range you would be focussing not on maximum strength anymore, but on hypertrophy (8-12 reps) or endurance (12-25 reps). ...


2

Step 1: consult a doctor to determine: If it's really hemorrhoids The severity if it is And the protocol to remedy it. If the hemorrhoid was caused by lifting, then know it won't get any better if you continue lifting the way you do. You can work through minor hemorrhoids, but refine your technique. Step 2: fix your form You'll find that you need to ...


2

You aren't telling us about your diet or sleep schedule. Both these factors are important when considering illness. [This part should be a comment, but I can't comment yet] Answer: If it is directly related to going to the gym you might want to make sure you are washing your hands thoroughly after a gym session. The gym is a great place for germs to spread. ...


1

If your depth is fine and the knee cave is moderate then don't worry about it. Maybe stay for a few extra sessions at this weight so you feel more comfortable with it. But a little knee cave isn't too much to worry about if everything else is copacetic. If you deload then ten or twenty pounds and working back up is fine.


1

I do not think you should drop the weights down and “focusing on really opening my hips up.” As long as you are not bowing the knees in to much I believe that this is somewhat of a natural progression once someone move beyond being a novice and really has to grind and work for every pound. Bowing the knees in slightly help you get out of the hole (the ...


1

I found it helpful to drop the weight and focus on good form and after a short while you can try to put on more weight. Some ligaments and muscles just need more time to adapt. An assistance exercise can not work the weak link the way your main exercise would and if you already can do this exercise in good form with less weight I see no reason why to train ...


1

Anaroebic training does have a positive effect on VO2, or oxygen consumption. The body adapts in this way for a few reasons. Firstly, intravascular pressure increases during heavy lifts, like when performing squats. Because you have to hold your breath (pretty much) and engage your core, your cardiovascular system responds by increasing blood pressure and ...


1

In my opinion the best core exercise is a prone bridge. You can also do side bridges for more emphasis on the obliques.



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