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8

Yes, there are benefits to training in the heat, but there are also risks. As @Ivo pointed out, you are far more likely to overheat / heat stroke / dehydrate when exercising in hot weather. However, if you take the proper precautions, there are benefits to be gained from training in the heat. What's more, these benefits will directly impact your success in ...


6

I would be skeptical as well. Although there may be an increased metabolic load to cool the body, it seems to me that the readings are more likely to be related to measurement error of the Bodybugg. According to the company, the Bodybugg contains four sensors: Accelerometer Heat Flux (amount of heat being dissipated by the body) Galvanic Skin Response ...


5

It looks like there was a British study that concluded if you change room temperature from an average of 71°F to an average of 60°F (that's going to be quite a cold room) that one could burn 400 to 500 extra calories per day leading to a possible weight loss of about 9 pounds per year. That seems like an awful uncomfortable way to lose 9 pounds. ...


4

From personal experience, I can say that you will lose some insulation when you lose fat, but that may not change much for you. I lost around 85 pounds of fat, and I can say that I get really cold in the winter. My hands are almost always ice cubes, but my thyroid tested out OK. I have to button up my jackets now, but now I can so it's OK. I've always ...


4

The answer to this question depends on whether you believe you should allow or prevent inflammation during recovery. This article explains both sides of the issue. Your trainer probably believes that some level of inflammation, extra blood flow, etc. is beneficial to recovery, and that a jacket can significantly affect that. Inflammation begins after you ...


3

In 100% humidity in a temperature above body temperature you will die from over heating... quickly. Sweating is one of the most biologically efficient ways of reducing body heat. however it is influenced by humidity. Sweating operates through evaporative cooling, which requires a relatively low-humidity environment. As humidity goes up, less water can ...


3

I believe this is dehydration and/or exhaustion. There are multiple message boards and online forums where people conclude this. Here is just one example I too have experienced this MULTIPLE times, usually after extremely hard workouts or prolonged endurance events. I've done multiple 24-hour ski races where I never stop during the 24-hours. I end up ...


3

There are varying ranges of educational levels for trainers. They could be non-high school graduates that sat for one of the 4-6 hour personal training courses to those having a Bachelor's in Exercise Science with a Master's of Exercise Physiology. Some of the time trainers will not know the reasoning behind a method (keeping the muscles warm in this ...


3

People have been doing physical exertion for millenia without air conditioning. This includes training in the cold as well. Each extreme has its own challenges, there won't be any lasting systemic damage if you take care of the issues. Training in Heat Hydration is most important. You will sweat more--and sweating is a good thing. Your performance will ...


3

I cannot answer all but I will do what I can... Drinking hot beverages doesn't aid in the digestion, but it increases your metabolism. I drink hot water in the AM to help 'induce' a 'flushing' of my excess before big races. Drinking water near room temperature allows the water and fluid to be absorbed into your body quicker and easier. Thus room temp. ...


2

Unfortunately, I don't have any knowledge of the concept of regulating your body temperature, and am also equally unsure of any affects of capsaisin acid (spicy stuff) on your core temperature. However, I am familiar with the concept of some foods being more thermogenic than others. Essentially some foods require more energy to digest than others. In ...


2

People that did a lot of exercise can have a lowered immune response, so they end up sick. Usually after many hours of working out like after marathons or ultra-marathons and so on some people get sick because their immune system doesn't have enough resources to fight off infections. That depends on your condition - do you work out a lot, how do you eat (do ...


2

Co-signing to what you said. In the hot summer days I would always try to drink a rather cold water in order to cool down. Just how you said the body warms it up so it basically takes away from the body's temperature. It always works well for me. I also know from my doctor that very cold water will shock your system and from my dentist that it is bad for ...


2

The energy you burn exercising is not directly connected to the ambient temperature. In fact you body is very efficient at regulating its temperature (within reasonable limits). So the only thing that changes as temperature go up is that you are going to sweat more to maintain normal body temperature, hence you will need to drink more to stay hydrated (See ...


1

Runners are cooled by the surrouding air (when cooler than the body temperature), and by sweat vaporization. The higher the air temperature, the more we rely on vaporization for keeping cool. If the humidity is high, the air is more saturated with water, and vaporization becomes less effective. The body responds by sweating more. If both temperature and ...


1

Drinking your cold water is fine. And no, it doesn't defeat the purpose of the exercise. The purpose of the exercises (and the heat), according to Bikram Yoga is : Yoga changes the construction of the body from the inside out, from bones to skin and from fingertips to toes. So before you change it, you have to heat it up to soften it, because a warm ...


1

Weight loss is significant with 2 things for normal individuals (no hormomal imbalances): Exercising more and Eating less That's common sense, and that's also science. With that being said, currently there is no scientific evidence regarding temperature and weight loss in a significant number. So, the answer is no, especially going from 75 degrees to ...


1

I play tournament badminton and having fever after a tournament or even longer games is standard for me. I get high body temperature, sore throat, clogged nose and all flu-like symptoms. Have to get under a warm blanket or wear a pullover cos of the cold. The symptoms stay only until night, and next morning they're gone. I eat properly during longer game ...



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