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Of the two strokes you say you know, breaststroke is very difficult to learn to swim fast, and certainly hard to use as a cardiovascular exercise for any significantly long time. Assuming (by the fact that you only know half the strokes) that you are not a competitive swimmer, freestyle is best for you. To add to [Ivo Flipse]'s1 answer: in addition to ...


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To clarify some of the points made by others: Yes, you do breathe out through nose and mouth simultaneously to exhale most effectively. If you haven't finished exhaling, your inhale will be too late and your stroke will suffer. Alternating sides, taking an odd number of strokes between breaths, is good for balancing your stroke. If you breathe to one side ...


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It depends on your body and acclimation. I had a friend who was an excellent swimmer who died after being stranded in Lake Michigan when it was 45F. I was at a 1 and 2 mile race once where the water temperature was 68F, and it was early season so people had only acclimated with warm pool swimming. Out of 500 or so people, 3 women without wetsuits became ...


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Do whichever one that fits your schedule. Note that if you choose to do the swimming in the morning and working out in the evening, then your nutrition needs to be looked at a bit more carefully. For example, if in the morning, after you finish your swimming workout, and you don't eat an adequate amount of carbs and protein in order to replenish your ...


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As an American Red Cross Lifeguard Instructor I can say with absolute certainty that for the 300 yard swim it does not matter how much of it is front crawl or how much of it is breaststroke, but you can only swim those two strokes and can only switch strokes at a wall (not in the middle of a the pool). Also it is likely that your instructor will have you do ...


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Since freestyle and backstroke makes you rotate about the spine, and breaststroke hyperflexes the spine to the back, you're left with butterfly. And since that is not practical for plain exercising you're seemingly out of options. But depending on the nature and position of your disc problems, you might be able to find a way to strengthen the muscles around ...


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Adding to the other answers: No, there are no particular disadvantages to getting your nose full of water. Pools are generally rather clean, and lakes and oceans are too, at least where you are likely to swim. And if you are feet down head up, your nostrils are down, making it hard for the water to enter if you close your epiglottis. That said, you should ...



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