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16

Take a look at this article: The Athlete's Heart. Looking at your exercise regimen, I think you are more of an athlete than you realize. Just biking the 8 miles a day has you putting on at least 40 miles per week of aerobic exercise. The article states that with a heavy aerobic exercise regimen, the heart responds by lowering its heart rate, but ...


11

My Max heart rate is ~182 according to the usual calculation methods. At the risk of not actually answering the question: have you considered the possibility that this estimate of your maximum may be quite different from your actual maximum? You mentioned that your age is 38, and I noticed that your supposed max of 182 conveniently fits with the ...


10

Having had a zone test before, it's important to understand that your maximum workout heart rate will likely be lower than your maximum physical heart rate. It is also important to limit testing your actual physical heart rate to proper cardiologists. That said, you don't need to get the max physical heart rate to get a set of useful zones and a customized ...


9

Sounds like you are doing great; and no, you are certainly not wasting your time. The new physical activity guidelines according to the cdc say that you can break up your exercise into 10 minute workouts and still get the health benefits as long as you are getting at least 150 minutes (2.5 hrs.) per week of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise such as ...


8

My advice is to ignore the 'zones'. If it doesn't FEEL like max effort, then its clearly not max effort. HR is an individual thing. I can push my HR above 220 if try hard and I'm not unfit. If you can run for 45 minutes at any pace you are NOT unfit. I'd say you should pay more attention to how you FEEL, not to the numbers infront of you.


6

Again, this is something that is subjective and going to vary from person to person. I generally monitor my HR a few times during the week first thing when I wake up, and occasionally when I'm just sitting around watching TV. These will give you baselines. When I finish a workout, I'll take my HR immediately, and once again in a minute or two. These are ...


6

Does max heart rate vary by activity? No. Your MAXIMUM heart rate is how fast your heart can beat, or, contract, in one minute. For the same level of effort, my heart rate on a bike is significantly lower than when running. You will experience a difference in heart rate between these exercises because you don't spend the same amount of energy while ...


6

Yes. Your target heart rate is based on a percentage of your maximum heart rate. The formula is: (((220 - Age) - RHR) * 0.7) + RHR This formula will figure for 70% of your maximum based on the Karvonen Method. Your Resting Heart Rate (RHR) should be averaged over a few days (3-5). You should take it upon waking, before getting out of bed, and count total ...


5

In contrast to @rmx's answer, I'll say that the zones are a very useful way to intelligently build up your cardiovascular performance. The key is to get tested to find your personal heart rate zones. They will also provide you with a set of workouts that incorporate some intervals to increase your overall performance. The zone testing will find your AB ...


5

Ultimately a "good" resting heart rate must be determined by you and your doctor/physiologist/licensed personal trainer. Many things go into determining what is a "good" resting heart rate. However, a good rule of thumb is the lower the better. As you increase your aerobic fitness, your heart rate will usually drop. A personal example: At the peak of my ...


4

The main things to look for in a heart rate monitor for exercise workouts is its accuracy, readability, functions and ease of use. Accuracy - Check your radial pulse and compare it to the heart rate monitor for accuracy. At rest you can check it for 60 seconds. During exercise you can check your pulse for 6 secs and multiply by 10. If you need a heart ...


4

Your max heart rate will happen typically at the end of the marathon, when you're making your final push for the finish line. Comparing your heart rate throughout the majority of the marathon to this maximum isn't very meaningful. Maybe you just worked really hard right at the end and you'd end up with your steady heart rate being a lower percentage of your ...


4

HR is a very accurate measure of effort, and as delayed as any other natural parameter, call it breathing, perceived effort, fatigue (or even sweat to give another example). Your heart doesn't know if it's cold or hot, uphill or downhill. Any factors that increase/decrease your heart rate will likely impact your performance The only thing that might be ...


3

Heart is a muscle. You train your muscles by using them. To make heart stronger and more efficient (lower BPM), you have to do exercises which significant increas your heart rate - any kind of cardio will do. BPM of avarge Joe is around 70-75. Athletes usually have BPM around 50-60. To give you direct answer - low hear rate is achieved with cardio ...


3

Like many things, the answer to this question depends entirely on what your goals are. I'm going to go out on something of a limb and say that you seem more interested in weight maintenance and heart/lung tone than you do on training or strength gain. Please take a look these links to get a feeling for what's going on when your heart is at various levels ...


3

Varied types and intensities and durations of exercise will challenge your body more than consistent repeated activities. An activity that doesnt make you sweat is not much of an exercise. I would ride hard some days and easy some days, maybe adjusted according to which days you have time to shower :) Also consider intervals, different routes to include ...


3

I had the same situation. There is nothing strange about it, but it suggests that you're relatively unfit. Here is why. At any given intensity your body requires certain cardiac output (liters of blood/minute) to fill muscles with oxygenated blood and sugars. Cardiac output depends on two values: heart rate and heart stroke volume -- amount of blood shoot ...


3

No worries Having a resting heart rate around 55 bpm is not unusual. Frequently experiencing a heart rate over 200 bpm is not unusual. And neither are really an indication of overall fitness. And neither at this point should cause alarm. If there IS anything unusual about the numbers you provided is the range between your resting heart rate and the ...


3

ShapeFit.com has a list of factors that influence your BMR. Basal metabolic rate, or BMR, is the minimum calorific requirement needed to sustain life in a resting individual. It can be looked at as being the amount of energy (measured in calories) expended by the body to remain in bed asleep all day! Calories are burned by bodily processes such as ...


2

Maybe you should try interval training? That way you can change pace once your heart rate goes up, run/walk slower until it's gone down again, and so on. The first time I started running I followed the Nike+ 5k plan, and the first session was 20 min alternating walking and running. My max heartrate on that first session was 186. After 5 weeks I did it again ...


2

Don't rely so much on the 'target' heart rate zones. Lets say the 'fat burning zone' is at 70% of your max, that does'nt mean you'll burn more calories at that rate than if you were at 80%, it means you'll get slightly more benefit per effort you put in. Your NET calories burnt will still be higher at the end of a workout of the same length if your heart ...


2

I’m prefacing this answer with the fact that I’m definitely not good with tech. I could be wrong, but I think my little Timex does this. (I’m not sure - I usually just strap mine on and go without using any of the features). But to try it out for you, I set a narrow target zone. The “in zone” timer counted when I was in the zone, stopped when I was out ...


2

I went through a similar situation with my C25K back in 2009. I was 45. According to a Garmin monitor, my HR hit 191 during one of my earlier runs while practicing a fast cadence. As with your question, I was a bit scared by that number and did not do that again. Even at my very slow, shuffle running pace, my HR would often be in the 165-170 range. A ...


2

If you have concerns about your heart rate then I would see a doctor. However, I wouldn't be concerned about the numbers you present above. I've run half-marathons with my heart rate sitting on 170bpm (at age 25 and I was 5'6 and 140 pounds). I must temper that statement by saying that you're taller and heavier than most runners but not by enough for those ...


2

Max heart rate cannot be calculated, you can only try to reach max rate and measure it. I'm also 38 and my max rate was 204 last year. That was measured by a doctor during a test, I went to the doctor because everyone told me I probably had a problem because of my high rate, the doctor reassured my and explained the 220-age thing is just an average. One ...


2

I've had my eye on the Basis B1 for a while, and they seem to be ready to launch in spring 2012.


2

You should not be able to last more than a couple of minutes in Zone 5. Maybe the problem is that he is talking about Zone 4, and you are thinking he means Zone 5. What is Fink's definition of Zone 5? Here is a detailed decriptions of the zones http://www.3-fitness.com/tarticles/zones.htm


2

I think it comes down to preference as long as it takes your heart rate accurately. I prefer the HRMs that provide a strap that goes around your chest. Most machine will pick up on this so you won't always need your watch (unless you have timers set up on them). You can test the watch by finding your pulse (in your dominant hand) on the thumb side of ...


1

Normal heart rate recovery is a decrease in your hr of 20-25 bpm (in 1 minute). For a fitter person it would be 30-45 bpm (in 1 minute). Abnormal heart rate recovery is usually defined as 12 or fewer bpm (in 1 minute). For the number 12 this is the ref


1

Alpha is strapless. It is not clear if it stored everything on the device, but technically it can beam continuously to a SmartPhone, and there seems to be some apps for it (I am investigating) Somebody edited in this:A review is here The review actually describes one day of continuous recording with a smartphone app (Bluetooth). Seems it worked well, ...



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