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Without actually seeing your stroke, I am going to make the guess that it is related to breathing. Breastroke, it is easy to do a slow stroke (and a 40 minute mile qualifies) and breathe in and out regularly while your face is above the water. In freestyle, the tendency for people that are not competitive swimmers is to hold their breath while their face ...


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Good idea to take a few lessons, mainly to get confidence in the water so as not to fear training alone. Once you have control in the water you might experiment with these tweaks that made my strokes better later in life in favor of basic swim class instruction. These techniques would hamper speed for competitive swimming, but are excellent for training. ...


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It depends on your body and acclimation. I had a friend who was an excellent swimmer who died after being stranded in Lake Michigan when it was 45F. I was at a 1 and 2 mile race once where the water temperature was 68F, and it was early season so people had only acclimated with warm pool swimming. Out of 500 or so people, 3 women without wetsuits became ...


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To clarify some of the points made by others: Yes, you do breathe out through nose and mouth simultaneously to exhale most effectively. If you haven't finished exhaling, your inhale will be too late and your stroke will suffer. Alternating sides, taking an odd number of strokes between breaths, is good for balancing your stroke. If you breathe to one side ...


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Since freestyle and backstroke makes you rotate about the spine, and breaststroke hyperflexes the spine to the back, you're left with butterfly. And since that is not practical for plain exercising you're seemingly out of options. But depending on the nature and position of your disc problems, you might be able to find a way to strengthen the muscles around ...


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It'd be interesting to know how well your learning turned out. As an answer to the original question, first of all, it is actually a good idea to augment a once-a-week swim class with practicing on your own (or with a friend from class). Your instructor would probably agree. As for equipment, you should be able to borrow the most common equipment at the ...


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The answer depends so much on where you are. Winter by the Mediterranean, southeastern US or Southern California or the like is no worries. Winter in the English Channel or in Seattle would be troublesome. Open water swimming where I live is not pleasant in winter. Swimming in a dry suit defeats the purpose, so I assume we are talking wetsuit swimming. And ...


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Yes. Since the workout names five types of drills right after saying 5x50, I'd interpret that as one 50 of each. The interpretation of the second set is also right, especially if you take time to use equipment in the pull and kick. But you could of course divide that 400 as four 100s, eight 50s or even sixteen 25s. If your coach is not on deck, you decide, I'...


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Since you describe yourself as a sprinter in another question I'd like to add explosive exercises like Olympic lifts and box jumps to the advice you already received. I would also recommend a short swimming session after a hard gym session, if your gym is at the pool. It feels so much better afterwards, I promise.


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Since you say 500 and you're European, I assume the race is open water? That assumption is strengthened by that it is the first leg of a team triathlon. In that case, I'd say you worry for no reason at all. Without the turns you get in the pool, your mindset will be so different anyway, there's no way you'll sprint hard enough to not finish well. On the ...


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Swimming 1000m straight is nuts. Even seasoned swimmers like myself only do that when we have to – that is in preparation for a race that is that long. ;) Here is an easier way to keep track of how far you've swum, and one that will give you better training than just doing it straight: 2x50 back + 100 free 4x50 back + 200 free 6x50 back + 300 free 8x50 ...


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If you are serious, do contact your local swim club to join their masters (adult swimming) group where you'll learn all the strokes and how to design a proper swimming workout. It is practically impossible to get the full benefits of swimming if you only go about it alone, with no-one to train with and no-one to show you the ropes. Having said that: even if ...


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I'm a bit bewildered that you say your problems started after you started wearing goggles. Were you able to see the bottom of the ses before that? Or did you just close your eyes? If the latter is the case, I would say you should try using goggles, but closing your eyes like you used to. You see, one great obstacle in both open water swimming and scuba ...


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All the other answers are good to, but really: 2'20" per 100 in a straight 1000, by someone who only swims 3000 over 3 sessions per week is not at all "bad". As an aside, swimmers don't count "laps", and if they do, it's the same as "length". Swimmers count metres (or in the US, yards). And if you want to get better than the current state of "not too bad", ...


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I guess your avatar means you normally play curling? That means you might want to get the benefit of swimming to strengthen your core muscles. You don't mention what kind of strokes you know, more than freestyle ("front crawl" I suppose) and backstroke ("back crawl" I hope?). Either of those will, when executed properly, strengthen your core by the rotation ...


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In addition to the two previous answers by Amanda R. and JohnP, here's another very important point: Keep your head down. Body position is extremely important in swimming, and your saying that you get out of breath already after less that a 50 tells me that you probably have your legs sinking behind you – as a result of your lifting your head out of the ...


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A common mistake beginners make is not to shove their faces under the water. And they forget to exhale before inhaling. Really. If this is your problem, you should get yourself a proper pair of swimming goggles and practice at really getting your face under water as you stretch your arms forward in the reach part of the arm stroke (which immediately ...


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A device often used by swimmers for strengthening the swim-specific muscles of the arms and torso while out of the water is a rubber hose. There are several types commercially available, although I have also used a simple rubber hose with knotted handles at the ends to do the same thing. All you do is attach the middle of the tube/hose to something sturdy, ...


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Yes, it is normal. Not just after swimming open water, although the waves and unpredictability of conditions make it harder to keep water out of your nose than in a pool. It is also completely normal to have water in your ears, for example.


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Exhale through your nose, too, in addition to the other advice. Even if you're swimming fast (or, rather, particularly then) you can exhale both through the mouth and nose. Benefits are at least twofold: you get the air out quicker, getting ready to inhale properly, and the air going out of the nose keeps you nose nice and comfortably not waterlogged.


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Adding to the other answers: No, there are no particular disadvantages to getting your nose full of water. Pools are generally rather clean, and lakes and oceans are too, at least where you are likely to swim. And if you are feet down head up, your nostrils are down, making it hard for the water to enter if you close your epiglottis. That said, you should ...


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Of the two strokes you say you know, breaststroke is very difficult to learn to swim fast, and certainly hard to use as a cardiovascular exercise for any significantly long time. Assuming (by the fact that you only know half the strokes) that you are not a competitive swimmer, freestyle is best for you. To add to [Ivo Flipse]'s1 answer: in addition to ...


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Do whichever one that fits your schedule. Note that if you choose to do the swimming in the morning and working out in the evening, then your nutrition needs to be looked at a bit more carefully. For example, if in the morning, after you finish your swimming workout, and you don't eat an adequate amount of carbs and protein in order to replenish your ...


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Yes, you can do both in one day. I have done (and seen many others) a body-building workout immediately followed by a swim work out many times. Just make sure you stretch and stay hydrated.


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As an American Red Cross Lifeguard Instructor I can say with absolute certainty that for the 300 yard swim it does not matter how much of it is front crawl or how much of it is breaststroke, but you can only swim those two strokes and can only switch strokes at a wall (not in the middle of a the pool). Also it is likely that your instructor will have you do ...



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