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23

Tabata is a HIIT method and the process is very straightforward, from RossTraining.com: Tabata intervals consist of 20 seconds of maximum intensity exercise, followed by 10 seconds of rest. This cycle is repeated 8 times (for a total of 4 minutes)... you can apply this protocol to almost any exercise. A few popular examples include hitting a ...


12

Here's a link to the Library of Medicine article discussing the effectiveness. Yes, it's a form of HIIT, the basic idea is 8 - 20 second intervals followed by 10 seconds of rest. Is it effective? the studies performed have shown it to be and I can tell you from first hand experience that it's the most effective program I've used to build endurance and loss ...


7

From what I've read about Texas Method, an option for the Friday is to do dynamic effort sets instead of PR squats. Mark Rippetoe and Lon Kilgore say this (referring to swapping in dynamic effort sets in the Texas Method): When beginning this type of training, it is normal to continue to use 5 sets of 5 on Monday and replace Friday's workout with ...


6

It might be fine if you worked up to that kind of training volume, but be careful of overtraining. Tabatas and other HIIT is supposed to be hard. I happened to stumble across this post from Robb Wolf just a short while before I saw your question. It's relevant. Training volume is one of those “U-shaped curves”.... Too little isn’t good and neither is ...


5

The point of rest in Tabata protocol workouts isn't to let you fully recover, it's to let you recover a little in order to prolong the length of time you can sustain maximal effort without a dramatic decrease in output. There should never be a question of whether you pushed yourself hard enough during the work phase, because you should be exerting maximal ...


4

They are accurate as far as they go, but they are rough estimates at best. VO2 max is a measurement of how much oxygen you are actually using at maximal exertion. The only way to accurately measure this is by using specialized equipment with a mask that captures all exhalations, and then measures the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide that is being ...


4

It's fine to use a stationary bike for Tabata-style interval training. Much of Tabata's research was on stationary bikes. The protocol prescribes 4 minutes total of intense intervals: The whole session last 14 minutes and comprises of a 5 minute warm up, 4 minutes of intense exercise and a 5 minute cool down. The 4 minutes of intense exercise comprises ...


4

This is the single most exhausting training that you could take and yet it lasts so little. Regardless of the shape you are in, it's really hard. If you are in great shape, your sprint will be faster. If in mediocre shape, your sprint will be slower. But in general, if you push yourself, both types will be barely breathing at the end. :) I don't recommend ...


3

My preference would be to do conditioning like sprints on non-lifting days. Tuesday would be a good fit: you won't undercut your lifting efforts by tiring yourself out before a max-effort or volume day. But if I had to do my sprints on a lifting day, I'd make it Friday for the extra recovery time.


3

Do you own a smartphone/tablet? If it's available then get yourself an app for Tabata/HIIT. I personally use „Bodyweight Training by Mark Lauren“ (also available as book), which is progressive, customizeable and has a ton of exercises (and video descriptions for the iPad). A timer for tabata and a sample HIIT workout is also built-in. I think you get the ...


3

If you can go harder by "running" rather than "jumping" then you should do that. Anything that you can do for 1 to 2 minutes isn't "all out". You need to find a way to go all-out, 100%, in that 25 seconds. Messing with the edges of the protocol--5 seconds less rest or more work effort--isn't going to solve this central issue. Increase or decrease the ...


3

You could try the Cooper test, which is basically "run at a steady pace for 12 minutes and look at the table". I've always found it sufficient for my purposes (to see how much I improved in a given time period).


2

If we take Tabatas specifically, I'm not sure there's been anything large studied showing 20/10 to be superior to other methods of HIIT. I think the Tabata name is a red herring though, as interval training was done long before Tabata conducted his study, and if you look at the history he didn't discover anything new. So the 20 seconds on, 10 seconds off ...


2

I have done some research on internet on my question and I would try to answer my own question, but I will not accept this as an official answers until this gets an appropriate amount of up votes. Tabata work out burns around 12 calorie/min to 16 calorie/min. A common formula involves a 2:1 ratio of work to recovery periods, for example, 30–40 seconds of ...


1

Long enough that you're pushing against your limits, short enough that you're doing it the whole time. If you find yourself feeling/thinking at the end of a high intensity inveral "hey, I could have gone on a little longer!", then it's too short. Same if, at the end of the last interval, you're not thoroughly exhausted. On the other hand, if you you find ...


1

You could just do burpees, pushups, situps, air squats, etc. with various rep schemes (e.g., 5 rounds of 10 pushups, 25 situps, 30 airsquats for time, or as many rounds as possible in 20 minutes of 20 burpees, 100 unders with a jump-rope, 15 v-ups). Here's a great guide for no-equipment HIIT workouts: ...


1

Tabata, like sprinting, has significant anaerobic involvement (sprinters look muscly, runners look skinny). Your legs probably look fit and cut because your muscles have had to make significant gains (hypertrophy) over the last two months on the elliptical. If you were to total up calorie expenditure from each area of your body during a workout, I'm sure ...



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