Hot answers tagged

23

Although swimming alone in the middle of Lake Michigan sounds wonderful and has its benefits to you, swimming alone has life altering/ending risks. The chances may be minimal that something dangerous could happen, but see my story below for an example that bad things can happen. If something did happen you don't seem to have left yourself any communication ...


11

I've done a lot of offshore sailing and sometimes you'll get totally becalmed. Hot muggy conditions and the water is so flat you can literally shave in the reflection. It's hard not to jump in with conditions like that. Soap up, jump in, swim around the boat a few times, etc. A very famous and accomplished sailor named Bernard Moitessier would (solo) have ...


9

Swimming is good for people of any size. Your weight loss/gain will be determined by your diet. If you don't want to lose any more weight, eat more! Short answer: Keep swimming! It's a great way to build muscle and endurance. EDIT: I want to elaborate a bit. I usually try to spend the same amount of time writing an answer, as the asker spends writing the ...


8

Growing up surfing, I'd get water in my nose constantly. When stuffed up I'd splash some up in there and snot rocket all the junk out. Even a "saline nasal spray" is just a fancy way of blowing salt water into your nose. If there's a problem I'd venture to guess it has more to do with whatever badness is in the water (chemicals, pathogens, etc). You can ...


6

It is difficult to say without seeing your swim stroke, but I suspect that when you are breathing, you are over rotating, with your head pulled back rather than being in a neutral position. That would allow water to enter in your nose. When swimming freestyle, you don't really move your head much. The top of the head should be in the water, which will ...


6

It depends what you mean by okay. If you mean "is it safe?" then the answer is simple: No, it is not safe. If you get into trouble you stand a high risk of death. No-one will be able to rescue you. But for the broader question of whether that means it's not okay, we can't answer that. It's up to you to assess the danger by assessing the chances of an ...


6

The switch from the pool to the lake/ocean can be challenging. Google on "overcome fear of open water swimming" or "panic attack triathlete water" and you will find that you are not alone. There are two aspects of your question: Overcoming fear in general when training/doing sports and Specifics with swimming. Overcoming fear in general when training ...


5

As it stands, you may be fit enough, but you are not trained enough, unless you plan on walking pretty much the entire run portion of the event. Most marathon plans (Which is a distance shorter than the 30 miles) will have you running 50-70 miles a week, with quite a few runs in the 10-15 mile range. However, I think the biggest limiter right now is your ...


5

If you are young and you have no past injuries to your knee ligaments, I suggest you don't give up running but rather focus on a better running technique, lowering your mileage for some time, changing your program or even trying different shoes instead. Medical doctors who aren't specially devoted to sport medicine are usually prone to sending you to swim at ...


4

Simply practising a swim style again and again does not necessarily makes you swim better. Moreover, you might be reinforcing the bad aspects in your technique. What you need to include in your workouts is swimming drills. They are special modified exercises aiming to make you focus on one single aspect of the technique at a time. Here is a random example ...


3

Having crossed the Pacific Ocean on our own boat, we thought a lot about questions such as this. In general I would not be concerned about swimming mid-lake, as the danger does not seem materially greater than the boat sinking mid-lake with you aboard, a risk you seem willing to accept. Obviously significant swell or wind which could blow the boat away from ...


2

Proper hydration is key to preventing cramps. If you have ruled hydration out as a cause, try rolling the arches of your feet on a lacrosse ball (you can get them cheap at the sporting goods store in sets of 3 or ask to get some old ones from a club team). Stand on one leg then step the arch of the other leg onto the lacrosse ball. Apply as much pressure ...


2

You have a timing issue. From the way you are describing it, you are waiting until your arm is fully extended before you are turning your head to breathe, which will cause your arm to drop. This is because the water is slowing your forward momentum, and it's hard to keep your arm up as your body sinks. You (most likely, it's very hard to diagnose swimming ...


2

Swimming is generally considered a "safe" exercise, because it is low impact, so less wear and tear on the body. It is also a full body sport, which makes it better than other low impact alternatives such as cycling, where you don't get much upper body workout. However, as have been pointed out in comments, you can still sustain injury if you swim with poor ...


2

Would like to add the "glide" phase is the most misunderstood portion for the stroke. No matter what type of swimming learning / teaching you follow there should be a constant movement on the front end of the stroke. What appears to be gliding is simply a swimmer that has gotten very good at full extension with a seamless transition to a catch and then ...


2

Your specific question is: are there any disadvantages to letting water enter the nose? Aside from any annoyance or discomfort, the disadvantages are a potential for infection and possible swallowing irritants. Any time recreational water enters your body, there is a risk of infection. Other swimmers may be contaminating the pool (e.g., swimming ...


2

I am water skier and bare footer. When you are coming up especially on a bare foot back up trick you may get water up your nose. It does irritate some people and they just use water proof bandage tape to tape the nostrils shut. I learned it from Mike Seipel - a former bare world barefoot champion.


2

Unfortunately, the tests that you refer to at Top End are probably going to be your best bet at determining a VO2max for swimming. There are some testing setups where you are in an endless pool or flume, and wearing the expiration mask, but those are very specialized. If you want a water based test, the polo ones are the only ones I'm aware of. However, ...


2

If we're talking about delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), there is little that attenuates the discomfort. I don't think there's any evidence to suggest swimming in particular helps, but anything that increases blood flow to the area will lessen, to a degree, the pain. Light exercise (of all stripes, so long as you're exercising the affect muscles) ...


2

A true beginner swimmer is someone that isn't comfortable in the water, hasn't learned to float or tread water. Generally beginner classes teach comfort in the water, elementary backstroke, breaststroke and the front crawl. If you can tread water and swim 1 length, you aren't really considered a beginner. Intermediate swimmers kind of run the gamut. At the ...


2

There is progress to be had both by continuing to swim using tired muscles, and switching styles to train other muscles. Using the same muscles, even when they're tired, means those muscles are going to get even stronger than if you stopped. But giving them a bit of a rest, and going back is even better, because you can usually go for longer. So my advice ...


1

I workout every day (three day split so the same body part is only hit on the fourth day) and play soccer twice a week (no leg day on soccer day obviously). Different muscles are used so there is no impact and no limitation. Same for you, do what you enjoy the most and often! :)


1

The biking in that triathlon seems to be really short compared to the running and the swimming. But running that distance require stepping a the distance gradually. So I would recommend that you try to step up the running distance slowly and see how it feels, that is probably one of the best ways to see if you are fit also. The other legs doesn't sound that ...


1

Why not tie a rope or something to the boat and yourself? So if anything happens to the boat you'll still be connected.


1

Is it safe? It's somewhat less safe than swimming alone in a backyard pool without a life jacket. It's all about your own personal assumption of risk. You are an experienced swimmer and (presumably) experienced boater. You are swimming with a life jacket on. You have taken steps to minimize what factors you can. There are myriad things that could go wrong, ...


1

I cannot comment as I don't have enough reputation just yet. I agree with the person above. And yes of course it is great to mix it up ! I would recommend looking up swim sets on the internet for beginners. You are Belgian so jut type something like "session 4 nages d├ębutant" and you'll find plenty of cool sessions. Once more advanced, look up the masters ...


1

Every swimming stroke can do each of these things, and focus on different muscle groups. My suggestion, just swim laps! If you swam a lot as a kid, just pick it back up. Start with some of the easier strokes like breast stroke until you see some aerobic improvement. If you feel comfortable with that and are getting bored. Move to the backstroke and ...


1

I'm a sprint freestyler, but I do know exercises for fly. Upper chest exercises like incline bench are great for overall strength in your stroke. Lat pull downs and wide grip pull ups increase power through the pull. Squats can make your kick more powerful. Fly mainly uses chest, shoulders, lats, glutes, hamstrings, and quads. more reps with less weight will ...


1

I use a mechanical hand held tally that i leave at the edge of the pool and i click each time I'm at that end, so that counts the number of laps. the tally costs around 15 dollars. I've slightly modified it by removing the plastic cover that goes over the numbers so that i may clearly read the numbers. since it's mechanical it's not affected by the water ...


1

Are you doing the swims all straight with no break? If you are looking to improve your overall speed (while also maintaining better technique), consider breaking up your swim. 1000m --> 10x100 w. :10 sec rest at each wall That little bit of a breather at the wall will do wonders in terms of helping you reset and refocus on the next rep and maintain that ...



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